Go Back   iRV2 Forums > MOTORHOME FORUMS > Toads and Motorhome Related Towing
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-31-2007, 11:38 AM   #15
Member
 
SMI Manufacturing, Inc.'s Avatar
Official iRV2 Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 45
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Route 66:

Brent, how does either SMI system supply the "boost", and can either system be adjusted to provide non proportional braking? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I will answer you question in two ways...

Simple:

It doesn't need to apply boost. Air Force One applies 100% proportional braking effort, and Stay-IN-Play comes on in a medium to hard stop (adjustable) and applies progressive braking effort in a panic stop.

Technical:

SMI systems are designed to work a vacuum-assisted brake pedal at a little over half boost or a hydra-boost pedal at no boost. Here is why:

Vacuum-assisted braking decreases the pedal effort of a vehicle by using a lack of atmospheric pressure generated by the engine to assist in moving the hydraulic fluid from the master cylinder to the brake calipers/drums. The vacuum level in the booster varies depending on the vehicle, the RPM at which the engine is running, and the load on the engine. An average value is ~20 inHg. SMI systems are engineered to operate the brake pedal of the towed properly at 12 inHg. A fully boosted vacuum pedal would be next to impossible to properly modulate, and would greatly amplify any user error.

Hydraulically boosted braking (or hydra-boost) decreases the pedal effort of a vehicle by the use of hydraulic pressure (similar to power steering). Typically this pressure is attained from the power-steering pump, although some newer vehicles (H3, Vue Hybrid, Escape Hybrid) use a completely separate hydraulic system.


Isn't dead pedal braking impractical?

"Dead pedal" braking, as most people know it, is very impractical; however, "dead pedal" braking, as most people know it, is in a Vacuum-Assisted application, not a Hydra-Boost application.


Why do the SMI systems work the same in both applications? What is the difference?

A vacuum-assisted pedal is very stiff when it is not energized because the pedal is actually fighting air pressure (from compressing the brake booster which is now at atmosphere) and braking fluid pressure. A hydra-boost pedal does not have the resistance of the brake booster. This is why all the "dead pedal" system now have disclaimers stating that they do not work on hydra-boost brakes. This is why the brakes on Bob's Hummer were overheating with his old system, and now they are not with the Air Force One. To prove this we measured the brake fluid pressure at the caliper of both a hydra-boost and a vacuum-assisted vehicle with the same SMI system with the same configuration. Both values were nearly identical.

Let me know if you have any other questions.

Brent Schuck
Research and Development
Graphic Design
__________________

__________________
SMI Manufacturing, Inc.
(812) 428-2794
smibrake.com
SMI Manufacturing, Inc. is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 07-31-2007, 12:02 PM   #16
Community Administrator
 
Route 66's Avatar


 
Newmar Owners Club
Retired Fire Service RVer's
Spartan Chassis
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Newark, DE
Posts: 25,614
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">This is why all the "dead pedal" system now have disclaimers stating that they do not work on hydra-boost brakes. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I consider the Brake Buddy Vantage a dead pedal system, but I see no disclaimer on their web site.
__________________

__________________
Adios, Dirk - '84 Real Lite Truck Camper, '86 Wilderness Cimarron TT, previously 4 years as a fulltimer in a '07 DSDP

Route 66 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2007, 12:51 PM   #17
Member
 
SMI Manufacturing, Inc.'s Avatar
Official iRV2 Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 45
I am surprised. I have personally talked to people who have had trouble with that system on hydra-boost. One that sticks out is a gentleman that hit a big dip before an overpass bridge. The unit came on (since it only requires inertia to activate) and pushed the pedal so hard it flat spotted all four tires. That is rare. Usually it is just hot brake smell after towing coupled with premature brake wear. The fact remains that if you put x amount of pressure on a "dead" vacuum pedal and x amount of pressure on a "dead" hydra-boost pedal, the hydra-boost will brake the vehicle much harder. Here is RoadMaster's disclaimer:

Braking Systems

The following information relates to the installation of the supplemental braking system selected above.
Every reasonable effort has been made to verify the accuracy of this information; however, ROADMASTER, Inc. does not warrant its accuracy and disclaims liability for any claims or damages which may result from errors or omissions.

At This time there is NO braking system for the H3 Hummer, the Lexus GX470, any Ford Escape Hybrids or Mercury Mariner Hybrids.
__________________
SMI Manufacturing, Inc.
(812) 428-2794
smibrake.com
SMI Manufacturing, Inc. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2007, 04:56 PM   #18
Member
 
Howard Leap's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: The Woodlands, Tx
Posts: 99
Darn, now I am freaked out. I have a 2007 GMC Sierra Crew Cab 4x4 to tow. I can't tell if it has hydra-boost brakes or not. I can't seem to find any info in my manuals or on the internet that would indicate one way or the other. It looks like a vacuum assisted system to me...

Dirk brought up a good point about proportional braking vs. non proportional braking. But there are three other issues that concern me about systems like SMI, M&G, etc. and they are the reasons I decided to buy a self contained braking system.

First

There is the issue of an installed system. You get a box of parts from a company and somebody needs to put it all together and make it work. It needs to be tailored and adapted to literally 100s of vehicles. We are taking about a critical system. Personally, I don't want to tie into the MH's air brakes and I don't really want to modify the braking system on a towed vehicle. What about the warrantee? How qualified are the installers to work on 100s of different vehicles braking systems? Do they have vehicle specific training? Do they accept any liability? I doubt any major auto manufacturer will warrant your braking system after being modified. It will be a case of finger pointing as to what system failed. I have been involved in a number of instances where a manufacturer will NOT honor a warrantee on a modified system.

What about a system failure. I am sure SMI, M&G, etc. will warrantee their parts, but what about the installation? Will they be liable for ancillary damages (loss of life and property)? I'm not talking about a failure when you are driving the MH and the toad brakes fail. I am talking about driving 70 MPH on the freeway with your family in the car (toad not attached to the MH).... and it fails because a fitting wasn't tightened properly. Then what?

With a Brake Buddy (or similar system) I don't tie into the MH's brakes or modify the toad's brake system. No intervention into a working system. I'm not saying their system couldn't have a problem, but it seems the worse case scenarios might be putting flat spots on tires or burning up brake pads.

Second

Brake Buddy and Even Brake systems are transportable between vehicles with a minimum of effort. There are a number of reasons I might want to change toads. I wear out cars frequently (putting about 30,000 miles a year on my toad because I'm a consultant who travels) or I could have an accident and need a new vehicle. Either way I would be out possibly another $1500 for a new toad braking system dedicated to the new vehicle.

Third

Brake Buddy and Even Brake systems are substantially cheaper than installed systems. Not that cost is an objective, but it is a consideration. Installed systems cost near $1000, there is installation ($500), and then there is the cost of getting to the installers (maybe you have to travel 200+ miles and stay at a RV Park overnight) which could be another $200 or more. Self contained systems can be delivered to your door.

Anyway, just my 2 cents worth....
__________________
Gladys and Howard Leap...Casper (pictured) and Charlie (BCs)
2007 Holiday Rambler Endeavor PDQ (The Border Collie Limo) towing a 2007 GMC Sierra Crew Cab 4X4
Howard Leap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2007, 01:02 PM   #19
Member
 
SMI Manufacturing, Inc.'s Avatar
Official iRV2 Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 45
You should be worried, but I'm not sure if the topic is worthy of "freak-out status" or not. I realize that I am on a thin line between presenting information and presenting a product. The task becomes even more difficult as I have used most systems on the market and the experience has only made me personally believe in the SMI products more. I am not in way trying to you or anyone else which system to purchase – Honestly, I wish that everyone at least had something –, but I do feel it my duty to provide accurate information that allows you and everyone else to make you own decision, not the marketing departments' decision. That said, here is the unbiased response to your last post...

First, to make sense out of this discussion, we must separate SMI from M&G. There are similarities, but also major differences.

M&G-Activation for the brakes of the towed vehicle comes from a four-inch cylinder mounted behind the master cylinder that moves brake fluid. Every vehicle (more or less) has a different cylinder as the master cylinder is different. Relocating the master cylinder also results in the need to rebend the brake lines and frequently requires the relocation of the battery, fuse block, air intake, etc. of the towed vehicle. Activation air pressure comes from the relay valve on the back of the coach and is unprotected.

Air Force One-Activation for the brakes of the towed vehicle comes from a 3.75"x0.875" cylinder mounted on the brake arm of the towed vehicle (above the pedal). As for the vacuum assist, a nylon tee is place in the rubber vacuum hose on the brake booster. Since all vehicles have similar brake arms and brake boosters, there are no special parts needed, or vehicular modifications. Activation air pressure comes from the relay valve on the back of the coach and is protected.

Now that we have that understanding, I will try my best to answer your questions.


<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">I can't tell if it has hydra-boost brakes or not </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

To determine which system your truck has, simply look at the firewall where the master cylinder is (where you add brake fluid).

If there is a black "drum" type reservoir between the firewall and the master cylinder, you have vacuum-assisted brakes. If this is the case, you will also notice a hose coming out of the reservoir at the 10 o'clock position that goes to the intake manifold.

If the master cylinder appears to mount directly to the firewall, and there are two hoses that go to the power steering pump, then you have a hydra-boost braking system.


<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> It needs to be tailored and adapted to literally 100s of vehicles. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

For M&G, this is true. If this is to be said of Air Force One, then one must be fair and say that the box brakes must be tailored and adapted to fit the hundreds of brakes pedals on the market. Air Force One is just as universal as a box brake, but it is definitely not as portable.


<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> I doubt any major auto manufacturer will warrant your braking system after being modified. It will be a case of finger pointing as to what system failed. I have been involved in a number of instances where a manufacturer will NOT honor a warrantee on a modified system. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Of the thousands and thousands customers that we have, I have not heard of one denied warranty claim. The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act prevents a dealer (that provides a warranty) from not upholding the warranty because of the addition of an aftermarket part. It can be viewed in its entirety here. This act clearly puts the burden of proof on the dealership, not the customer. Here are a couple of "for instance's":

1) You put in a brake that energizes the vacuum assist in the towed. Your vehicle develops vacuum leak and is running poorly (this actually happened to the president of SMI). You take the car to the dealer and describe the problem. In order to deny the claim, they MUST implicitly PROVE that the aftermarket part was at fault. In the case of the President, the Dodge dealer did not even mention anything about the system. In this case, the dealership would fix the problem under the warranty.

2) You put in a box brake the sticks on and burns the brakes off of your car. The dealership would look at the vehicle and easily be able to prove that it was user error/abuse and you would be liable for all repairs.

In either case, the average dealer is not going to give you trouble unless they think that they have a good case. Customer satisfaction is very, very important to the auto dealership. If a dealer has too many upset customers, they will get their status yanked in a hurry. They are not going to just throw out allegations. You don't have to believe me, call and ask them; they are very serious about how the manufacturer views them.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> ...but what about the installation </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Just like the box brakes, SMI and M&G have many self-installers. You are correct; no aftermarket part manufacturer is going to warrant a third-party install. Whether it is a 12v coffee warmer or a braking system, there is no possible way to supply a warranty on the product's installation. If the person installing the breakaway switch on the box brake grounds the power wire out and causes damage to the vehicle's electrical system, the manufacturer (e.g. BrakeBuddy, Roadmaster, etc.) is not going to fit the bill. They simply can't. Most reputable dealers carry at least a 30 day warranty on the work. Our factory installs carry a 90 day warranty.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> ... and it fails because a fitting wasn't tightened properly. Then what? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Fortunately, SMI does not tie into the vehicle's braking system so this simply cannot happen. The ONLY connection in to the vehicle is a barbed tee put in to the rubber vacuum line of the towed vehicle. M&G does tap in to the vehicle's hydraulics so it is a hypothetical possibility, although I have never heard of a case of an M&G system failing.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> ...but it seems the worse case scenarios might be putting flat spots on tires or burning up brake pads. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Now this is one I have heard several cases of. Unfortunate for many, this is not the worst-case scenario. A majority of the case of burned up brakes are a result of the unit malfunctioning without the coach notification coming on. About half of the cases I have talked to only had brake pad and tire damage, but the other half had much worse damage. Pulling a vehicle with the brakes on causes extreme friction, and in turn, heat. This heat is transferred to the extremely flammable brake fluid, causing it to boil. The now over-flowing fluid makes contact with the over-heated braking system of the towed (which is now well over 500ΒΊF) causing it to ignite. At this point, the rims and tires are melted, the rotors and pads are shot, the calipers are seized, the ABS module and sensors are melted, the integrity of the master cylinder and brake lines are at best compromised, and the front of the vehicle is on fire. Yes, it DOES happen.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> Either way I would be out possibly another $1500 for a new toad braking system dedicated to the new vehicle. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The beauty of all SMI systems is their universality. Whether you are towing a VW Beetle, a Ram 3500, or anything in between, your SMI will go right in without any special parts. Just like a box brake, you would remove the breakaway switch off the front of the car and the operating unit. Obviously, removing the box is going to be more simple. Actually it will already be done, as it must be removed every time you are done towing.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> Brake Buddy and Even Brake systems are substantially cheaper than installed systems. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I cannot speak for M&G, but the Air Force One is just under $1000. As far as other units on the market: The BrakeBuddy Classic is $1149.00, the BrakeBuddy Vantage is $1399.00, the EvenBrake is $1332.23, and the Blue Ox Apollo/Luxor is not currently in production, although there are still some available for purchase.

Keep in mind I am not trying create spin in one way or another, but there are some definitions an RV`er must know in order to make an educated decision. "Terrain Sensing Technology" and "Surge Suppressor" are the two most common terms you will see. This is a thought process that "inertia only" systems must use to determine what type of inertia is present. A pothole, a dip in the road, braking the coach, and falling off a cliff all create inertia, but how does the brake know when to turn on? It must think; and thinking takes time. All inertia only systems have this delay to some extent or another. It is just the nature of the beast. Depending on the manufacturer, this "thought process" takes anywhere between 1-3 seconds. One second at 60 mph is 88 feet, and 3 seconds is 264 feet. Some times the difference between a fatality and everyone going home safe is one foot. Just earlier this week, someone (using one of the 3 second variety) was in an accident. No injuries, just damage to the coach and the other vehicle involved. He said "I slammed on the brake and the **** thing never even turned on." It was in slower traffic, so the accident didn't exceed three seconds. He stopped less than one foot after impact. No doubt, an operable supplemental brake would have save at least one foot of stopping distance. Instead, he now has a $1000 deductible to pay and his premium will go up. This doesn't happen to everyone to be sure; but for him, which brake was less expensive?

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> Installed systems cost near $1000, there is installation ($500), and then there is the cost of getting to the installers (maybe you have to travel 200+ miles and stay at a RV Park overnight) which could be another $200 or more. Self-contained systems can be delivered to your door. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

$500 is about right to install the M&G system, but I do know for a fact that most of our dealers charge $200-$300 for the Stay-IN-Play model and $300-$400 for the Air Force One, while about half of our customers are "self-installers." Do keep in mind that with any braking system, you at least have to install a breakaway switch on the front of the car that most dealers charge 0.5-1 hour for.


There were a lot of questions in your last post, so let me know if I missed one if you need any clarification.

Brent Schuck

Research and Development
Graphic Design
__________________
SMI Manufacturing, Inc.
(812) 428-2794
smibrake.com
SMI Manufacturing, Inc. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2007, 05:14 PM   #20
Member
 
Howard Leap's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: The Woodlands, Tx
Posts: 99
Brent,

Thanks for clarifying the differences between the vacuum brake and hydra-boost system. I had never seen a hydra-boost but I knew my system had a vacuum reservoir. I just didn't know what else to look for.

Yes, your salesmanship comes through loud and clear. That is not necessarily a bad thing as. you seem to truly believe in the SMI system and how it works. Whether it is the best system out there is debatable. I think one thing we can agree on is: every toad should have some kind of supplemental braking system. From there it is up to each individual to do his due diligence and decide what is best for his situation. What I was trying to do in my previous post was give the reasons I did not want an invasive system. Unfortunately there is no perfect system out there. Every system has its flaws, even the SMI.

If you think about it, it's a darned if you do and darned if you don't situation. Without a supplemental braking system, I risk accidents and perhaps with more serious outcomes. With a supplemental braking system, I could have failures that result in toad damage (Flat spots on tires, burned brakes, or worse) or I could have catastrophic failure of the toad brake when not being towed. This is where I need to do my homework and assume the liability for the decisions I make. Up until a few years ago nobody had a supplemental braking system on their toad. I drove class A motor homes for 10+ years without one. My father-in-law drove for over 20 years without one. We never had a problem. Does that make it OK, no, we know better now. We didn't have near the technology 20 years ago that we do today. No tire pressure monitoring systems, no auto generator starting systems, no surge protection systems, etc. etc. etc.

I would really like to see some verifiable statistics on all this..... number of supplemental braking systems in use by manufacturer, failures of same systems, types of failures, accidents attributable to toads not having braking systems, etc. Sorry (no offense intended), but salesmen are the worlds worst at taking hearsay and elevating it to the level of statistical analysis.
__________________
Gladys and Howard Leap...Casper (pictured) and Charlie (BCs)
2007 Holiday Rambler Endeavor PDQ (The Border Collie Limo) towing a 2007 GMC Sierra Crew Cab 4X4
Howard Leap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2007, 06:17 AM   #21
Member
 
SMI Manufacturing, Inc.'s Avatar
Official iRV2 Sponsor
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 45
I whole-heartily agree. Any time there is a non-definitive matter of preference (e.g. The best brake) there will always be debate to be sure. That is why I attempted (to best of my ability ) to just present the facts instead of a product, although it was a little more difficult as the questions were directed toward the M&G and SMI units. I couldn't agree with you more on the "hearsay" part. One of the more difficult (and frustrating) parts is limiting what I say to observed fact and "straight-from-the-horse's-mouth" information; especially with how many people I talk to who have plenty of hearsay to share. There are a few differences between today and twenty years ago. Many features (which were not necessary then) are necessary now to support new technology. For example, the auto-starting generator you mentioned would help support the 50" television, 7.1 channel Dolby Digital surround sound system, heated tile flooring, three-unit roof air conditioning, vanity lighting, automatic roof vents, auto-retracting awning, etc., etc., etc. A towed-vehicle braking system helps support the fact that there is at least twice as many motorists on the road, the general intelligence trend of most of these motorists in not exactly going up, many people are talking on cell phones as they drive, and most of the time we are just trying to stop a lot more weight then anyone dreamed of twenty years ago. Again, allow me reiterate my intention. It is not to push anyone to a particular product, but to answer the presented questions and provide as much valid information as I can to help people make their own decisions. Letting other people make your decisions can be very dangerous, just ask the citizens of any dictatorship. Thank you for you professionalism and thought provoking questions.

Brent Schuck
Research and Development
Graphic Design
__________________
SMI Manufacturing, Inc.
(812) 428-2794
smibrake.com
SMI Manufacturing, Inc. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2007, 09:53 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
Gary the Wombat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Lake Berryessa, CA
Posts: 517
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by JoeT:
I don't have either one, but I agree with the fact that I don't want my toad brakes applied every time I stop. Only if I need to stop quicker than normal. That's the way my TowBrake is set up. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I have an Even Brake for my Jeep Wrangler. It is ajustable for both sensitivity and force and certainly does not come on every time I brake, only when I need to stop in a hurry (like at that darn red light that changes right at the "go/no go" point). The remote panel mounted in the MH confirms this.

I have towed my Jeep with this sytem for almost 8,000 miles now and have not noticed any unusual brake or tire wear (in fact I still have the original brake pads at 60,000 miles and got 35,000 miles from my last set of tires).

When I need it though, I can really feel the Even Brake come on and slow my MH down as well as if I wasn't towing at all. Just like the man said, I "wouldn't leave home without it."
__________________
2007 Winnebago 26P

Jeep Wrangler
Gary the Wombat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2009, 10:07 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
roboniko's Avatar
 
Newmar Owners Club
Solo Rvers Club
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 184
How will this work with a HUmmer H2?
__________________
Tim Heinzen
2013 King Aire
'12 Jeep COD MWF
roboniko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2009, 10:18 AM   #24
iRV2 Marketing
 
DriVer's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Coastal Campers
Carolina Campers
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Conway, SC
Posts: 23,304
Blog Entries: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by roboniko View Post
How will this work with a HUmmer H2?
roboniko, If I were going to install an auxiliary brake on an H2, I would consider an SMI solution where the braking unit is installed under the hood and forgotten about.

Having lived with Dan Decker's a brake in a box for several years, the SMI auxiliary brake for hydraulic or air brakes proves to me each time I use it that it is indispensable.

For not that much more money invested, an installed brake unit makes life a lot simpler. M&G and USG also provide installed auxiliary braking units however the service and support I have received from SMI has been very good to date.
__________________
03 Adventurer 38G, Workhorse W22
F&R Track Bars, Safety+ , Ultrapower, Taylor Extremes, SGII
TST 507, Blue Ox, SMI, Koni FSD, CrossFire
RV/MH Hall of Fame - Lifetime Member
DriVer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2009, 08:33 PM   #25
Moderator Emeritus
 
Gary RVRoamer's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Silver Springs, FL. USA
Posts: 18,085
Just a caution: A late model Hummer has an electric hydro Boost brake system and needs special aux brake set-up. I know Unified Tow Brake has a configuration for it and I suspect that SMI does also.
__________________

__________________
Gary Brinck
Former owner of 2004 American Tradition
Home is in the Ocala Nat'l Forest near Ocala, FL
Summers in Black Mountain, NC
Gary RVRoamer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Brake Buddy Vantage Select Montrealer Toads and Motorhome Related Towing 10 03-16-2009 11:43 AM
Brake Buddy Vantage Jemc02 Toads and Motorhome Related Towing 5 02-14-2009 08:39 AM
Brake Buddy Vantage - Reception problems JavaJelly Toads and Motorhome Related Towing 1 12-03-2007 09:33 AM
Brake Buddy vs Brake Pro vs Apollo Nedra Toads and Motorhome Related Towing 18 05-09-2005 07:15 AM
Brake Lights on Toads using Brake Buddy?? Petro Toads and Motorhome Related Towing 7 02-10-2005 07:13 AM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.