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Old 08-09-2014, 01:15 PM   #1
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Hitch Extenders and Longer Base Plate Tab

I'm wondering if I may be trying to do something that isn't a good/smart idea. I tow a Honda CRV and use a drop receiver with both a 2" drip and 4" rise. The car is attached to the 2" drop and I have a bike carrier in the 4" rise side. A picture is attached.

I want to add a 8.5" hitch extender to the 2" drop for the car for a couple reasons. The first is to push the tow bar pivot out far enough to clear the bike carrier. The second is to also push the car back further so that the carrier won't hit the car in turns.

On top of that I may need to get longer tabs for the base plate to clear the carrier but that remains to be seen. I have emailed Blue Ox about that.

I'm starting to think that adding an extension to a drop receiver may be pushing things a bit too much even for a relatively light toad. Any thoughts or suggestions?
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Old 08-09-2014, 01:29 PM   #2
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Don, I towed a 28' race car trailer behind a dually with a cab-over camper using a 2' (2") hitch extension for years - I did have a titan V (2-1/2" tube) hitch on the dually, and I used an equalizer hitch - but I also had a lot of tongue weight - it all depends on how solid the hitch on the coach is. I don't see the photo btw.
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Old 08-09-2014, 01:54 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sky_Boss View Post
I'm starting to think that adding an extension to a drop receiver may be pushing things a bit too much even for a relatively light toad. Any thoughts or suggestions?
An extension decreases the weight rating of your receiver. For example, my 14" extension reduces the WC rating of my receiver from 5,000 pounds max trailer or toad weight to 4,000 pounds max trailer or toad weight.

Read the specs of the extension you plan to buy, and be sure it has enough weight capacity to tow your CRV without exceeding the weight limits of the extended hitch .

I suspect you're slaughtering terms. The receiver is that square tube under the bumper, and it's bolted to the frame of the RV. You probably mean the shank that plugs into the receiver has both a riser side and a drop side. The receiver has a weight rating. The shank probably has a different weight rating, and the extension will have even a different weight rating. The lowest weight rating of those three is the one you go by. So if your receiver is rated 6,000 pounds WC, the shank is rated 5,000 pounds WC, and the extension is rated 4,000 pounds WC, then your max weight limit is 4,000 pounds. Assuming your tow bar is also rated for at least 4,000 pounds, then be sure the wet and loaded CRV doesn't gross more than 4,000 pounds.
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