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Old 03-04-2013, 01:40 AM   #15
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I've hauled bikes probably 100,000 miles, all in enclosed trailers. Here's my experience.

I've used both handle bars and triple trees. Both work fine although its worth checking the bushings to make sure they're not getting loose.

Always snag the front straps down tight first. Rears add tension, but the fronts hold it.

You'll do much better using some sort of front wheel chock; pingel makes a decent one. I've taken channel iron, bend to a 45 degree and bolted down.

Don't bother leaving bike in gear.

Triple check that none of your straps are crossing a painted surface.

Softies, which are nothing more then fabric strap extensions work well and keep the hooks off your bike.

Keep the bike as far forward as you can. They will bounce around like crazy in the back of the trailer. I've had them bounce hard enough that the lifters bleed down, many times.

Harley kick stands are bullet proof and you can strap the bike down while on the side stand with no problem.

ALWAYS check your straps a short way into your trip. They WILL loosen up, especially if you've strapped to the bars.

good luck
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Old 03-04-2013, 03:37 AM   #16
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Dont overtighten the straps. You might be tempted to wratchet down on the front forks until they bottom out... dont. There is a strong risk you'll blow a fork seal or worse if you do.

About half way compression on the front forks does it for me.

And... an enclosed trailer is the way to go if you have the means. It'd keep the bike clean and protect it from stone chips.
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Old 03-04-2013, 06:49 AM   #17
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Thanks again everybody !! Great info... All I have is a open trailer,, but I will get a cover for the bike if I do this... Just thought it might be a nice get away while we are parked in DW's Mom's yard... Ya know ?? Not much to do in the little Arizona town..
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Old 03-04-2013, 09:00 AM   #18
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As far as placement of the bike on the trailer: 12 to 15 % of total trailer weight, including bike, goes on tongue. So weigh the trailer loaded and weigh the tongue weight. That will tell you where to anchor your bike. Hope this helps, and safe riding to you.

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Old 03-04-2013, 09:10 AM   #19
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Do not travel with a cover on the bike. It may scratch the paint at worse but it will definitely tear if you tow a long enough distance at highway speeds. If you are using a flatbed trailer, you could nail a couple of 2x2 wood strips along the side of the wheels to serve as a rail if you don't have one on the trailer. It will also help in keeping the bike centered on the trailer.
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Old 03-04-2013, 09:45 AM   #20
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Not a Hog, but this should give you an idea.


OR go to your local Harley store. I'll bet that they will be glad to show you (and sell you a trailer too).
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Old 03-04-2013, 09:47 AM   #21
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Not a Hog, but this should give you an idea of how to do it.

Tie down your motorcycle.

OR go to your local Harley store. I'll bet that they will be glad to show you (and sell you a trailer too).
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Old 03-04-2013, 10:04 AM   #22
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All good advice....quality straps around fork tree or legs,passenger pegs make good rear location and also wire tie or tape loose ends (excess strap ) because they will wear the paint off by the time you reach your destination!
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Old 03-04-2013, 10:10 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrol 65 View Post
Do not travel with a cover on the bike. It may scratch the paint at worse but it will definitely tear if you tow a long enough distance at highway speeds. If you are using a flatbed trailer, you could nail a couple of 2x2 wood strips along the side of the wheels to serve as a rail if you don't have one on the trailer. It will also help in keeping the bike centered on the trailer.
The first time I towed a motorcycle on a trailer, I put a cover on it (to protect the bike and to generally look cool...)
But after 20 miles, that cover was taken off stowed safely in the trunk... It was as good as having a parachute back there... BAD idea...

I have seen guys to wrap the front of their bikes in old army blankets to protect them from stone chips... That look doesn't carry much street cred, but it gets the job done I guess...
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