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Old 09-12-2013, 07:29 AM   #1
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Loading a motorcycle in a Pickup

I am considering the loading options to carry a motorcycle in the back of my towed pickup. There are loader options or ramp options. The loaders are easy but more money. The only ramps I would consider are 36-40". Large enough so you wouldn't fall off. Any thoughts or experience would be appreciated.

Thanks!
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Old 09-12-2013, 07:58 AM   #2
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Ramps work fine for me. I bought a set of three from Loading Ramps, Hauling, Transport, & Skateboard Ramp Superstore - Discount Ramps.com. The set contained one wide ramp (24") and two narrow ramps (11") each. Heavy gauge aluminum and fold in half for storage. With the multiple ramps you can use any combo to get the width you want for whatever use you desire. The ramps work great for putting my 500lb bike in the back of my Ranger.
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Old 09-12-2013, 08:07 AM   #3
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Wider the better. Never want to lose your balance and not be able to put your feet down.

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Old 09-12-2013, 08:10 AM   #4
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Jim, I recently purchased and installed a Rampage Power Lift. Yes it was a bit expensive, but I have an 800lb+ bike and was not comfortable with the drive on ramps.

I agree that if you do use a drive on ramp you need one wide enough to be able to put your feet down if you have to stop on ramp. However once you start up the ramp your feet will not be able to touch the ramp until both wheels are on the ramp due to the angle. This applies if you ride the bike on. If you walk beside it then width is real important.

Speaking of angles you need to be aware of the break over angle at the top and attack angle at the bottom of the ramp. These are set by the heigth of the truck bed and the length of the ramps. At the bottom of the ramp so you don't drag the tailpipe and at the top so you don't get hung up on the bottom of your bike. I had both issues with a previous toy hauler. I had to make extensions for the ramp to reduce the angles.

Anyway, about the Rampage Power Lift. If you Google Rampage Power Lift you can see some videos of it in action. It will fit in a 5.5' bed, it just sticks out past the tailgate. In an 8' bed you can close the tailgate. The Rampage is bolted to the bed of the truck with 4 bolts and it does not rest on the tailgate. It had a 404 lbs shipping weight. After it is installed and wired in one person can take it apart (3 main pieces) and remove or install it in about 20 minutes. I have installed a small hoist in my garage to help me get mine in and out in one piece.

The loading and unloading of the bike can be done by one person. Just practice with the front straps, and make sure you have the kickstand out when unloading. Once loaded the bike is secured to tie downs in the truck bed, not the loader.

I have practiced the loading and unloading but, our first trip with the setup is in a couple of weeks.
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Old 09-12-2013, 08:10 AM   #5
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I use to use a 2x8 years ago. You of course don't dilly dally going up and good brakes are required when you get up in there When one wasn't available, I found a ditch to back the truck into. Probably doesn't help much huh?

But yeah, it looks like $$$ are the issue in the system you choose and the two you mentioned are the only 2 I know off.
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Old 09-12-2013, 08:28 AM   #6
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Wow! You guys are fast!

What I am considering is this.

10' ft long. I can easily flat foot on level ground, although good point about the break over points. I would love the loader, the rampage has several very good reports, it isn't in this years budget. So the options are a good ramp or leave the bike home this winter.

Do you ride it up the ramp or walk it up? This is a r1200GS about 550lbs.

Thank you!
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Old 09-12-2013, 08:36 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coma View Post
Wow! You guys are fast!

What I am considering is this.

10' ft long. I can easily flat foot on level ground, although good point about the break over points. I would love the loader, the rampage has several very good reports, it isn't in this years budget. So the options are a good ramp or leave the bike home this winter.

Do you ride it up the ramp or walk it up? This is a r1200GS about 550lbs.

Thank you!
I speak from the experience of loading two Harleys in the back of our truck every two weeks, for over 5 years. Get a small ATV winch (3500 pound capacity, about $300.00) and mount it in the truck bed, center. Then winch the bikes on and off. Much easier, safer and more in control.
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Old 09-12-2013, 08:38 AM   #8
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I don't know if you're a destination camper for the winter, but you could probably go to your local motorcycle shop near your home, load it up just before you leave and then do the same to unload down south.

Most have a ramp.
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Old 09-12-2013, 08:40 AM   #9
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I have an older 1200 cc Aspencade and there was no way I was going to ride it up a ramp at about 800#. I found this rig used and once install in truck, there is no problem loading the monster.
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Old 09-12-2013, 08:41 AM   #10
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Coma, I had worked in cycle dealerships for several years, I can't tell you how many bikes that I had come in for damage just from loading into pickups. Several that got damaged as brand new being loaded up at the dealership to take home, only to pick them up off the ground and bring them into the service department to be repaired. And some customers went to the ER as well. This requires very serious thoughts and planning. utube it and see for yourself.
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Old 09-12-2013, 08:44 AM   #11
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I have carried my Harley in the back of my truck for many years. Drive it up and down the ramp. The wider and longer the ramp the better.....but I started with 2x12's. A good front wheel chock in the bed makes getting off the bike to strap it down a lot easier.
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Old 09-12-2013, 08:48 AM   #12
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by the way, I now have the Big Boy ramp you are looking at. Works well and is light weight. Fits in the bed of the truck after you load the bike.
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Old 09-12-2013, 09:30 AM   #13
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I've been riding bikes up ramps for 40+ years, even the one's wide enough to walk them up. The 2 we have now are 900lbs as loaded. The safest way is to get them up there is quickly with plenty of centralfugal force. This keeps it in balance and less likely for a tip over on the ramp. But that's just me and your comfort level and experience may be different.

With a ramp wide enough to use your feet, when backing down, let it go down as fast as possible dragging your feet slightly to catch it if necessary. Again, speed is your friend in this situation. However, with wide ramps, walking up or down with good clutch and brake use is fine. I just don't like being on the ramp any longer than needed. I've seen too many meatheads fall off ramps because they were scared or go up or down fast. Knock on wood, never dropped one yet on a ramp and always do it alone
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Old 09-12-2013, 09:42 AM   #14
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Evel Knievel comes to mind!

When I was 20 something I would ride up a ramp. At 66 I think I am much smarter.
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