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Old 04-24-2012, 12:53 AM   #29
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Mr. D and Scarab, you both bring up very valid points re: the drop and overhang, and the tongue weight issue. So, you have the parts of the puzzle - 24" high receiver behind the Winnebago and a directive from Eze-Tow to have your ball no more than 16" off of the ground. Are you telling me that I'll have to go with another tow dolly or what?
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Old 04-24-2012, 01:04 AM   #30
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Even our KK-460 requires a ball height of 18". To get it correct I had to go to a 4" drop, then get a 1" higher ball. Put it right at 18" when the MH suspension is aired up.
Not sure what you need to do at this point.
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Old 04-24-2012, 02:30 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by sgtstriker View Post
Mr. D and Scarab, you both bring up very valid points re: the drop and overhang, and the tongue weight issue. So, you have the parts of the puzzle - 24" high receiver behind the Winnebago and a directive from Eze-Tow to have your ball no more than 16" off of the ground. Are you telling me that I'll have to go with another tow dolly or what?
I don't think any dolly mfgt would OK a 20" hitch height (24" receiver minus 4" drop hitch). That would put the dolly frame at a pretty steep angle. I know that the Master tow I borrowed and the U-haul dolly I rented used the same drop hitch I am using on my EZE-Tow to ride level.

On my Damon, I have a 8" drop hitch and the EZE-Tow is sitting just about perfectly level...so I guess I have a 24" high receiver too (never measured it).

I have only bumped the hitch on a driveway one time in all my driving, which is significant because the Outlaw has a long overhang and rear drop frame for the Garage.

Each of us must make our own decision. I love my EZE tow because it's so simple and I appreciate the disc/surge brakes...something I didn't see in other dolly's.

This all a moot point of you flat tow your Pick-up and big ol' moto in the bed...tow bars have almost no tongue weight.
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Old 04-24-2012, 06:03 AM   #32
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Hi Folks, It would appear that the "Eze Tow" is a winner. Let me ask another odd question. I may want to have access to both a toad and a motorcycle. Would it be insane to tow a small pick-up with a large motorcycle in the bed of the pick-up? And, I suppose that the pick-up would have to be front wheel drive?
(You can tell that this is all new to me can't you...:-)
Try this:




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Old 09-06-2012, 10:18 AM   #33
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I'm looking into getting a dolly as well. I'm still a pilgrim and I don't mean to sound stupid but what are "surge brakes". Thanks.
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Old 09-06-2012, 10:54 AM   #34
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Surge brakes are standard hydraulic brakes (either disk or drum) that are activated by a master cylinder built into the tongue of the trailer or dolly. The trailer hitch coupler on the trailer/dolly tongue is on a slide mechanism with a rod to the master cylinder. When you step on the brakes of the towing vehicle the inertia of the towed vehicle (trailer/dolly) pushes against the hitch on the towing vehicle. This causes the coupler to slide on its mechanism and the attached rod to activate the master cylinder and apply the trailer/dolly brakes.

There is a compression spring between the coupler and the master cylinder so the brakes aren't applied everytime you slow down or let off on the gas. Once the load overcomes the initial spring pressure the brakes are proportional. You can get different pressure springs depending on the load the dolly/trailer is rated to carry.

The upside is it's a simple system for the operator. There's no need for any additional equipment in the towing vehicle to activate the brakes. Everything is self contained in the dolly/trailer. All you have to do is hook it to the hitch like any other trailer and away you go.

The downside is the initial pressure necessary to overcome the spring is constant. If you use the trailer/dolly to carry widely differing weight loads the initial brake application will be sooner with the heavier load and somewhat delayed with the lighter load. Also the brakes are only applied when the load pushes against the hitch. That means no dolly/trailer braking when stopped on an incline or at extremely low speeds.

The system has been around for decades and is dependable and easy to operate. It requires only the standard maintenance of any other hydraulic braking system.
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Old 09-07-2012, 10:47 PM   #35
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I see that EZE has disk brakes. Is this an important option? I am planning to tow my 1995 Olds Cutlass convertible with a weight of 4000 lbs. My hitch is rated at 5000 lbs. Do you think that this is a safe combination or should I be looking at a smart car? (just kidding of course)
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Old 09-07-2012, 11:10 PM   #36
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The ACME is rated to tow a vehicle weighing up to 4985lbs, your 4000lb
vehicle would be no problem.
There is a reason that most vehicles now have disk brakes, it is because
they are better than drum brakes....
They are not an option on an ACME, they are standard, and the only dolly
that has them.

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Old 09-07-2012, 11:14 PM   #37
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According to Edmunds your Cutlass weighs 3690 lbs. I believe you are well within the capacity of your hitch. Just make sure the combination is within the GCWR of your motorhome. We towed our 92 Buick LeSabre over 25,000 miles on a Roadmaster dolly without any problems.

The Buick weighed 3740 lbs and the dolly another 750 lbs for a total of 4490 lbs. The Roadmaster dolly is equiped with drum brakes. While disk brakes are nice a dolly with drum brakes will certainly do a fine job. You may find the shoes on the drum brakes need changing sooner than the pads on the disks. I would expect the shoes to last a good 60,000 miles and the pads to last around 90,000 miles.
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Old 09-08-2012, 12:48 AM   #38
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Surge brakes are standard hydraulic brakes (either disk or drum) that are activated by a master cylinder built into the tongue of the trailer or dolly...<cut for brevity>...
The downside is the initial pressure necessary to overcome the spring is constant. If you use the trailer/dolly to carry widely differing weight loads the initial brake application will be sooner with the heavier load and somewhat delayed with the lighter load. Also the brakes are only applied when the load pushes against the hitch. That means no dolly/trailer braking when stopped on an incline or at extremely low speeds....
This isn't purely accurate...Surge Brakes will engage any time there is a positive pressure on the tongue. Even braking while going uphill because there is pressure on the tongue.

Specifically, Surge Brakes will give you more braking pressure when there's more weight and less braking when there's less weight.

Two examples: 1. When I picked-up my unloaded 405lb dolly from storage to drive to where I was picking-up a tow, the brakes had a slight rust layer from a few weeks in storage...while driving there the brakes were working...exhibited by the bright shiney discs at the destination.
And 2. There is no difference in the dolly's behavior between towing my 4door SUV vs. towing a 2door compact car.

Boat trailers have surge brakes because of the BIG difference between empty and loaded...but you still need the brakes to work either way
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Old 09-08-2012, 08:09 PM   #39
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Thanks guys. Very useful information. The last thing I want to see in my Olds passing me in the ditch!! The manual of my car says that she weighs almost an even 4000 lbs but they added a lot of material to stiffen the body when they cut off the roof, so that may account for the difference in stated weight. Does anyone have any feelings about engine size when towing a car? I have a 5.7 Lt Chev V8 in my B+. Does towing tax the engine to the point that I might 'lunch' it on a hill?
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Old 09-08-2012, 10:54 PM   #40
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Thanks guys. Very useful information. The last thing I want to see in my Olds passing me in the ditch!! The manual of my car says that she weighs almost an even 4000 lbs but they added a lot of material to stiffen the body when they cut off the roof, so that may account for the difference in stated weight. Does anyone have any feelings about engine size when towing a car? I have a 5.7 Lt Chev V8 in my B+. Does towing tax the engine to the point that I might 'lunch' it on a hill?
I have towed about 5,000lb with my E250 (5.8L) and had no problems, just be sure to check the GCWR* to make sure to avoid any problems (including voided warranty)

*Gross combined weight rating - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The BIGGEST concern I have found towing is that (except for HD pick-up trucks), the weakest link is the tranny. Guessing you have an automatic like most of us, and heat is the enemy of an automatic. Most American Vans are just a box on a 1/2 ton pick-up chassis. So with a simple aftermarket tranny cooler, you can tow with little worry and few problems
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Old 09-09-2012, 06:13 PM   #41
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Towing

I too will be towing for the first time next year, I have a class A and I would like to know should I have a tranny cooler installed?
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Old 09-09-2012, 11:04 PM   #42
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I too will be towing for the first time next year, I have a class A and I would like to know should I have a tranny cooler installed?
My opinion is yes...there are very few situations where a tranny cooler isn't a good idea, and you might already have one. My Workhorse had one from the factory (part of the Allison 2100 - 6 spd).

It's easy to see if you have one...there will be heavy duty fluid lines connected to the transmission - if you have a gas powered rig, these lines will go to the front of the chassis. If you have have the cooler, you will see it on the end of the lines. If you don't have a cooler, the lines will enter just the bottom of the engine radiator, where there is an enclosed heat exchanger.

Beat of luck towing
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