Go Back   iRV2 Forums > MOTORHOME FORUMS > Toads and Motorhome Related Towing
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-12-2015, 05:21 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
RanCarr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,910
Quote:
Originally Posted by nothermark View Post
Looked at the Northern tool dolly. Here are a list of all its good features:
1. Cheap
I agree with you 100%. As he gets older he's getting frugal to the point I'm finding it difficult to reason with him or discuss buying anything with him. I can't convince him that you get what you pay for.
__________________

__________________
Retired. RVing with one husband and five cats.
1999 32' Fleetwood Southwind Class-A. Ford V10.
RanCarr is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 06-12-2015, 05:40 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
RanCarr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,910
According to the 1999 Owner's Manual for our coach, it says it can tow 5000 lbs. If the tow is over 3000 lbs, the dolly needs brakes. If under 3000 lbs it doesn't.

I don't get it but that's what it says.
__________________

__________________
Retired. RVing with one husband and five cats.
1999 32' Fleetwood Southwind Class-A. Ford V10.
RanCarr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2015, 06:05 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
jtaylor1920's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 120
When I had my class c we towed a car 4 down and I couldn't imagine doing it without the supplemental braking. If you can't get a dolly with brakes how about dropping the car before the climb and following behind the RV and hooking back up on the other side? Not a great solution but better than risking a hairy ride down a mountain.
__________________
John, Laurie & the 2 Schnauzers (Mazie & Obi)
2008 Ford F350 6.4L CC SRW
2012 Cardinal 3030RS - B&W Companion Hitch
jtaylor1920 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2015, 12:03 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Rexhall Owners Group
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Auburndale, Florida
Posts: 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by nothermark View Post
Looked at the Northern tool dolly. Here are a list of all its good features:
1. Cheap
Not if it was $1200 for one without brakes. you can buy them all day long online for $899 delivered without brakes.
__________________
Mick & Vonna, 1999 Rexhall Rexair
GRUU is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2015, 12:24 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
wa8yxm's Avatar
 
Damon Owners Club
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 22,787
There are two sets of laws that apply to towing.. "Law of the land' that is written law in a law library.. And when it comes to this type of law "Your Millage May Vary" applies.. and the comments above are mostly right so I won't add to them.

The second law is the Laws of Nature.. Specifially Physics.

One of the more intersting facts is that when wheels lock, as in a panic stop.. The size of the ride does not much matter. Oh there are tricks and methods that can shorten stopping distance. but for the most part when the wheels lock.. if you are on what is called a "Reference surface" (The one used to test this) you skid 22 feet at 20 mph. 88 feet at 40

(5.5 feet times (Speed/10) times (Speed/10) if you want to punch it into a calculator.)

With ALL WHEELS LOCKED.

But if you have wheels still turning free.. the distance goes up.. Way up, as much as 30% per US-Gear.

Now.. A dolly is not ideal. the REAR wheels are still turning free.. But most of the weight is on the dolly and those wheels should brake.

So.. I am with you Mam.. I think you should have brakes on the dolly and I you were to rear end me and I found you did not... Well.. Let's say those brakes would look downright cheap compared to what I'd do.
__________________
Home is where I park it!
wa8yxm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2015, 01:08 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
HR2004's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 450
how about taking the car off the dolly, follow the rv down the hill and reload the car on the dolly at the bottom at your convenience..
__________________
2004 Holiday Rambler DST
Jefferson City, Missouri
Navy vet 67/71 Tonkin Gulf Yacht Club
HR2004 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2015, 06:53 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
ShapeShifter's Avatar


 
Monaco Owners Club
Holiday Rambler Owners Club
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 1,632
Quote:
Originally Posted by wa8yxm View Post
With ALL WHEELS LOCKED. But if you have wheels still turning free.. the distance goes up.. Way up, as much as 30% per US-Gear.
I think you have your physics a bit jumbled, and you might be misreading the US Gear charts.

There is one coefficient of friction when the tires are rolling, called static friction when the tire contact patch is not sliding relative to the road surface. There is another coefficient of friction when the wheels are locked and the tires are sliding across the road surface, called sliding friction. Sliding friction is always less than static friction. The most efficient braking (shortest stopping distance) is when the wheels are just about to lock up, but are still turning. Apply less braking effort than necessary to lock up the wheels and your stopping distance increases because the brakes are not working to their maximum potential. Apply more braking effort than necessary to lock up the wheels and sliding friction takes over, and the stopping distance increases again.

For the shortest stopping distance, you want all wheels to be on the verge of locking up, but still rolling. This is can be hard to accomplish, which is one of the reasons that automatic antilock brakes have been mandated in most situations. (The other has to do with maintaining steering control, once your steer tires lock up you can't control your direction anymore.)

The coefficient of friction says how much friction you have between two surfaces (tire and road) as a function of the force pressing between those surfaces (weight on the wheels.) As the weight on the wheels goes up, the friction between the tire and road goes up, and the braking distance stays the same. However, you add a towed vehicle, and you are adding more mass that needs to be stopped, but because the toad has it's own wheels, you are not increasing the weight on the wheels that have the brakes. So, you've increased the weight that needs to be stopped, but not increased the friction on the wheels with brakes. That means you have the same braking ability, yet more weight, therefore you have a longer stopping distance.

The other issue is that brakes work by turning the kinetic energy of motion into heat. (The prime law of thermodynamics days energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted from one type to another.) The more work the brakes have to do to stop the vehicle, the hotter they get. The hotter they get, the less they work (because they can't absorb as much heat when hot) The brakes on a vehicle are designed to safely stop a certain amount of weight. This is called brake fade. If you go over that limit (perhaps by adding a toad with no brakes) you increase your chances of overheating your brakes and running into brake fade, which again increases your stopping distance.
__________________
Adam and Sue, and a pack of little furballs
2007 Holiday Rambler Endeavor 40PDQ Limited Edition - Cummins ISL 400
2013 Ford F-150 FX4 toad - USGear Unified Tow Brake, Roadmaster Blackhawk II Tow bar, Blue Ox baseplate
Home base near Buffalo NY, often on the road to a dog show
ShapeShifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2015, 06:55 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
ShapeShifter's Avatar


 
Monaco Owners Club
Holiday Rambler Owners Club
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 1,632
Quote:
Originally Posted by HR2004 View Post
how about taking the car off the dolly, follow the rv down the hill and reload the car on the dolly at the bottom at your convenience..
That's going to get old REAL FAST. And what about the situation where you don't realize that the hill is that long or steep until you're on it? Or if there isn't a safe place to pull over to unload the toad? I just don't see that being a practical long term solution. At least I know I wouldn't put up with it.
__________________
Adam and Sue, and a pack of little furballs
2007 Holiday Rambler Endeavor 40PDQ Limited Edition - Cummins ISL 400
2013 Ford F-150 FX4 toad - USGear Unified Tow Brake, Roadmaster Blackhawk II Tow bar, Blue Ox baseplate
Home base near Buffalo NY, often on the road to a dog show
ShapeShifter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2015, 08:09 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
Tiffin Owners Club
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Las Cruces, NM
Posts: 2,271
Two things you can do: 1) buy a plane ticket to Fla to reinforce your your position about how unsafe things are without brakes; 2) contact an attorney and get some preliminary information on divorice laws in your state.

Why put up with this aggravation?
__________________
Roger & Mary
2017 Winnebago Navion 24V
2014 Tiffin Phaeton 36GH (Sold)
luvlabs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2015, 09:37 AM   #24
Senior Member
 
Playtime III's Avatar
 
Holiday Rambler Owners Club
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Tampa FL
Posts: 640
Offer to drive the van while in the mountains to save excess wear on the expensive MH brakes. Maybe that might work with him.
__________________

__________________
2006 HR Scepter 42DSQ
Playtime IV
Holiday FL
Playtime III is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
dolly, tow, tow dolly



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Review of the ACME EZE-TOW Tow Dolly EZE Tow Vendor Spotlight (Deals, Announcements & More) 29 11-29-2017 07:45 AM
Tow Dolly and a 2014 Honda Pilot dvclepper Toads and Motorhome Related Towing 16 05-16-2015 07:44 PM
Tow DOLLY car cover / rock guard bruce Dixon Toads and Motorhome Related Towing 3 03-04-2014 05:09 PM
Please Welcome Our New Sponsor - Acme Tow Dolly DriVer RV Industry Press 11 07-24-2013 10:29 AM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:23 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.