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Old 11-21-2012, 02:17 PM   #15
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Thank you for taking the time to look at that for me
Since there is no 12v wire does anyone have any suggestions on were i can pull power from.
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Old 11-21-2012, 02:49 PM   #16
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I have pulled 12VDC for a trailer on my last 3 trucks...

The easiest way is to just add an eyelet equipped wire from the positive lead on the battery (of your choice - house or chassis) and run it to the bumper.

When adding any powered wiring in a vehicle - PLEASE - start the lead with a fused link...they are cheap but worth every penny...
Like these: Dorman Conduct-Tite! 85622 - Fusible Link Wire | O'Reilly Auto Parts

Also, a cheap alternative to buying wire from the auto parts store is low voltage wire used for landscaping lights...affordable and has super-thick insulation.
Like this: Coleman® 14/2 Low Voltage Landscape Lighting Cable - Outdoor Lighting - Ace Hardware

If you decide to pull power from the chassis battery (vs. the house systems) remember that most RV's do not have a disconnect on the starting battery, so leaving a draw on that battery could leave you stranded.

And just to say it...be sure to avoid all the hot and/or spinning parts under your motorhome and use lots of zip ties to keep the wire in-place.

Best of luck
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Old 11-21-2012, 04:34 PM   #17
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According to the Ford wiring diagrams there should be 14 wires in the factory supplied harness where the trailer socket is wired from. In the earlier model years 5 of these wires are listed as unused unless the customer purchases a towing package. Then the appropriate relays are installed in the power distribution box and all the wires are terminated.

This same harness is used at least through 2009. The only difference I can see is that in the later years they install a couple more relays in the power distribution box under the hood. One of which activates the power wire you're looking for.

This information used to be available online from the Ford Body Builders site.

https://www.fleet.ford.com/truckbbas...bodybuild.html

Unfortunately they only keep the most current manuals online. You can still write them for a free copy of the manual. It shows all the wires in the harness and all the relays and breakers in the distribution box.

I did an extensive search through the various model year diagrams for the Ford chassis on the Winnebago Industries site. I compared the 1999 F53 chassis wiring diagrams to the 2001 Ford F53 chassis wiring diagrams and 2009 F53 chassis wiring diagrams.

Manuals & Diagrams

If you want the factory original wiring to work I would either write Ford for a free copy of the 1999 Body Builders Layout book, or work through the diagrams on the Winnebago site. If you're in a hurry or don't want to spend the time you can always run your own wire.
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Old 11-21-2012, 05:14 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scarab0088 View Post
I have pulled 12VDC for a trailer on my last 3 trucks...

The easiest way is to just add an eyelet equipped wire from the positive lead on the battery (of your choice - house or chassis) and run it to the bumper.

When adding any powered wiring in a vehicle - PLEASE - start the lead with a fused link...they are cheap but worth every penny...
Like these: Dorman Conduct-Tite! 85622 - Fusible Link Wire | O'Reilly Auto Parts

Also, a cheap alternative to buying wire from the auto parts store is low voltage wire used for landscaping lights...affordable and has super-thick insulation.
Like this: Coleman® 14/2 Low Voltage Landscape Lighting Cable - Outdoor Lighting - Ace Hardware

If you decide to pull power from the chassis battery (vs. the house systems) remember that most RV's do not have a disconnect on the starting battery, so leaving a draw on that battery could leave you stranded.

And just to say it...be sure to avoid all the hot and/or spinning parts under your motorhome and use lots of zip ties to keep the wire in-place.

Best of luck
So is the house battery a better way to pull power?

The draw would only be when the trailer is connected right?

I would like to find a a power source that only runs when the RV is running but I dont think that is a option.
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Old 11-21-2012, 05:15 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hikerdogs View Post
According to the Ford wiring diagrams there should be 14 wires in the factory supplied harness where the trailer socket is wired from. In the earlier model years 5 of these wires are listed as unused unless the customer purchases a towing package. Then the appropriate relays are installed in the power distribution box and all the wires are terminated.

This same harness is used at least through 2009. The only difference I can see is that in the later years they install a couple more relays in the power distribution box under the hood. One of which activates the power wire you're looking for.

This information used to be available online from the Ford Body Builders site.

https://www.fleet.ford.com/truckbbas...bodybuild.html

Unfortunately they only keep the most current manuals online. You can still write them for a free copy of the manual. It shows all the wires in the harness and all the relays and breakers in the distribution box.

I did an extensive search through the various model year diagrams for the Ford chassis on the Winnebago Industries site. I compared the 1999 F53 chassis wiring diagrams to the 2001 Ford F53 chassis wiring diagrams and 2009 F53 chassis wiring diagrams.

Manuals & Diagrams

If you want the factory original wiring to work I would either write Ford for a free copy of the 1999 Body Builders Layout book, or work through the diagrams on the Winnebago site. If you're in a hurry or don't want to spend the time you can always run your own wire.
I looked on the website and it gave me a huge list of Winnebago models. Any suggestions on which one would have a F53 chassis
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Old 11-21-2012, 06:31 PM   #20
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Trailer wiring from Winnebago

-twitch-, Attached is a Winnebago diagram of the rear lights and trailer connector on a 1999 Adventurer with a F-53 Chassis. The wires that are not used other than the white one would be to small for the +12V wire. The white wire is ground. The best way is to run your on wire. What will you be using the +12V for? I just wired a brake controller in my 2012 Jeep wrangler and I had to run the +12V line. It is use to charge the break away battery on the trailer. I used a auto reset 40amp breaker, a relay tired to hot when running, and ran #10 wire to the trailer connector. This way it is only hot with the engine is running. Which battery to use depends on your use.
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Old 11-21-2012, 06:56 PM   #21
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-twitch-, Attached is a Winnebago diagram of the rear lights and trailer connector on a 1999 Adventurer with a F-53 Chassis. The wires that are not used other than the white one would be to small for the +12V wire. The white wire is ground. The best way is to run your on wire. What will you be using the +12V for? I just wired a brake controller in my 2012 Jeep wrangler and I had to run the +12V line. It is use to charge the break away battery on the trailer. I used a auto reset 40amp breaker, a relay tired to hot when running, and ran #10 wire to the trailer connector. This way it is only hot with the engine is running. Which battery to use depends on your use.

I am using to tow a car trailer. I am running the 12V wire because that's what the 7 blade plug said it needed. I have no brake away. It is for the lights and electronic brakes on the trailer.
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Old 11-21-2012, 08:35 PM   #22
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Brake Wiring

-twitch-, It is not for running lights or brakes. I understand you have electric brakes on you car hauler trailer. That is wired with the Blue wire to pin 7 (Electric Brakes) and comes from your brake controller. The +12V pin 4 is used to supply 12 volts to the trailer for Break away kit, interior lights and/or other battery charging.
I do believe you are require to have a safety break away system with your electric brakes if you trailer is over 3500# loaded.
Attached is a electric brake only drawing.
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Old 11-21-2012, 09:22 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -twitch- View Post
So is the house battery a better way to pull power?

The draw would only be when the trailer is connected right?

I would like to find a a power source that only runs when the RV is running but I dont think that is a option.
Yes, a draw from the house battery bank would be best if you don't tap into a switched circuit.

But, if you are able to search for an alternative switched circuit, then that's good too...just a little more diffecult to set-up.

However, if you dont need the 12volt power in your trailer, just skip it. All the other wires have a dedicated purpose, but the 12 volt line is just for things like interior lights, charging your toys in the trailer and such.

It's all in what you want...best of luck.
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Old 11-21-2012, 09:57 PM   #24
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I am using to tow a car trailer. I am running the 12V wire because that's what the 7 blade plug said it needed. I have no brake away. It is for the lights and electronic brakes on the trailer.
Let's back up to the begining. I think you're confusing some of the terms being used. If all you want to do is power the electric brakes, tail lights, and brake lights on your trailer you have already identified all the wires you need.

The wires for the brake lights and tail lights are already in the socket at the rear of the motorhome. You found the wire in the harness labeled "electronic brakes". This is the "power wire" the instructions are referring to for the 7 pin socket. This wire needs to be extended and terminated on terminal #2 in the trailer hitch socket.

For simplicity sake I would remove the original socket at the rear of the coach and replace it with your new 7 pin socket. You're already going to have to take the original socket apart to terminate the brake power wire so it would eliminate several additional potential problem connections between the original socket and the adaptor by just replacing it.

The blue power wire will only be hot at the socket when the trailer brake controller is installed and you step on the brake pedal in the motorhome when the motorhome is decelerating.

The brake controller needs several conditions to pass current to the brakes through the blue wire. First it uses a built in motion detector (deceleratometer) to know when wnd how fast the motorhome is slowing down. It also needs a signal from the brake light switch in the motorhome to know you've actually applied the brakes.

You also have to set the dial (wheel) on the controller for the maximum voltage you want to go to the trailer brakes. For example if you set the maximum voltage to 8 volts thet's the maximum that will be sent under panic stop conditions. If you stop under normal conditions the controller will determine the rate of deceleration an apply brake voltage accordingly.

The plug on the trailer is in all likelyhood wired like the standard schemaitc Scarab0088 posted for the 7 pin trailer end. You need to open the original socket on the motorhome and remove the wires 1 at a time. They should match the schematic Scarab 0088 posted for the 6 pin car end. As you remove them label them to avoid confusion when moving them to the new 7 pin socket. Then terminate each of the wires in the new 7 pin socket per the 7 way car end schematic.

Disregard my previous post about the "power wire". I thought you were also looking for a wire to power internal lights or charge a battery in your trailer. This wire is present in the harness but has nothing to do with the brakes or external lights.

As I said earlier you have already iidentified all the wires you need for brakes and external lighting on the trailer. Don't be discouraged because you can't find power at the blue brake wire when the motorhome is setting in the drive. Once it's wired it'll work just fine when the motorhome is decelerating and you're stepping on the brake.
I would initially set the maximum voltage on the controller at 6 volts or less for testing purposes. When I pull an empty trailer weighing 2100 lbs behind my Ford truck that's enough voltage to feel the trailer stopping without skidding the tires.
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