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Old 12-10-2013, 06:23 PM   #15
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Be careful because older Wranglers like our 2005 have locking steering wheels. Twice now we have had that lock while towing. I religiously watch as DH drives forward to make sure the wheels turn and steering wheel turn yet the thing locked up again. 1st time it cost us $600 for two new front tires and 3 days stuck in Canton Tx waiting for them. This latest time we heard it soon enough to save them. We are now looking for a newer Wrangler with no locking steering wheel as we were told they can't disconnect the thing!
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Old 12-10-2013, 09:18 PM   #16
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Here's a link to the owners manuals page on the Jeep website.

Jeep Owners | Download an Owners Manual 2004 - 2011 | Jeep

They have all the owners manuals in pdf format from 2004 to the present. In section 5 (Starting and Operating) there's a sub section entitled "Recreational Towing" in each manual. It tells you exactly which ones can be towed 4 down and how to do it.

I would stick with the TJ or newer series if you intend to use it off road. They are lower, wider and more stable.
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Old 12-10-2013, 11:28 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plasma800 View Post
i'd be hot on the trail of something like this. inexpensive, but this cj is serious in the 4x4 dept.

1985 Jeep CJ 4WD CJ7 - Inventory - Select Jeeps Inc - Jeep Wranglers in League City, Texas

There is just no way I could stomach paying 28k for a lightly used, newer wrangler. I think it's way too much money for a not as great as it could be vehicle. But I would pay 12k for a CJ! But this would be simply a "utility" vehicle, it's not a grocery getter for sure. I would use it for towing and going.

I'm seeing 2011 models close to 26 - 28k and 2005's in the 16k range EEK! 16 grand is just too much for a 2005 wrangler IMHO, they just aren't THAT great.

NOW, this is interesting
2005 Jeep Wrangler 2dr X - Inventory - Select Jeeps Inc - Jeep Wranglers in League City, Texas

But still, it has 113k miles on it and costs 12.5k??? And that's why I went with the subie... 34k miles, 2010, and I paid 16k for the car, and it's mint! a/c works, heat works, easy to drive, and rugged. PLUS it makes a very good grocery getter back at home base. My wife can drive it, and it's nice inside, well thought out.

A jeep of the same condition is easily 28k to 30k, so unless I needed the serious off roading (which to be honest, I REALLY wanted).... but when It came down to it, I figured if I were to off road, it would be very limited, and the extra dough just ended up not being worth it to me. The subie will handle some limited mud and water fairly well.. I'm not going to be rock climbing period soo....
Plasma800,

Yep, that CJ is a nice one alright. But, just for your info and any one else that might be considering a CJ model, while the can be towed, in all reality it is for short distances without a timely startup and running through some gears. The reason is, a very large percentage of the later CJs came with what's called the model 300 transfer case. That transfer case is a cast iron, gear driven transfer case. And, the oiling of all the gears and shafts is primarily done from it being DRIVEN, not being towed.

You see, as you most likely know, there's different shafts and gears being turned when under power than vs just being towed. And those gears etc. have the ability to "sling" the oil to other shafts and gears which, keeps the whole thing from grenading. But, when it's towed, especially in the neutral positions (which is the only position it can be in to be flat towed) it's not turning the appropriate gears to sling the oil around in there. And, that's why it's real important to start the Jeep up and put it in gear which, well spin the appropriate shaft and gears to sling what's needed for it to be continued to be flat towed for a while.

We've towed (7) different Jeeps over the years. Three CJs, two YJs, and two TJs. When we first started Jeeping, we had a CJ-5 which, had the model 20 transfer case. It too is not supposed to be flat towed for great distances. When on trips, we'd stop for fuel in the motor home and also start the Jeeps up to circulate the oil in the transfer cases. We had 10-12 motor homes, all towing Jeep CJs, from San Diego to Moab UT and, we'd all stop for fuel and start up the Jeeps.

But, in the later YJs, they changed to the model 231 Transfer case. Those are aluminum and, are chain driven. They run ATF for lube in those models. And, they have a built in lube pump just inside the rear output housing that circulates the ATF, even when being towed. So, those, simply because of that feature, would be better than a CJ for a choice for a toad.

But, the TJ, which utilizes the same transfer case, has a built in, much better ride due to a complete suspension change. Yep, they're more expensive but, there's reasons for that. Now, depending on just how much one plans on good off roading and, more a insurance policy to get back home from a trip in the outback, I'd recommend an early '04 or '05 TJ Rubicon. Those are way better setup from the factory for great jeeping. And, those models come with what's known as the 241 OR transfer case. That model has a 4:1 low range in it for some serious, ultra finesse, slow speed (up hill, down hill or in tight/challenging terrain) four wheel drive stuff.

And, those also come with Dana 44 Differentials, both front and rear, locking differentials front and rear and, also a limited slip, in the rear only.

Now, those will set you back a bit more but, it all depends on just what the intended purpose of the toad/jeep is going to be used for. If very mild, occasional off roading/exploring is intended, then the "X" model of the TJ style will do just fine.

But, whatever the OP chooses, yep, if it's to a be a four wheel drive, it must be able to be placed in neutral, be it an "electronic shift" or, manual shift. Good luck.
Scott
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Old 12-11-2013, 06:43 AM   #18
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Do a search on here for "towing guide". You will find a lot of cars that are towable other than just a Jeep.
If you really need a Jeep where you are going it is a great choice. If you don't need one, you are stuck driving a Jeep all the time.
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Old 12-11-2013, 07:20 AM   #19
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We have a 2007 Wrangler Sahara 4 door with automatic transmission. I dunno if all 2007 Wranglers have the ignition locks removed but mine does, I think from 2008 on any Wrangler that is 4 wheel drive capable has no ignition lock. We have a Blue Ox tow bar and base plate. We also have a separate circuit installed for the tail light. Our procedure to prepare for towing is:
(1) Connect the tow bar
(2) Get in the Jeep with engine running & Tranny in park, put the transfer case in neutral
(3) Shut down the engine and place the gear shift lever to park
(4) Remove the key from the ignition

After that I install the Brake Buddy. There is no need to fool with fuses. If we are going long distances with several overnight stops I will run the jeep for a while to put a charge back into the battery as my auxiliary brake system uses the Jeeps battery. The brake lights power is supplied from the coach.
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Old 12-11-2013, 08:31 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FIRE UP View Post
Plasma800,

Yep, that CJ is a nice one alright. But, just for your info and any one else that might be considering a CJ model, while the can be towed, in all reality it is for short distances without a timely startup and running through some gears. The reason is, a very large percentage of the later CJs came with what's called the model 300 transfer case. That transfer case is a cast iron, gear driven transfer case. And, the oiling of all the gears and shafts is primarily done from it being DRIVEN, not being towed.

You see, as you most likely know, there's different shafts and gears being turned when under power than vs just being towed. And those gears etc. have the ability to "sling" the oil to other shafts and gears which, keeps the whole thing from grenading. But, when it's towed, especially in the neutral positions (which is the only position it can be in to be flat towed) it's not turning the appropriate gears to sling the oil around in there. And, that's why it's real important to start the Jeep up and put it in gear which, well spin the appropriate shaft and gears to sling what's needed for it to be continued to be flat towed for a while.

We've towed (7) different Jeeps over the years. Three CJs, two YJs, and two TJs. When we first started Jeeping, we had a CJ-5 which, had the model 20 transfer case. It too is not supposed to be flat towed for great distances. When on trips, we'd stop for fuel in the motor home and also start the Jeeps up to circulate the oil in the transfer cases. We had 10-12 motor homes, all towing Jeep CJs, from San Diego to Moab UT and, we'd all stop for fuel and start up the Jeeps.

But, in the later YJs, they changed to the model 231 Transfer case. Those are aluminum and, are chain driven. They run ATF for lube in those models. And, they have a built in lube pump just inside the rear output housing that circulates the ATF, even when being towed. So, those, simply because of that feature, would be better than a CJ for a choice for a toad.

But, the TJ, which utilizes the same transfer case, has a built in, much better ride due to a complete suspension change. Yep, they're more expensive but, there's reasons for that. Now, depending on just how much one plans on good off roading and, more a insurance policy to get back home from a trip in the outback, I'd recommend an early '04 or '05 TJ Rubicon. Those are way better setup from the factory for great jeeping. And, those models come with what's known as the 241 OR transfer case. That model has a 4:1 low range in it for some serious, ultra finesse, slow speed (up hill, down hill or in tight/challenging terrain) four wheel drive stuff.

And, those also come with Dana 44 Differentials, both front and rear, locking differentials front and rear and, also a limited slip, in the rear only.

Now, those will set you back a bit more but, it all depends on just what the intended purpose of the toad/jeep is going to be used for. If very mild, occasional off roading/exploring is intended, then the "X" model of the TJ style will do just fine.

But, whatever the OP chooses, yep, if it's to a be a four wheel drive, it must be able to be placed in neutral, be it an "electronic shift" or, manual shift. Good luck.
Scott
See.. it gets tricky haha
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Old 12-11-2013, 08:49 AM   #21
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Suzuki Vitara if looking for new.
Chevy Tracker if looking for used.
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Old 12-11-2013, 10:16 AM   #22
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Not all JEEPS can be towed 4 down..

Requireements:

Jeep: 4WD manual transfer case, Tranny can be auto or manual but the transfer case MUST be manual... NOTE that there are some manual transfer case that are NOT recomended for towing but those are older units not likely to be on your radar.

Add-ons
Base plate and tow bars
Aux brake system
Tow lights.

Towing other vehicles... Other vehicles can often be towed some by adding just the tow bar, brakes and lights as above, some by adding additional hardware..

Remco towing (Store : Remco if it translates) offers this additional hardware

LP-1 Lube Pump (What I am using now) is an electric pump that circulates transmission fluid through the transmission to keep it properly lubricated, YOU tow with the tranny in NEUTRAL.

Axle lock: Used on my former towed, A front wheel drive with enough clearance to let me use it, This replaces one of teh half axles.. When "Locked" it is just like the factory part, when "unlocked" the end of the axle turns free, basically turning the front wheel on that side into a free wheeling rear tire. The other wheel does turn the differential but the transmission remains in PARK while towing.

Drive Shaft Disconnect: Same idea, rear wheel drive.

Some cars, simply can not be towed.

To find out if YOURS can... Go to the web site I liked to and follow the prompts.

NOTE: LP-1 installed is around 15-17 hundred dollars

Base plate about 500, installed.

It has been long enough since I paid for tow bars I don't know

LP-1 comes with tow light adapters so at least you don't have to buy those.
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Old 12-11-2013, 03:53 PM   #23
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I read the manual before buying my Ford Escape in 2011...said it could be towed 4 down...NOT...read on blogs about burned up transmissions...so check blogs, manuals are not always right either...
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Old 12-11-2013, 04:54 PM   #24
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I tow a 2000 Dodge Dakota Quad cab 4x4
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Old 12-12-2013, 10:18 AM   #25
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What does it need to be towed. Transmission ( manual or automatic 2 wheel or 4 wheel drive ) etc.
Wranglers 4 x 4 are good to go, manual or auto and the later model JK's are without a steering lock to contend with. Best thing is that the vehicle is ready for any kind of terrain, even though the Rubicon Trail or Moab, UT, may not be in your plans.
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