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Old 05-01-2013, 12:01 PM   #1
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how to check/set new class c tire pressures

I'm comfortable with all systems on my new class c with the exception of checking & setting the tire pressures. The tires & wheels are huge & I've never owned a DRW vehicle. My question deals with exactly what gauge & compressor is recommended to perform this critical routine. Are there any videos that can assist me with this task.

Thanks!
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Old 05-01-2013, 05:08 PM   #2
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Step 1 - Load the MH up as if you are going on a journey - including occupants, food, water and fuel
Step 2 - find a weighbridge that will allow you to weigh each of the four corners separately
Step 3 -Using the heaviest side of each axle, use the weight to determine the recommended tyre pressure from the tyre manufacturer's load tables.

Step 4 - ....
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Old 05-02-2013, 06:04 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Lee View Post
Step 1 - Load the MH up as if you are going on a journey - including occupants, food, water and fuel
Step 2 - find a weighbridge that will allow you to weigh each of the four corners separately
Step 3 -Using the heaviest side of each axle, use the weight to determine the recommended tyre pressure from the tyre manufacturer's load tables.

Step 4 - ....

This exactly what I was told to do by a Michelin Rep. The only thing I would add would be to get extensions of some kind (solid preferable) to make checking your pressures easy!
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Old 05-02-2013, 11:35 PM   #4
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Should have been covered on your walk through with the dealer.
My tires were not either.
I prefer digital gauges and since I couldn't find one long enough I had extensions installed which make the inner rear wheel easier to fill and read.
There are several small compressors available with reviews online and don't think that a small 12 V will work. I had one rated to 300lbs and it barely made 50 on my travel trailer. I'll also follow this thread and heed advice from more experienced rvers.
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Old 05-03-2013, 12:25 PM   #5
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Are your duals set up so that both valve stems are accessible from the outer rim? If not, you may want to get a set of Dually Valves installed. Makes the job 100% easier. I bought mine from www.sixrobblees.com. They are solid (not braided) extenders made by Borg.
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Old 05-06-2013, 08:43 PM   #6
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Get you an air chuck and pressure gauge made for trucks. You will be able to fill both inner and outer tires easily. I have a small compressor that will pump 155 psi. I just plug it in to the motor home and run the generator. Get yourself a tire knocker. Once you get the right tire pressure use it to thump your tires and listen to how they sound. Then you won't need to test the psi every time you stop. Only need to thump the tires. If you hear a big difference in the sound of a single tire then check the pressure. Old trucker trick told to you by an old trucker.

Mark
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Old 05-06-2013, 08:58 PM   #7
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One of the best investments I have made are Dually Valve stems. They are solid metal valve stems that replace the OEM valve stems. You do have to remove the tires to install them.

Dually valve kits for Motor-homes, Busses and 6-wheeled chassis

As the other members have stated you still need to get your coach weighed at all four corners and get the recommended air pressure from the manufacturer of the tires.

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Old 06-07-2013, 06:00 PM   #8
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The biggest issue I dealt with was the rear wheel simulators. I had to contact the factory to determine whether or not they were screwed on. They weren't, they're hub caps. Removing the rear wheel simulators provided improved access to the valves. I visited a "Pilot" store and purchased a truck type straight on dual foot tire pressure gauge and air chuck. Maximum air pressure on my tires is 80 lbs, so I purchased a 110 lbs air compressor at "Wally World". Now that I've obtained the correct tools and have become familiar with the valve locations, checking the rear tire pressures is fairly straightforward. I haven't decided whether to pull the the wheel covers monthly or just leave them off.

I inquired about valve extensions with my dealer and they declined to install any due to liability issues. At some point in the future I'll probably visit a truck tire dealer to get the metal valve extensions installed.
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Old 07-24-2013, 10:19 PM   #9
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You might also think about getting a Tire Minder, would never go on a trip without it.
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Old 07-24-2013, 10:34 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Campingman View Post
Get yourself a tire knocker. Once you get the right tire pressure use it to thump your tires and listen to how they sound. Then you won't need to test the psi every time you stop. Only need to thump the tires. If you hear a big difference in the sound of a single tire then check the pressure. Old trucker trick told to you by an old trucker.

Mark
One of the truck driver magazines did a test some years ago. Out of 50 professional truck drivers only 2 could tell a dangerously low tire (20% low) from one that was correct. Leads me to believe that an RV driver won't be able to tell either.
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Old 07-25-2013, 05:35 PM   #11
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Tire Man tire valves. Tire-Man: Products
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Old 07-30-2013, 04:19 PM   #12
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I've decided to permanently remove the simulators and allow easier access to the tire valves. The wheels don't look bad after a little touch up paint.

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Old 08-17-2013, 02:16 PM   #13
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I have a 31M. Weighs 14200 configured. I run 75 rear and 70 front.
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