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Old 11-11-2019, 03:18 PM   #1
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Kodiak brake issues.

More specifically, the seized caliper issue, and "potential" recall.
Had never heard of this, nore suspected it with our Seneca. But, near Birmingham, Al. near Bessemer, we pulled in, to park for the night. Everything seemed fine, until we left the cab, and got about halfway through the coach and were met by the unmistakable smell of burned brakes. Jumped out and got to the driver's-side rear wheels. Things were pretty ht!
Started looking for a place to get it fixed. Found one in Bessemer. Called our son, Lance, in Vt and he got in touch with this page. Sent me a copy of a7 page thread on this problem, from 2008-2009. I've read through it, and found it informative, but, unless I just plain missed it, I never found any info on who to call to - 1: Find out if I'm the owner of record for this 2008 Kodiak, and-2: Find out if I'm eligible for coverage on any recall. This truck has 27000 miles on it. It turned 9000 miles when I pulled it out of an RV dealers yard in early Dec, 2016. It sat most of its life, till then, parked somewhere in th RGV.
I climb out, at every stop, and check all my tires and hubs for heat, with my fingers. It's saved a lot of hassle, over the years, as has my habit of maintaining a minimum 5 second interval. I probably count those seconds, in my head, several-hundred times a day. I've used 3 of those 5 seconds on many an occasion, and marvel that I don't see a lot more wrecks caused by drivers, especially truckers, who choose to tailgate.
Anyhow, it was an (almost) complete surprise, that a caliper chose, to drag and overheat when it did, as we were something like 1600 miles from home, on our way to Brownsville, and were driving about the same 400+ miles/day
, every day. One would think that this would more likely happen the first day out, having sat, idle, most of the Summer. The (almost) surprising thing about this, is, that 2 days before, the ABS light came on. No stopping, for miles, before I could exit I81, and when I did, there were no hot brakes, or no indicators of which sensor could be the culprit.
The trailer brakes are always working, always hooked up, and have always been noticeably effective.
The up-shot of the service facility stay? Twenty-seven-hundred-and-forty-seven dollars! For a new caliper, new flex-hoses for both sides, new bearing, new seal ($80.00!), fluid flush, and rear-end oil change. Get this; they "turned" the old disk! How the heck does a disk get that hot without [not] ruining the temper?
Then, there's the 5 nights of living in a fiea-bag motel, and meals. Ate up over 3 grand, total.
So, that's my story. Any and all info on what path to take for the other 3 corners, and who to call for contacts with Kodiak-WH - GM people will be very much appreciated.
Thank you.
DW
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Old 11-13-2019, 03:42 PM   #2
"Formerly Diplomat Don"
 
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Your post is a little hard to read, but the bottom line, it looks like you're asking two questions. Is there a recall? What to do with the other three wheels.

Simply take your VIN to a GM dealer and have them run it for you. If there is a recall, they will have it. It may or may not still be active. Active meaning they'll fix it, or inactive, which means you're on your own.

It sounds like you're kind of surprised that an 11 year old truck would need it's brakes serviced. If it were me, I would have all four wheels (brakes) serviced. I would also look at replacing any rubber hosing and then flush the entire system.
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Old 11-13-2019, 05:11 PM   #3
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Thank you for your reply.
Both flex hoses (rubber) on the rear were replaced. The system was flushed with five quarts of fluid, supplied by the local (Bessemer, Al) dealer. The other 3 calipers look brand new, with only 27000 miles on them, however, I fully intend to replace them, and the front flex hoses, either through the recall, or on my own.
The potential recall on Workhorse brakes became known to me, when my son sent me a 7 page copy of a thread on that subject, which appeared in irv2 in 2009. That thread, and the link therein lead me to join this page.
Thanks again. DW
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Old 12-27-2019, 07:33 PM   #4
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I believe a seized caliper is caused by one of two situations. One is corrosion built up casing the caliper to seize. Two excessive moisture in the system. Old brake fluid can absorb moisture, when the brake caliper gets hot the moisture can boil creating even more brake pressure. This can create even more heat. New fluid should correct this issue. Replacing calipers may be a waist of money.
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Old 12-27-2019, 08:49 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edenns View Post
I believe a seized caliper is caused by one of two situations. One is corrosion built up casing the caliper to seize. Two excessive moisture in the system. Old brake fluid can absorb moisture, when the brake caliper gets hot the moisture can boil creating even more brake pressure. This can create even more heat. New fluid should correct this issue. Replacing calipers may be a waist of money.
Boiling brake fluid will not force the brakes to drag.

When you take your foot off the pedal, the fluid and or boiled water ( Steam ) will just push back to the master cylinder reservoir. There is no check valves in disk brake systems.

The issue with boiled fluid is, that after the steam expands and pushes the fluid back to the master cylinder, the next time you step on the brake its like having air in the lines until the fluid cools and the brake goes to the floor.
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Old 12-28-2019, 04:48 PM   #6
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Dick, here is a point that the others are glossing over: Most disc brake designs today do not have pistons to press the brake pads onto both sides of the disc (rotor). An almost universal cost reduction is to have piston(s) on just one side of the caliper, then attach the caliper so it will slide and 'grab' the rotor with both brake pads (the pad opposite the piston doesn't move until the caliper itself moves). As another poster mentioned, the calipers must be periodically lubricated so they will slide. Responding to your statement about 'everything working until it didn't', that's exactly what happened; one of the calipers was sliding until it didn't and the pad on one side continued to rub and get hot. This was not a recall fault, just a deferred maintenance issue. This happened to me also but my TPMS alerted me to the temperature increase. The offending caliper moved sufficiently for me to get home where I had all rotors, calipers, pads, and hoses replaced at my favorite shop for ~ $1200.

Quote:
Originally Posted by edenns View Post
I believe a seized caliper is caused by one of two situations. One is corrosion built up casing the caliper to seize. Two excessive moisture in the system. Old brake fluid can absorb moisture, when the brake caliper gets hot the moisture can boil creating even more brake pressure. This can create even more heat. New fluid should correct this issue. Replacing calipers may be a waist of money.
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