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Old 03-20-2017, 07:18 PM   #29
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It is recommended to use a 90 angle off of the RV. Connect the filter as close to the RV as possible near the 90 elbow, NOT AT THE HYDRANT. The pressure regulator is directly attached to the hydrant, next is the hose to the filter which is connected to the 90 elbow which enters the RV.
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Old 03-22-2017, 08:34 PM   #30
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First Aid Kit, especially with kids around. I put mine in the first overhead cabinet aft of the coach door and used my Brother Label maker to make a red on white label, red crosses with "FIRST AID KIT INSIDE" between the red crosses and installed it on the cabinet door. Easy for anyone to find it that way.

Orange hi vis vest ($10 at Harbor Freight) for roadside emergencies.

Wheel chocks, at least two, if a motorhome, probably four.

Flashlights, lots of them. As mentioned, batteries for all the different things.

A dedicated digital camera, Cannon, Olympus, etc pocket camera. You really don't want your cell phone batteries to go dead taking pics, and the cameras for the most part take better pictures anyhow. Get one that uses AA batteries, not something special.

Small Binoculars. I have two, the real small ones, and a larger 7x35 or something close to that.

Spare potable water hose, in case you get a site where the faucet is ill positioned for your camper.

Electric hotplate. If in a campground with electricity, why burn your propane cooking. Use the hotplate, save the gas. Was looking at the web site for Palo Duro Canyon State Park in Texas, right now they have a total open flame ban, no propane or butane or other types of stoves, no Coleman lanterns, nata, nothing.

Fires of all types are prohibited until further notice due to extreme fire danger weather. This includes wood, charcoal, propane, butane, candles, or any other type of flame in fire rings, waist-high grills, or devices brought in by visitors.

That hotplate would sure be handy there right now. Bought an Oster solid surface one at Ollies for $19 the other day. Same with an electric griddle, bought one at Walmart for $19 a while back.

14 and 12 gauge extension cords and 3 way power taps (for the hotplate on the picnic table and anything else you need it for.)

Spare plug to go on the end of your shore power cord. If you plug into a pedestal that has a worn or corroded receptacle, the resistance can easily burn up your plug, or you trip over the cord and it breaks, or otherwise is rendered unusable. Leviton TT30 plug is about $12 at Home Depot, and only takes a pocket knife and a screwdriver to install. I also carry a spare receptacle. If the campground has someone to change it, and no part.... well, lookee here, I just happen to have one in my tool bag.

Fuses, automotive type (either regular ATO or ATM miniature, whichever you have in your vehicle and the house 12v panel, most likely regular ATO.) 120 piece assortments on Amazon for less than $10.

If you use campground showers, Crocks, or beach sandals (handy for wear anytime) and a plastic carry caddy for all your shower stuff.

Spare bulbs, especially tail light bulbs for the trailer or tow vehicle or motorhome. Nothing worse than a evening or night departure only to discover one is burned out.

LED camp lanterns, very bright, use batteries sparingly, I bought several of these at Lowes on clearance for six or eight bucks (I guess they were just overstocked) These suckers are BRIGHT!!!! Gave away some to my neighbors as door prizes at the HOA meeting last year. We have lots of power outages here, but I kept three for myself.

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Utilitech-LED-Lantern/50017012

Charles
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Old 03-22-2017, 08:42 PM   #31
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It helps us if we pre-make some food at home. Things like deviled eggs (great breakfast), some type of salad (ie potato, egg, pasta, or chicken, etc).
If we will travel quite a ways, at home we grill some food (hamburgers, hot dogs, bacon, sausage etc) and freeze it. Thaw and either heat in microwave or a grill).

We bring fresh fruit, and veggies washed at home. Sometimes (at home) we made up a dinner for the crock pot. That worked out when we would be away from the rig all day, but wanted to enjoy a hot, nutritious meal upon returning for the evening.

We can easily have a meal right away without a lot of prep time. Hungry people can get very crabby. :-)

Make it fun and relaxing!! Things will get easier when you have some experience under your belt.

Mike & Leslie
29 ft Winnebago Minnie Class C
Excellent food ideas. I saw a crockpot BREAKFAST receipe that sounded good too.

Slow Cooker Overnight Breakfast Casserole - Johnsonville.com

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Old 03-23-2017, 10:07 PM   #32
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I'm new to the forum, but lifelong camper. Lots of good suggestions here, but I would add: Hand soap, scissors, duct tape, quart sized zip lock bags, mason jars for "overnight oats", meat tenderizer (make paste with water for bug bites..wonderful), tools (automotive and household), small electric portable heater (when in park where electric is included which saves propane), couple of bungee cords, spare set of keys for EVERYTHING, sunscreen and all of your childlike joy for adventure!
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Old 03-24-2017, 11:55 AM   #33
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I put this together a couple of years ago. Hope it helps!
I dont agree with the weight of the filter, regulator, and portion of hose all placing upward pressure on your water connection. Id recommend a 90 deg brass elbow joint thereby allowing all the weight to hang down. The bonus is not getting clotheslined in the middle of the night should the need arise to access that side of the coach😊
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I concur a good quality multimeter is invaluable to test pedestal voltage before plugging in, battery voltage, etc.
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Old 03-24-2017, 12:31 PM   #34
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I dont agree with the weight of the filter, regulator, and portion of hose all placing upward pressure on your water connection. Id recommend a 90 deg brass elbow joint thereby allowing all the weight to hang down. The bonus is not getting clotheslined in the middle of the night should the need arise to access that side of the coach😊
That was actually the first time I used the water filter and have since installed it on the other end of the hose and I now do use an elbow joint at the RV water intake.

The photo was just to illustrate the things needed for newbies.
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Old 03-25-2017, 07:36 AM   #35
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WOW! After looking at some of the suggestions on here I think anyone would have to remove the bed, sofa and refrigerator and toss them out just to have room for everything. You'd end up with a rolling hardware store.
Review the lists and decide what you think you really need, then pick a few things you might need and head out. Start out with what you need to hook up to a pedestal for power and water as well as the necessary hoses and connections to hook to the sewer connection or to use the dump station.
A few basic tools would be handy but you don't need a complete mechanic's tool set with a work bench.
As you pack the camper make a list of what you have packed and where it is. There is nothing worse than knowing you have something you need but can't find it. Keep the list current as you add items. From time to time review the list. If after time you find you are dragging things along you have never needed take them out and make space for things you will use. Don't just pack things because it makes you feel good having them with you. In time you will find your comfort zone. We all have our pet wants and needs. The choice is yours.
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Old 03-26-2017, 02:43 PM   #36
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I am blown away by all the responses. A lifetime of useful tips. I really appreciate everyone and this forum. The weather is getting nice here in Tennessee....camping soon.
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Old 03-26-2017, 02:49 PM   #37
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Don't forget little things like can openers, and other kitchen implements
Cork remover for the wine bottles, yep we did it once!! If you go for boxed or screw top wines then not needed.
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Old 03-26-2017, 04:08 PM   #38
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Cork remover for the wine bottles, yep we did it once!! If you go for boxed or screw top wines then not needed.
Talk about forgetting things! We bought a frozen pizza to have for dinner, but we forgot to buy and bring a pizza pan on the trip. That has since been rectified.

Another handy item to bring: a Swiss Army knife (some do have cork screws).
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Old 03-26-2017, 04:23 PM   #39
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In the very beginning I meticulously packed to ensure I could take care of any situation. I was the Inspector Gadget of RV'ing.
As the years went on I have gone in the opposite direction. Light and nimble.
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Old 03-27-2017, 08:05 AM   #40
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Sometimes I think it would be easier to jack up my house, put a few axles under it and take it along. But then what I would need would be in my garage at home or my pole barn anyway.
I keep it to a minimum and try to get by until I get home then tackle the job.
I don't need a corkscrew. I drink beer and have fingers so I'm all set.
Lynn
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Old 03-27-2017, 09:05 AM   #41
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From my experience is hasn't been not taking enough "stuff" but too much. That being said there will always be something you wished you had brought. I would suggest you figure out what you really need not what you have at home. You can always buy stuff along the way if you really need it. In addition to space limitations in the RV you also have weight limitations. Stuff weighs more than you think. It is a really good idea to have the RV weighed after everything is on board, inc and how well balanced it is. Including the passengers to find how much it weighs and how well it is balanced it is. Just my 2 cents worth.
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