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Old 09-16-2019, 07:40 PM   #1
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New MH Tire Recommendations?

TLDR - Blew a tire, need new ones, Recís?

There are probably multiple threads on this topic but my search skills are lacking - feel free to direct me....Blew an outside dual tire today so will be looking for new ones all round.

Main question - need new tires all Ďround for MH. What is the go to Brand/Make/Model, load range, etc. these days for MH tires?
Also I have read other info where folks have gone up a size to something like 215/85R16 LRE to get a little extra ground clearance. This is very appealing to me as our rigs plumbing etc. hangs very low and my driveway is very steep and I have to use wood ramps to back it in. Is going up a size a good idea? What would be the downside - I am thinking tire availability? It might be an issue as the 225/75 R16ís are standard on the E450 chassis and readily available, where the next size up 215/85R16 LRE might not be?

Rig: 2017 Leprechaun 317SA Class C 32í - original tires are LT 225/75 R16 Load Range ďEĒ. . We haul a rock crawling Jeep on a trailer so run loaded heavy - Legal and within specs, but right at the limit.

Rant - Roadside Assistance companies - we Have both Coachnet and AAA RV+ but neither one could find a local service provider to just come out and change out a tire for my spare. I ended up finding a local tire shop to come out. What the he11 good is a roadside service membership if they canít help you on a major interstate in the middle of Alabama? We werenít out in the sticks? Wonder if they will reimburse me since I had to pay out of pocket? Probably not, but they will both get an earful Rant over.

Outcome - Come to find out the inside tire was flat, had 2 splits in the sidewall . So the outside tire was carrying all the weight and probably just got hot and blew. Ended up having to put on the spare and buy 1 tire. Good news is the sidewall blew so tread didnít separate and beat the MH causing more damage.

Lesson - I donít have TPMS (maybe I need to make that investment) but I am very diligent about checking cold tire pressure every morning and keep tires at max rating. Every time we stop I visually check all of the tires and feel the temperature on each one, but I have not been bumping the inside duels. Blow out happen at 10 AM so I know the tires were good when we pulled out at 6 AM. MH is a 2017 so I assumed the tires were a couple years old. Come to find out the manufacture date on all of the tires was February of 2015. Tires were 4 1/2 years old. Also the rig is a former rental so no telling how the tires were maintained and was probably stored outside.

Any help and advice appreciated!
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Old 09-17-2019, 08:38 AM   #2
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If blowing tires due to over-load conditions, I recommend tires like THESE. I am not necessarily endorsing the brand, but rather it's extra capability. There are a number of tire manufactures offering the extra load tire. Each tire handles 500 to 600 additional pounds. Times 4 rear tires, you have an extra ton or more of capability back there. That should eliminate rear tire blow-outs from over-load conditions.

When shopping for this type of tire, be sure to select the one that gets the extra load with 83 psi, not 90 psi, because all E350/E450 steel wheels are rated for 80 psi.

If your front axle is light-weight, I would install standard "E" rated tires to avoid an unnecessary rough ride. There is no concern of mixing front tires from rear tires. Just DO NOT mix tires within each axle. The setup means DO NOT rotate tires which I do not recommend anyway.
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Old 09-17-2019, 03:49 PM   #3
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because all E350/E450 steel wheels are rated for 80 psi.
Would you please provide a source for this statement. I cannot find any source that says Ford E450 steel wheels are rated for 80 PSI. I have called two Ford Dealer Parts Departments and neither one had any idea what the wheels PSI ratings were. I know that the standard high pressure rubber/metal valve stems are rated for 80 PSI.
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Old 09-17-2019, 04:05 PM   #4
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Buy inexpensive tires and replace as a set every 5 years. Asking brand preferences is a Ford/Chevy or Blond/Redhead kind of question....Everybody has a valid opinion.
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Old 09-18-2019, 12:01 AM   #5
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One solution to your problem might be to go to a 235/85/16 if you can. That would give you another 1500 or so tire load capacity in the rear. The only issue there might be the tire spacing on the dualies. The 235 is about 3/8" wider on 6" stock rim than a 225. You would have to carefully measure between your existing tires at the bulge to see if you have enough room so they won't rub on each other.

Funny that I have a coach that weighs almost 1/2 of yours but they spec the same tire size and rating

I run Michelin on the front for comfort and Firestone Transforce HT on the rear. I have always had good luck with Firestone HT's on my work trucks and on my boat trailers.
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Old 09-18-2019, 05:30 AM   #6
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Got a blow out in my RF Michelin the other day, the tire is no longer available so I needed to buy 2 new fronts. Went with Firestone Transforce actually like the way it drives better front ends feels a little bit stiffer.
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Old 09-18-2019, 06:59 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by LOG View Post
Would you please provide a source for this statement. I cannot find any source that says Ford E450 steel wheels are rated for 80 PSI. I have called two Ford Dealer Parts Departments and neither one had any idea what the wheels PSI ratings were. I know that the standard high pressure rubber/metal valve stems are rated for 80 PSI.
Multiple forum contributors say the 80 psi rating is stamped into the steel rims, both for the E350 and E450. I never examined my own 2007 E350 rims to confirm it, but I assume it is true. I should examine my still-like-new spare tire with steel wheel.
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Old 09-18-2019, 07:38 AM   #8
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TLDR - Info on weights, loading, and tires I chose. Hopefully someone will check my math and logic and might find helpful.

Update - Thanks to Ron Dittmer I did a little more research and ran the weight numbers on my Rig and tires. No wonder we blew a rear tire. Since the tires were OE I assumed they were rated for the loads with plenty of cushion...

Motorhome Specs
GVWR 14,500 Front 5,000 Rear 9,600
GCWR 22,000
UVW 12,250
CCC 2,280
Hitch 7,500/750

As I mentioned, when we are pulling the trailer with the Jeep on it we are maxed out especially on the back axle. When we first got it I ran the fully loaded rig across the scales several trips and learned we had to be very careful what we carry, how we load MH, and how Jeep is loaded on trailer. If I load it right we are legal all round. Since then I weigh it occasionally and have found that sometimes we are a little over on the rear axle and GVWR - front axle and GCWR are good. The reasons are 1) We add some gear we think we cant live without (usually me adding heavy tool bags) and forget to subtract something of same weight, 2) It is difficult to shift weight to the front axle since all of the storage areas are in back, and 3) I struggle to keep weight off the trailer tongue - It has a tool box on the front with a winch/battery mounted in it and that is where I store straps/chains etc., and there is a very narrow window to position the Jeep so the trailer doesn't get squirrelly.

Now the numbers - The OE tires were the Michelin Defender LTX M/S LT225/75/R16 Load Range E which, from what I can tell are the most used and recommended for Class C's.

Here is where I learned thanks to Ron - The Load Index on those tires is 115 which means at max inflation of 80psi the
weight rating is 2679 # per tire.
Front - 2 tires @ 2679 = 5358# - Front axle spec is 5000# so OK as I have never been over 4500 #.
Rear Duals (couldn't find exact rating for dual setup but usually about 125 # less than max) - 4 tires @ 2554 = 10,216 # - Rear axle spec is 9,600 # so again OK but not much wiggle room.

Looking back at weight tickets, on the rare occasion when I do screw up loading and not get everything right I have been as high as 10,300 # on the rear axle. In that case I am right at or over max load for tires.

I used all this info and went shopping for tires that would give me a little more buffer on the rear axle.

1. I first looked to go up a Load Rating as some have suggested, but found a couple issues. 1) There are very limited options for size needed, 2) it sounds like the ride quality is horrible on MH's, and 3) Again thanks to Ron and others - LR F tires usually have max inflation of 90 psi or more but stock wheels and valve stems are only rated up to 80 PSI. Basically I would have to buy new wheels all around in addition to tires.

2. I learned that Nexen (Roadian CT8 HL) and Continental (VancoFourSeason) have come out with new tires designed for Commercial Vans/Trucks that have a Load Rating of 120/121 - 3086 #/3197 #. 4 of these on the back gets 12,000+ # capacity. They also have a Max inflation of 83 PSI.

I went with the Continental for the rear - made in America and lots of good reviews and recommendations. The Nexen were $100 less per tire but they are made in S. Korea and, since newly released, I couldn't find many reviews nor anyone that had personally tried them on a Class C MH. NOTE: I actually heard good things about Nexen tires in general - considered much better than other imports from China etc. and they have a better warranty than the Continentals.

I went back with the Michelin Defender LTX M/S on the front (again good rec from Ron) as the weight rating is acceptable and they will maintain as much ride quality as possible. This will mean I can't rotate them (shouldn't mix tires on same axle) but I cant find anywhere that rotating tires on MH is recommended.

Before I get lectured about intentionally operating over weight - I did not go into this to find a way to run overloaded. I have enough experience with trucks and trailers of all kinds to understand the importance of staying within specs. This is why I actually go through the trouble of weighing the rig on a regular basis and continuing to work with the loading plan. This is also why I am comfortable operating at or near the max specs - I know the MH & Trailer are well set up & maintained and the trailer is top of the line with properly set up brakes on both axles. Upgrading the tires is just another step in keeping the entire rig in the best possible condition/set up. I also know and easy answer would be to just get a big Diesel Pusher - just not in the cards...yet.

Please feel free to double check my math and logic and let me know if it is flawed.
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Old 09-18-2019, 02:17 PM   #9
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To answer the OP questions.


If concerned with tire availability LT235/85R16 LR-E why not simply call a few dealers in your area to see how long they say it would take them to get one or a pair. I see that GY, Firestone, Bridgestone & Conti all make this item so you should have little problem.


RE Wheel rating. If the wheel came OE from GM or Ford with 80 psi tires then you can be confident the wheel is rated for 80 even if not stamped. Same for the Load rating in pounds.


High Load. You really should try and have at least 10% reserve Load for each tire position.


Have you confirmed end to end load split for each axle when fully loaded. Some RVs are 500# out of balance.


"All Steel" "Commercial" tires may be able to tolerate running at 100% load better than the Polyester/Steel general use tires.


Going to larger tire would give better reserve load for the tire while still keeping below GAWR and below 50% GAWR on each end of each axle.


ALWAYSErun a TPMS that you have properly set for your conditions and be sure to test your TPMS at least once a year as I have covered in my RV Tire blog.



To all.
Please, remember that tire life is not infinite. The closer you run to load limit and the faster you run the more "life" you are "consuming" with every mile you run.
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Old 09-19-2019, 08:15 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
To answer the OP questions.


If concerned with tire availability LT235/85R16 LR-E why not simply call a few dealers in your area to see how long they say it would take them to get one or a pair. I see that GY, Firestone, Bridgestone & Conti all make this item so you should have little problem.


RE Wheel rating. If the wheel came OE from GM or Ford with 80 psi tires then you can be confident the wheel is rated for 80 even if not stamped. Same for the Load rating in pounds.


High Load. You really should try and have at least 10% reserve Load for each tire position.


Have you confirmed end to end load split for each axle when fully loaded. Some RVs are 500# out of balance.


"All Steel" "Commercial" tires may be able to tolerate running at 100% load better than the Polyester/Steel general use tires.


Going to larger tire would give better reserve load for the tire while still keeping below GAWR and below 50% GAWR on each end of each axle.


ALWAYSErun a TPMS that you have properly set for your conditions and be sure to test your TPMS at least once a year as I have covered in my RV Tire blog.



To all.
Please, remember that tire life is not infinite. The closer you run to load limit and the faster you run the more "life" you are "consuming" with every mile you run.
Thanks for the response, just a couple follow up questions.

When you say "All Steel" "Commercial" tires - can you give me a Brand/Model example? Any chance the Continentals I picked meet your def of Commercial?

On the 80 psi rating for wheels - reason I asked was some of the more "commercial" tires I looked at were 90 psi (or greater). Also looks like Michelin discontinued the Defender LTX M/S and its replacement Agilis CrossClimate is also a 90 psi tire. Sounds like if everyone in Ford E350/E450 chassis rigs want to stay with Michelin and go with the CrossClimate they will have to upgrade wheels too?

Had never thought about load diff side to side on same axle - How do I weigh the load on each individual side? All the scales I have seen (usually Cat Scales @ Loves Truck Stops) are just by axle?

Learned my lesson on no TPMS, will go on before next trip. Plan to go with the external screw on sensors. If I use the Bolt On Valve Stems (like the TR416 from your blog) can I go with the bigger/heavier flow thru style, or should I just stay with the lighter standard sensors? Also do you have a specific recommendation on TPMS Brand/Model?

Thanks again for all the help!
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Old 09-19-2019, 10:39 AM   #11
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Michelin Agilis Crossclimate has a C-Metric tire in the 225/75R16 that has a Maximum 83 PSI rating. And, the Michelin all steel commercial XPS RIB has a maximum PSI rating of 80 PSI.
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Old 09-19-2019, 12:23 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RVJeeper18 View Post
Thanks for the response, just a couple follow up questions.

When you say "All Steel" "Commercial" tires - can you give me a Brand/Model example? Any chance the Continentals I picked meet your def of Commercial?

On the 80 psi rating for wheels - reason I asked was some of the more "commercial" tires I looked at were 90 psi (or greater). Also looks like Michelin discontinued the Defender LTX M/S and its replacement Agilis CrossClimate is also a 90 psi tire. Sounds like if everyone in Ford E350/E450 chassis rigs want to stay with Michelin and go with the CrossClimate they will have to upgrade wheels too?

Had never thought about load diff side to side on same axle - How do I weigh the load on each individual side? All the scales I have seen (usually Cat Scales @ Loves Truck Stops) are just by axle?

Learned my lesson on no TPMS, will go on before next trip. Plan to go with the external screw on sensors. If I use the Bolt On Valve Stems (like the TR416 from your blog) can I go with the bigger/heavier flow thru style, or should I just stay with the lighter standard sensors? Also do you have a specific recommendation on TPMS Brand/Model?

Thanks again for all the help!
used Ezee for 4 years no issues ran over a nail and had a flat alarm worked great for me to get off highway with ease
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Old 09-19-2019, 04:12 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RVJeeper18 View Post
TLDR - Info on weights, loading, and tires I chose. Hopefully someone will check my math and logic and might find helpful.

Update - Thanks to Ron Dittmer I did a little more research and ran the weight numbers on my Rig and tires. No wonder we blew a rear tire. Since the tires were OE I assumed they were rated for the loads with plenty of cushion...

Motorhome Specs
GVWR 14,500 Front 5,000 Rear 9,600
GCWR 22,000
UVW 12,250
CCC 2,280
Hitch 7,500/750

As I mentioned, when we are pulling the trailer with the Jeep on it we are maxed out especially on the back axle. When we first got it I ran the fully loaded rig across the scales several trips and learned we had to be very careful what we carry, how we load MH, and how Jeep is loaded on trailer. If I load it right we are legal all round. Since then I weigh it occasionally and have found that sometimes we are a little over on the rear axle and GVWR - front axle and GCWR are good. The reasons are 1) We add some gear we think we cant live without (usually me adding heavy tool bags) and forget to subtract something of same weight, 2) It is difficult to shift weight to the front axle since all of the storage areas are in back, and 3) I struggle to keep weight off the trailer tongue - It has a tool box on the front with a winch/battery mounted in it and that is where I store straps/chains etc., and there is a very narrow window to position the Jeep so the trailer doesn't get squirrelly.

Now the numbers - The OE tires were the Michelin Defender LTX M/S LT225/75/R16 Load Range E which, from what I can tell are the most used and recommended for Class C's.

Here is where I learned thanks to Ron - The Load Index on those tires is 115 which means at max inflation of 80psi the
weight rating is 2679 # per tire.
Front - 2 tires @ 2679 = 5358# - Front axle spec is 5000# so OK as I have never been over 4500 #.
Rear Duals (couldn't find exact rating for dual setup but usually about 125 # less than max) - 4 tires @ 2554 = 10,216 # - Rear axle spec is 9,600 # so again OK but not much wiggle room.

Looking back at weight tickets, on the rare occasion when I do screw up loading and not get everything right I have been as high as 10,300 # on the rear axle. In that case I am right at or over max load for tires.

I used all this info and went shopping for tires that would give me a little more buffer on the rear axle.

1. I first looked to go up a Load Rating as some have suggested, but found a couple issues. 1) There are very limited options for size needed, 2) it sounds like the ride quality is horrible on MH's, and 3) Again thanks to Ron and others - LR F tires usually have max inflation of 90 psi or more but stock wheels and valve stems are only rated up to 80 PSI. Basically I would have to buy new wheels all around in addition to tires.

2. I learned that Nexen (Roadian CT8 HL) and Continental (VancoFourSeason) have come out with new tires designed for Commercial Vans/Trucks that have a Load Rating of 120/121 - 3086 #/3197 #. 4 of these on the back gets 12,000+ # capacity. They also have a Max inflation of 83 PSI.

I went with the Continental for the rear - made in America and lots of good reviews and recommendations. The Nexen were $100 less per tire but they are made in S. Korea and, since newly released, I couldn't find many reviews nor anyone that had personally tried them on a Class C MH. NOTE: I actually heard good things about Nexen tires in general - considered much better than other imports from China etc. and they have a better warranty than the Continentals.

I went back with the Michelin Defender LTX M/S on the front (again good rec from Ron) as the weight rating is acceptable and they will maintain as much ride quality as possible. This will mean I can't rotate them (shouldn't mix tires on same axle) but I cant find anywhere that rotating tires on MH is recommended.

Before I get lectured about intentionally operating over weight - I did not go into this to find a way to run overloaded. I have enough experience with trucks and trailers of all kinds to understand the importance of staying within specs. This is why I actually go through the trouble of weighing the rig on a regular basis and continuing to work with the loading plan. This is also why I am comfortable operating at or near the max specs - I know the MH & Trailer are well set up & maintained and the trailer is top of the line with properly set up brakes on both axles. Upgrading the tires is just another step in keeping the entire rig in the best possible condition/set up. I also know and easy answer would be to just get a big Diesel Pusher - just not in the cards...yet.

Please feel free to double check my math and logic and let me know if it is flawed.

Suggest you read the tire sidewall. It gives the max "Single" (Front) load at 80 psi and the max "dual" (rear" load at 80 psi.
No need to guess.


Hopefully you have confirmed the end to end load split on each axle is exactly 50/50 and you have atleast 10% margin of tire capacity over the actual measured load on heavier end of each axle if they are not perfect at 50/50.
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Old 09-19-2019, 04:42 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RVJeeper18 View Post
Thanks for the response, just a couple follow up questions.

When you say "All Steel" "Commercial" tires - can you give me a Brand/Model example? Any chance the Continentals I picked meet your def of Commercial?

On the 80 psi rating for wheels - reason I asked was some of the more "commercial" tires I looked at were 90 psi (or greater). Also looks like Michelin discontinued the Defender LTX M/S and its replacement Agilis CrossClimate is also a 90 psi tire. Sounds like if everyone in Ford E350/E450 chassis rigs want to stay with Michelin and go with the CrossClimate they will have to upgrade wheels too?

Had never thought about load diff side to side on same axle - How do I weigh the load on each individual side? All the scales I have seen (usually Cat Scales @ Loves Truck Stops) are just by axle?

Learned my lesson on no TPMS, will go on before next trip. Plan to go with the external screw on sensors. If I use the Bolt On Valve Stems (like the TR416 from your blog) can I go with the bigger/heavier flow thru style, or should I just stay with the lighter standard sensors? Also do you have a specific recommendation on TPMS Brand/Model?

Thanks again for all the help!

In this case I mean Steel sidewall body + Steel belts.
Simply search on the tires you are considering and ask the dealer about the tire construction.
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