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Old 07-20-2014, 11:02 AM   #85
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Originally Posted by Murf2u View Post
Actually they don't 'catch air'. The science of it is that 2 points, the hood and the cab over divide the amount of undisturbed air the m/h encounters. That causes more air to spill off to the sides than a unit with no cab over would. This REDUCES the overall amount of wind resistance when compared to a similar unit with the same frontal area but no cab over.

If you understood you'd know that the flat back end causes nearly as much problem as the front does. Google "air tabs".
It catches air more than the B+ that was my point. I suggest driving one. We also have curved side walls, like the Concord, not FLAT, also making then more aerodynamic. My husband is here, his father and step-father owned trucking co's. He has driven A's, C's, Sprinter C, B+ and B, trailers, tractor trailers, conventional and cab-overs which they don't even make anymore bc of the above. Says your post is ridiculous. Not to mention the heavy equipment machinery he has driven at his job.
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Old 07-20-2014, 11:11 AM   #86
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The RVIA (Recreational Vehicle Industry Association) provides these examples (green drawings) followed by real life examples. The real life examples differ a bit from the 1980s style drawings used by RVIA. The example photos are from types of RVs found more commonly today. The BODY style does NOT determine the class, the chassis type does.

Class A


Example:
Astoria


Class B:


Example: The van conversions are often made by modifying a complete van provided by a van maker.


Class C


Example


Some people, of course, won't accept the word of an industry association whose purpose is to promote the RV industry by providing educational material. Indeed, in the same way that many people use the word seen instead of saw, or ran instead of run, language is often being mangled and misused.

Here is an example from a dealer of a Class C with the cab over bed similar to this one above, which is described by this dealer as a B+.

Navion Class B+ Motorhomes - Model 23J

The Navion is built on this chassis:



And that means that the Navion is a Class C as specified by INDUSTRY terms, an RV built on a Chassis Cab.

Class A Chassis:


Class B Chassis: A Class B is a Van Conversion.



There are some sources, such as the advertisement referenced above, that misidentify Class C motorhomes as Class B+ (Indeed one local RV dealer does) and there are other sources that call Class B Van conversions Class C motorhomes.

These illustrations are intended to show the correct original definitions. It is my opinion that the "class b+" term is invalid, partly because it is inaccurately applied but mostly because the CHASSIS type, not the body type, determines RV classes.

By the way, some Class B vans, have cab over beds but they seem to be rare in this time.



In a real life useful analysis, the only really substantive difference between a Class C with cab over bed and without, is how many people it will sleep. Using the often misused B+ label gives the wrong impression as to how a motorhome may be constructed.

This discussion is too much splitting hairs over something of no real import. Just my opinion, feel free to disagree.
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Old 07-20-2014, 11:24 AM   #87
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Originally Posted by Old Radios View Post
Weight affects mileage more than aerodynamics. That concord is 31' and has three slides so there is not much cargo capacity left. Having that aerodynamic slope on a heavy B+ makes little difference over a C with a sloped cab over. I've driven both. Being a lower B+ there is little external storage and not having a cab over to store things in makes matters worse.

We looked at a concord and it was too cramped when the slides were in so not as good for overnights when traveling where you can't put the slides out. We also did not like any of the 31' rigs we tried as there is too much overhang. Too each his own but for us no matter how much you love the the lower clearance it does not come close for us to make up for less storage, little remaining cargo capacity, and that rear overhang. A lower clearance does not help maneuverability or make it fit in a pull through parking space.
Never said lower makes it have better parking when speaking of the Concord 31 ft. I spoke of that one bc the initial post wanted a similar size. I have a 25 ft. That's the size we like bc we also like the lower height, rounded size walls also which I forget to mention and the Concord B+ also has, and makes it ride better and shorter length. We were looking at the 25 ft Concord. I said IF I were going larger, the 31 ft would be the one we would get bc the B+ drive well.
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Old 07-20-2014, 11:39 AM   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elektron View Post
The RVIA (Recreational Vehicle Industry Association) provides these examples (green drawings) followed by real life examples. The real life examples differ a bit from the 1980s style drawings used by RVIA. The example photos are from types of RVs found more commonly today. The BODY style does NOT determine the class, the chassis type does.

Class A


Example:
Astoria


Class B:


Example: The van conversions are often made by modifying a complete van provided by a van maker.


Class C


Example


Some people, of course, won't accept the word of an industry association whose purpose is to promote the RV industry by providing educational material. Indeed, in the same way that many people use the word seen instead of saw, or ran instead of run, language is often being mangled and misused.

Here is an example from a dealer of a Class C with the cab over bed similar to this one above, which is described by this dealer as a B+.

Navion Class B+ Motorhomes - Model 23J

The Navion is built on this chassis:



And that means that the Navion is a Class C as specified by INDUSTRY terms, an RV built on a Chassis Cab.

Class A Chassis:


Class B Chassis: A Class B is a Van Conversion.



There are some sources, such as the advertisement referenced above, that misidentify Class C motorhomes as Class B+ (Indeed one local RV dealer does) and there are other sources that call Class B Van conversions Class C motorhomes.

These illustrations are intended to show the correct original definitions. It is my opinion that the "class b+" term is invalid, partly because it is inaccurately applied but mostly because the CHASSIS type, not the body type, determines RV classes.

By the way, some Class B vans, have cab over beds but they seem to be rare in this time.



In a real life useful analysis, the only really substantive difference between a Class C with cab over bed and without, is how many people it will sleep. Using the often misused B+ label gives the wrong impression as to how a motorhome may be constructed.

This discussion is too much splitting hairs over something of no real import. Just my opinion, feel free to disagree.
You show no B+ on here so this means nothing. The industry doesn't manufacturer them like they did, that is WHY. Mine says B Plus right on it. Do you have an answer for the fact that mine states B+ right on it? Where is a pic above of the BT Cruisers, the Trail-Lite B Plus that I own, because they are no longer made. The Coachmen Concord, Phoenix Cruiser, Coach House, Viper are a few that are still being manufactured. The Sprinter Navions etc., without the cab over bunks, are similar and designed after these and are called B+ at times to differentiate between the C with the cab over bed, and the B+ ones that don't have that. Stop beating a dead horse, mine says B Plus right on it. You have no pic of a B+ here. There is a real difference. We want to know the difference bc we are the market for the B+ and are looking now to upgrade to another one. I don't want a C.
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Old 07-20-2014, 11:57 AM   #89
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Ok this will clear it up once and FOR ALL. The difference between a B+ and a C by a Currrent manufacturer. Nexus. They have both B+ and C. Click on the link of the B+, then look at their C models.


The Viper | Class B+ Motorhome | NeXus RV
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Old 07-20-2014, 12:03 PM   #90
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Maybe NOW you will understand the difference. Shows pics too to help you. And from the INDUSTRY themselves. Please view link.
Advantages of a Class B+ motorhome:
  • Easy to maneuver and handle
  • Reasonably good gas mileage (12-16 miles to a gallon)
  • Optional use as an extra family vehicle
  • Easy to set up wherever you travel
  • Great towing ability
  • Fits in most home garages

What is a Class B+ Motorhome
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Old 07-20-2014, 06:15 PM   #91
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As I mentioned earlier, apples versus pineapples.

Comparing a 5 cyl. 2.7 litre diesel to a V10 6.8 lire gas engine is nearly as silly as the rest of the argument.

The horse is dead, you can stop beating on it, it won't move any more.
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Old 07-20-2014, 11:41 PM   #92
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I have been considering buying a Class A most recently and have seen some nice ones. But now I'm wondering why not look at Class C's also. I like the idea of sitting up high in a Class A and enjoying the spectacular views when driving, but am wondering why others go with Class C's instead. The insides seem rather equal in floor plans and quality, so why are you a Class C person rather than a Class A one?

Now I understand the reason when you talk about short ones, but I am referring to the longer ones say 30' or so. What are the advantages of a larger Class C over a class A. It seems like the used Class Cs can actually be more expensive than the 10 yr old A's.

So why, how, when, etc of C's over A's. Does ease of use enter into it at all, especially for older less physical people are concerned? What is your take on it all?

Thanks, any and all input would be helpful to me now. Let's take 2 examples of what I like and what has raised these questions:
1. 29' Class C
2. 30' Class A
Back to your original question.

IMO you are approaching MH ownership with the proper attitude. Do a lot of research before making a commitment.

Fortunately there are advantages for both A and C models. I know folks with both and as you can see from the posts in this thread there are favorites.

I do not believe that either have an advantage over the other when you consider how you are going to use the particular model. Some have more living space, some have more storage space. You are comparing similar length units so there will be some differences in space allotments.

The big question is how do you see yourself using it? You have to decide which floor plan will suit your needs the best. Any MH, 5er, TT will require some physical input to drive and maintain them. Cost will be different depending upon what you can maintain and what you have to pay to maintain.

A class C of similar length may be slightly more maneuverable than the class A but both will be able to get into the same location. The c will turn shorter but will have more tail swing which IMO makes them about equal for parking. I think the A will ride a bit better than the C but you will have to test drive both and make your own decision.

What it comes down to is the floor plan and how you think you will be using it. Either will fit your needs but you will be the one who has to live in it.

Good luck with your quest and many happy camping miles.
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Old 07-21-2014, 06:28 AM   #93
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Once you cut the sides of the van to make a wider box it is no longer a B. B+ is the wrong terminology. It's just an industry term used by salesmen to try to convince you it will get better gas mileage. Once you load it up you won't. I agree that a rig with a cut-away chassis with no cab over should be called a C- but the industry won't because a "-" is not a good selling term. I also agree that this horse is dead and continuing to beat it in hopes of changing either sides opinion on what the proper terminology for the design should be called is pointless.
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Old 07-21-2014, 09:24 AM   #94
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As I mentioned earlier, apples versus pineapples.

Comparing a 5 cyl. 2.7 litre diesel to a V10 6.8 lire gas engine is nearly as silly as the rest of the argument.

The horse is dead, you can stop beating on it, it won't move any more.
The ones I am referring to are not sprinter diesels. We have a Ford V10 6.8 ltr on a 350 chassis, 411 rear diff. The only time I mentioned diesel was bc the new sprinter diesels are out now and I mentioned that the industry is Changing. Which is why many do not know what a B+ is, and why I originally posted and still am. How many mpg does your C get? The original B+ as the link shows, were getting 12-16 mpg with the same gas engines that were in the Cs. Which is what we get in ours. I am not comparing mine to a diesel.
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Old 07-21-2014, 09:37 AM   #95
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Once you cut the sides of the van to make a wider box it is no longer a B. B+ is the wrong terminology. It's just an industry term used by salesmen to try to convince you it will get better gas mileage. Once you load it up you won't. I agree that a rig with a cut-away chassis with no cab over should be called a C- but the industry won't because a "-" is not a good selling term. I also agree that this horse is dead and continuing to beat it in hopes of changing either sides opinion on what the proper terminology for the design should be called is pointless.
\

As mentioned in the link I am reposting here, look at it, the B+ were known for getting 12-16 mpg, which I know first hand, not from a salesmen as you try to say, bc we GET that mpg, with the SAME gas engines that were in the Cs. Now go chug along with your 9-10 mpg. And how do you account for mine saying B+ right on it? Answer that. I send you a link from Nexus themselves, one of the few who still manufacturer BOTH a C and B+, showing the difference and selling them as two different models. You don't want to be educated in this, that's too bad, but don't try to change the facts. It's not the end of the world to be wrong. If you look at the Nexus link, the C is 11'3 high, the B+ is 10'4 with air conditioner. There were other differences also. Mine has curved side walls making it more aerodynamic besides being lower, mine is just under 10' high, etc.
http://www.classbmotorhomesguide.com/what-is-class-b/

http://www.nexusrv.com/viper.php
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Old 07-21-2014, 10:42 AM   #96
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Should have just did this from the beginning, would have saved a lot energy. To end this once and for all I am posting an actual pic of MINE. This is my actual RV in my driveway. Says B Plus right on it. Which is why I felt so strongly about posting.
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Old 07-21-2014, 10:45 AM   #97
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Another pic of MY actual motorhome. The pic came out large it is on a Ford chassis.
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Old 07-21-2014, 10:48 AM   #98
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My B+ in my driveway. Obviously NOT a made up term. I have nothing more to say.
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