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Old 05-31-2014, 08:50 AM   #15
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My tires say max psi 80 is that what I should inflate them to?
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Old 05-31-2014, 02:35 PM   #16
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Can I weight my motorhome at a rest stop
Generally roadside rest stops don't have scales. Go to a truck stop like Pilot/Flying J... Loves, etc.

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My tires say max psi 80 is that what I should inflate them to?
Probably not a bad idea until you can get your rig weighed and determine the proper PSI.

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Old 05-31-2014, 05:35 PM   #17
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Generally, commercial tire centers inflate the tires to their stated max pressure. This will not hurt the tires, but may create a rough ride. Tire centers often overinflate to check for a good seal. Check the pressure on the other new tires. Maybe, it was a road hazard maybe just a BSD tire.

Glad to hear no one was hurt.
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Old 05-31-2014, 05:58 PM   #18
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When I picked up my coach from the dealer, the front tires were where they needed to be. The REAR tires were all at 67 pounds. They were supposed to be at 80 pounds per the sticker.

Shows how much the 'dealership knows about proper tire inflation'. I check my tires before every trip, and if I'm staying longer then a hour from home I bring my gauges, chucks, and PortaCable inflator along for the ride.
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Old 06-04-2014, 05:09 PM   #19
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It's been my experience that regardless of where I bought the tires, or what they where for, the guys doing the installation just put some random number of p.s.i. in them.
One of the first things I do when I get home from buying tires is to check, and most usually inflate the tire to the proper pressure. I always run at the max pressure stated on the tire. That way I know without a doubt the tire has enough pressure in it. They may ride a little rougher, but I have never really been able to tell much of a difference.
My suggestion to anyone buying new tires is to check the inflation pressure yourself. Then there is only on person to blame.
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Old 06-04-2014, 09:59 PM   #20
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Underinflated tire will get too hot and can cause failure. But it could also just be a defect that was not found during mfg. I also think it could be a road damage, it does not have to be right at the time of the blowout - it can happen many miles down the road.

Good thing is you had nothing worse happen. Get the tire replaced and go on with your trip. Have fun on the remainder!
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Old 06-05-2014, 10:40 AM   #21
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A note on tires. Not all tires are created equally. When a new tire has a catastrophic failure it generally suggest one of two things. The most common is that the tire was installed improperly or that the tire isnít the proper tire for the application and the second is that there was a defect. The least common is that your tires were too old they do have a shelf life of 6 years.
First thing to check is the tire date code the DOT (Department Of Transportation) requires that each tire will have a date stamped on it. You will see the DOT code with two ovals the last oval will end in 3 or 4 digits. The first two digits are the week the tire was made and the second two digits are the year it was made. So a tire with the date code 1213 would mean that the tire was made during the twelfth week of 2013 if there are only 3 digits 123 that means that the tire was made on the twelfth week of 2003. The first will always be 2 digits from 01 to 52.
The next thing to check is the load range. If youíre in a class C you should have at least a load range E tire. Some Iíve seen have load range G but are rare. If you look inside the door or in your ownerís manual you will find the tire requirements and recommended sizes and the expected pressures. For instance my coach requires 80 PSI in the 4 rear tires and 75 PSI in the front. This is on a sticker on the inside of the driverís door. If the tires you installed on your coach werenít the proper load range then a blowout was inevitable.
Another thing to look for and this goes for cars as well as RVís is to look at the amount of weight on the tire. If you see excessive weight that usually means that the tire has been installed with the high spot of the tire on the high spot of the wheel. Yup your wheels arenít perfectly round and neither are the tires. When you match those up it requires that you add extra weight to prevent you from feeling the wheels shake. When you see this have the installer match mount the tire by deflating it and turning the tire 180 degrees. If it still requires excessive weight you may have a defective tire or a bent rim. Some of the new balance machines will tell the technician to change the direction of the tire.
I didnít see how your tire blew out or where the hole was. It could have been a road hazard where the tire impacted something that tore it apart but in most cases this kind of failure wonít cause the tire to suddenly deflate with a ďBlowoutĒ it will slowly deflate. Depending on where the tire failed it will tell a great deal about what the cause was. Kudos to the driver for not overcompensating and causing an accident.
A manufactures defect may have been to blame. This can be any of a thousand things that in most cases are caught at the factory but one slips by every now and then. I hope you can use this information to shed some light on what may have caused your problem and hope that you donít find this again.
Just a note if the dealership installed the improper load range tire they are liable for any and all damages.
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Old 06-05-2014, 03:16 PM   #22
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Here's a pic of tireClick image for larger version

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Old 06-06-2014, 06:34 AM   #23
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From that picture it looks like a manufacturers defect. It is the proper load range and I did the best I could but it looked like the date code was 2611 which would put it around July of 2011. What's most disturbing about that picture is that the bead was broken on the upper side. That's really hard to do. I would contact Uniroyal and show them your picture. Check the rest of your tires to see if they have the same date code. Look for bulges on the sidewalls near the base of the tread or dimples. If you see any DO NOT drive that coach any further than a Uniroyal dealer.

I could be wrong about the date code that was as far as I could zoom in. If you would check the last 4 digits in the DOT code and send those back that will tell the tale. If it's 2611 you bought tires that had been on the shelf that are 3 years old.
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Old 06-06-2014, 06:51 AM   #24
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No, the dot code is 1614, and I will contact Uniroyal
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Old 06-06-2014, 07:11 AM   #25
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Agreed, it takes an unbelievable amount of force to go through the bead, it's incredibly strong!

Hold on to that tire at all costs, do not even give it back to Uniroyal until you get a commitment to do right by you in WRITING.

This could have gone horribly wrong!
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Old 06-06-2014, 08:32 AM   #26
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We got the tires at a rv dealer, don't you think they should know , I mean I don't know

Considering some of the stories I have heard on these forums and considering one or two of my own.. NO, i do not think they would necessarly be any different than Belle Tire (Who by the way put in the pressure I TOLD them to put in).

Some stories:
They screwed up the install of the brake system on my towed
Put in six volt batteries, All in parallel (Another member).
Tell people an F-150 can tow a F-350 load (Many members).
Failed to put the drain tube out through the vent on a Dometic Fridge.. TWICE (mine) and many times (other members).

Just to name a few.. Except for the issues marked MINE, all different dealers, And in all cases not one of them is Camping World. (I have more where CW is concerned but I left them out for this post).
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Old 06-06-2014, 10:37 PM   #27
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When I picked up my coach from the dealer, the front tires were where they needed to be. The REAR tires were all at 67 pounds. They were supposed to be at 80 pounds per the sticker.

Shows how much the 'dealership knows about proper tire inflation'. I check my tires before every trip, and if I'm staying longer then a hour from home I bring my gauges, chucks, and PortaCable inflator along for the ride.
Those tires at 67psi on the rear were good for about 9,700-9,800#,which is more than your rear axle rating, and probably a few psi more than what you actually needed. 80# on the rear is good for 11,112#, a lot more than what's needed.
Your front tires should probably be somewhere around 65# which is good for 4,670#.
It sounds to me like the dealer adjusted the rear tire psi to the GVWR of the rear axle and then some. I don't know what your front tires had for pressure.

Michelin Americas Truck Tire Load & Inflation Tables
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Old 06-07-2014, 06:08 AM   #28
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Strange failure, if this was the failure and not a result of the failure. As others stated, the steel ring is extremely robust. Also, the straight line tear would have to cross all sidewall belts. The belts don't run in the direction of the tear.

As for tire pressures, there is nothing wrong with running them at their stated maximum pressure. So, as long as they had at least the minimum required you shouldn't expect a pressure related failure.
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