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Old 01-27-2008, 03:30 PM   #1
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I have a 1999 Itasca 27'....Somewhere I read that I should put tires on that are " E " rated. Well, I did LT 225/75R16. I just went to B F Goodrich site and it says they are great mud & snow tires ? Does anyone know if I have the right tires on or should I be using something else.
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Bob
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Old 01-27-2008, 03:30 PM   #2
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I have a 1999 Itasca 27'....Somewhere I read that I should put tires on that are " E " rated. Well, I did LT 225/75R16. I just went to B F Goodrich site and it says they are great mud & snow tires ? Does anyone know if I have the right tires on or should I be using something else.
Thanks
Bob
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Old 01-27-2008, 04:23 PM   #3
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Personally, I would look for a RIB type highway radial for an RV. Michelin and Bridgestone both make an excellent tire, but they are kind of $$$$$$.

Ken
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Old 01-29-2008, 06:07 AM   #4
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The "E" indicates the load carrying capacity of the tire, but the sidewall should also state the maximum it can carry in lbs. You determine the right tire by either max axle capacity (GAWR rating for the axle) or by actually weighing the rig, front and rear axles separately. You want tires that can carry the max load (just in case), but you can adjust the air pressure down from the max shown on the sidewall if you customarily are loaded substantially less than the max.

An "E" rating is an approximate load range - one manufacturer's "E" may carry more or less than another's, but they will be fairly close.
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Old 02-18-2008, 09:06 PM   #5
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Thanks for the info. I guess my next step is to get on the scales and see where I'm at.
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Old 02-19-2008, 06:08 AM   #6
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If you know your front and rear axle capacity (called GAWR) you could buy tires with a load rating at least equal to that capacity. For example, if the front axle has a 7000 lb GAWR, divide that by 2 (two tires per axle) and round up about 400 lbs to allow for an unequal weight distribution. Same for the rears, though you might divide by 4 (4 tires per axle instead of w). Most people want all the tires alike so they can be swapped around, so choose the tire load range that equals or exceeds the largest needed in any one position.

In any recent year rig the GAWR will be shown on a rating plate on the interior wall near the driver seat
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