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Old 08-07-2016, 04:59 PM   #1
cwk
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What do full-timers do after the "vacation"???

So, after both retire, and travel around on "vacation" seeing places they haven't seen before, then what?

Actually, let me start even earlier than that. Most of our travels during our life together have been by air or car. We have seen a variety of places and like to travel. Retirement is coming up in several more years and we are slowly looking for a Class A DP. We currently have a TT, but really do not much with it. Our tow vehicle doesn't handle it well, and the TT is just too old for cross-country traveling. Currently it is not even ready to travel.

My thinking that is we would find a used DP about a year or two before full retirement. Then, start taking some short trips, then some longer ones as schedule permits. This should tell us whether or not we really want to leave S&B and go full-time.

But, what do full-timers really do? I know. It depends on what we want to do. Of course. But, we don't really know what and where we can go with a Class A.

For example, this past Saturday we were riding around a small coastal town in Florida (Cape Canaveral). We stopped at a recommended local diner for a good lunch. Then, we drove around a bit just to look. I observed that most of the side streets we were on simply would not accommodate a Class A. I guess that means a toad. We have been used to just taking a detour here and there with the car and just looking. Can't do that with a 40+ coach!

So, the interstates and highways should be ok. But, stopping in little towns? Where do you park a big rig for an hour or two to visit something local?

Stopping to find a place to park the coach, unhook the toad, then drive around, does not seem to be very "spontaneous" as we have been in the past. You just cannot say "Gee, I wonder what is down that little road?" and make the turn with a big rig.

Some of the places to visit probably would have larger parking lots. Say, some of the historical towns (Williamsburg comes to mind: park and take their site-seeing trolley.) Is this true? I know we have seen tour buses at some of these places, but have not really looked for RV's. What's the story?

OK. So, suppose we spend a year or so full-time "vacationing" and site-seeing. Then what? I know. Follow the weather. We grew up with ice and shoveling snow. We are not interested in that any more. And, it's not good for a coach either. But, what does one do?

Neither of us are real "nature lovers" by any stretch. We don't hunt. We don't fish. We don't "hike" trails. We don't 4-wheel. We don't play golf. We do love visiting natural sites and really enjoy the views. But, things like tent-camping are not even on any to-do list in our plans. We did it once when our son was in scouts. 80+ degrees in a campground in Florida. Wife and I may have had 15 minutes of sleep in the tent. True: bad timing, but we didn't set the scout schedule. I don't want to sleep on the ground again!

OK. I have been rambling around trying to give some background. I have been searching this forum, and others, for ideas. I am just not sure how to approach this quite yet. As I said, we still have a few years before we get going. We are visiting dealers to look at used DP's. That is helping. But, I still am not sure of a lot of things. We are wondering how others handled this thought process.

Looking forward to learning from those who have traveled before us...
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Old 08-07-2016, 05:06 PM   #2
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Full-timing is living in a house you can move around, it is not an extended vacation.

You have the advantage of being able to move your house for climate reasons, family visits, and numerous other reasons.

Having a toad makes life a whole lot easier. Just make it part of the package.
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Old 08-07-2016, 05:38 PM   #3
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Hello Charles & Beverly. I suggest that you take a look through some rv blogs. There are a ton of them out there. You can see what other people are doing with a quick Google search. One thing a lot of RVer's do is ride bicycles. We do that and use them to explore the towns we park near. Great exercise and you see everything. We have a basket for picnic materials and a lock if we want to park them and go in somewhere. Here's our blog, Pullin' Chocks good luck and safe travels to you two.
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Old 08-07-2016, 05:45 PM   #4
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I can only speak for myself. Full timing is not an extended vacation, it's a life style. We don't just stop in places like Williamsburg for an afternoon. We find a nearby RV park or State Park, stay for a few days or more, and tour Williamsburg.
When your are retired and full time there is no rush, there are no deadlines except those you make yourself. If you like a place, stay longer. If the next place you want to see is only 80 miles away, pack up and move the coach 80 miles. Your not trying to put miles behind you, your trying to make memories.
Full time is not something you do; it is something you live.
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Old 08-07-2016, 05:47 PM   #5
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My thinking that is we would find a used DP about a year or two before full retirement. Then, start taking some short trips, then some longer ones as schedule permits. This should tell us whether or not we really want to leave S&B and go full-time.
I'd suggest you don't go the DP route but look into a 5th wheel and truck.

First it has a lower cost of entry, lower maintenance, and if you don't like RVing, you won't loose a lot of money.

However, it really doesn't sound if full time RVing is for you. You might be more of 6 months RVing and 6 months at home. This really isn't much different then what other full timers do. Some have 2 or 3 places where they move to at different times of the year.
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Old 08-07-2016, 05:53 PM   #6
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Let me give you a different slant to look at. What do you do at home? Is it portable? We will never full time for a variety of reasons including our major recreations take up space that we would not have in the MH. If you have activities like that you are better off thinking part time, not full time, travel.

The other part of your question comes down to how you travel. Some folks seem to worry about how many miles they can accumulate. Others do a much more relaxed stay for a week or month at a time and get to know an area a bit. Some float between a few areas on the same circle following the weather. Whatever floats your personal boat.
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Old 08-07-2016, 06:19 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Selah View Post
I can only speak for myself. Full timing is not an extended vacation, it's a life style. We don't just stop in places like Williamsburg for an afternoon. We find a nearby RV park or State Park, stay for a few days or more, and tour Williamsburg.
When your are retired and full time there is no rush, there are no deadlines except those you make yourself. If you like a place, stay longer. If the next place you want to see is only 80 miles away, pack up and move the coach 80 miles. Your not trying to put miles behind you, your trying to make memories.
Full time is not something you do; it is something you live.
X2 for us

Our normal drive day is 120 miles then 2-4 days to see the sights. We actually accumulated 1,000 more miles on the toad than the motorhome last year not counting towing miles; approx. 10,500 on RV & 11,600 on toad. We are in no hurry to get all the miles we can in a day. If we find an area we really like our 3 day stay turns into a 3 week stay. Our shortest trip was 9 miles

We like to explore the often missed surprises when you really take the time to explore. Like OP we are not hikers, bikers, boaters, etc. but we do find the small towns, museums, unusual places everywhere we stop. Only thing we will change in the future is a toad that is a bit higher clearance for those dirt/gravel roads we sometimes find ourselves on....although our mini van has done a few hundred miles on those roads

We have decided to winter in Yuma but have a couple of trips planned during our months there just to keep from getting cabin fever
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Old 08-07-2016, 06:29 PM   #8
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So, after both retire, and travel around on "vacation" seeing places they haven't seen before, then what?

Actually, let me start even earlier than that. Most of our travels during our life together have been by air or car. We have seen a variety of places and like to travel. Retirement is coming up in several more years and we are slowly looking for a Class A DP. We currently have a TT, but really do not much with it. Our tow vehicle doesn't handle it well, and the TT is just too old for cross-country traveling. Currently it is not even ready to travel.

My thinking that is we would find a used DP about a year or two before full retirement. Then, start taking some short trips, then some longer ones as schedule permits. This should tell us whether or not we really want to leave S&B and go full-time.

But, what do full-timers really do? I know. It depends on what we want to do. Of course. But, we don't really know what and where we can go with a Class A.

For example, this past Saturday we were riding around a small coastal town in Florida (Cape Canaveral). We stopped at a recommended local diner for a good lunch. Then, we drove around a bit just to look. I observed that most of the side streets we were on simply would not accommodate a Class A. I guess that means a toad. We have been used to just taking a detour here and there with the car and just looking. Can't do that with a 40+ coach!

So, the interstates and highways should be ok. But, stopping in little towns? Where do you park a big rig for an hour or two to visit something local?

Stopping to find a place to park the coach, unhook the toad, then drive around, does not seem to be very "spontaneous" as we have been in the past. You just cannot say "Gee, I wonder what is down that little road?" and make the turn with a big rig.

Some of the places to visit probably would have larger parking lots. Say, some of the historical towns (Williamsburg comes to mind: park and take their site-seeing trolley.) Is this true? I know we have seen tour buses at some of these places, but have not really looked for RV's. What's the story?

OK. So, suppose we spend a year or so full-time "vacationing" and site-seeing. Then what? I know. Follow the weather. We grew up with ice and shoveling snow. We are not interested in that any more. And, it's not good for a coach either. But, what does one do?

Neither of us are real "nature lovers" by any stretch. We don't hunt. We don't fish. We don't "hike" trails. We don't 4-wheel. We don't play golf. We do love visiting natural sites and really enjoy the views. But, things like tent-camping are not even on any to-do list in our plans. We did it once when our son was in scouts. 80+ degrees in a campground in Florida. Wife and I may have had 15 minutes of sleep in the tent. True: bad timing, but we didn't set the scout schedule. I don't want to sleep on the ground again!

OK. I have been rambling around trying to give some background. I have been searching this forum, and others, for ideas. I am just not sure how to approach this quite yet. As I said, we still have a few years before we get going. We are visiting dealers to look at used DP's. That is helping. But, I still am not sure of a lot of things. We are wondering how others handled this thought process.

Looking forward to learning from those who have traveled before us...

We are in our tenth year of full time living. Your premise is flawed. Full timing describes a lifestyle not a vacation type. Our daily life is like it would be in a house/condo/apartment but the geographic location can change. True, sometimes we can be in a "vacation mode". If you go on vacation now, you pick a destination & reserve a hotel room & plan activities or sight seeing. No difference except substitute campground or RV resort for hotel. It's also very simple to extend the "vacation" long enough to get more of a sense of being local.

When we first retired and got past the sale of the S&B, we did have a couple of years when we were in vacation mode more than not. We checked off some "bucket list" things like Alaska, New England, west coast, etc. Since those first years, we have settled into a seasonal/regional travel schedule.

We spend one or two months in the Keys in the fall. We return to the Gatlinburg TN area for the holiday season. We go to the east or west coast of south Florida for 3-5 cold months. We generally do some traveling in the summer months.

Towing a vehicle is necessary so just figure on doing it. You won't do your spontaneous stops or exploring in the coach but there is a saying of; "drive 200 miles & stay 2 weeks". We have stayed in a wide range of campgrounds & RV parks. We don't usually view the campground as the draw for the area. It's just a place to park & explore.

When we are in travel mode, we rarely stay in a campground for one night if we are headed for a specific destination. My favorite overnight stop is Walmart/truck stop or other just off the highway location. My favorite length of stay at a destination is 2 weeks to 3 months. Ten years ago my max planned daily travel distance was 500-600 miles. That has decreased to 350-450 miles.

Good luck with your planning. It's a wonderful lifestyle.

Safe travels.
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Old 08-07-2016, 09:28 PM   #9
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I totally agree with the above posts. We full-timed for 16 years and never thought of it as a vacation. It's a new lifestyle.

You mentioned parking for an hour or two and checking out a small town. What others stated is correct, you first find a place to stay - RV park, state park, etc. and then plan to stay at least a couple days to explore this new area. You can always re-up on the RV park if you feel you'd like more time. The main thing is that you don't do the one hour tour of a town or museum as you may have done on a car vacation. You stay and see what else you can find or just take a few days off and relax at the RV. You don't tour in your motorhome. You really need to tow a car if you want to see this amazing country in all the nooks and crannies.


Stay off the interstates and you'll enjoy it more. The secondary highways are great to explore and the small-town folk are friendly. There's no problem with finding fuel out there and eating at local restaurants is better than the chains along the interstates. In the western states many mountain roads are very doable with a large RV. You just have to do your research. There's a publication to purchase 'Mountain Directory for RVers and Truckers'. It comes in east and west editions. It's very helpful.

What you do as you travel? What do you do at home? If you read, watch television, do computer stuff, take walks, shop, etc., then that's what you'll do at your RV. You're not retired yet so you really don't have an idea now on how you would fill your time in your present home. It won't be any different in a RV.

It doesn't sound like you are active people - hiking, fishing, golfing, etc. but perhaps when you are retired and have more time things like that might appeal to you. Give them a try. Have you ever played tennis? Pickleball is similar but less strenuous for seniors. It's very popular nowadays and you'll probably see it played as you stay in RV parks. Players are always eager to show others so jump in and learn a new skill. We absolutely love it. It's a good way to socialize with others, have fun and get some exercise.

Many full-timers volunteer in national or state parks. This not only helps the parks but also gives you purpose and a way to use some of your time. You'll also get a free campsite. Pick a place you'd really like to be for about two months and contact the parks to see if there are openings - perhaps around a major national park. You will have plenty of free time to explore the surrounding areas. The parks really appreciate volunteers. If you have a particular skill or interest, zero in on that. We love giving lighthouse tours. Some folks enjoy the visitor centers and some like outdoor light maintenance chores. There are a lot of options out there. Volunteering gives you a nice break from travel.

Your idea of getting a motorhome before retirement is good. Take trips with it and see how you spend your time. Then you can get a feel if full-timing would be for you. It's not for everyone and you both have to want to do it equally from the very start. Don't try to talk the other into 'trying' it. It won't work.
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Old 08-07-2016, 10:26 PM   #10
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6 years full timing we average 8-9 months a year volunteering mostly at USFWS refuges though we have volunteered at other Federal and state facilities. We enjoy giving back and learning about new places and it is always interesting. We do find ourselves camping in some unique places that the public never have access to. Our vacations are the travel between volunteer positions we try to stay off the interstates an explore the roads less traveled. We take many day trips while at these volunteer locations. The DW has taken up birding as a hobby which servers her well as most refuges have their own resident birds or are seasonal home for others. All in all a great way to spend retirement.
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Old 08-08-2016, 12:27 AM   #11
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You're outhinking yourselves. Just go out for a month. If you return home, go out for two months. All ok? Then make it three months or more. The two of you will have to be in full agreement; "we'll see" will never work.

We went out for a two-month trip back in 2010 and apparently forgot to go home.

What we do is go to an area/place that we like and stay anywhere from a few months to a couple of years. We're about to pull out from our current CG since 11/14. It's not that we don't like it; it's that our wheels are itchy.

I'll betcha I could've parked at that joint in Canaveral. I stuffed the Queen's Barge's butt between two box trucks and a fence in Abbeville Louisiana because I wanted to eat there. But seriously, a toad will come in mighty helpful. We've never had a toad until this year; Enterprise has picked us up. But Enterprise isn't picking us up in BFE Texas so we've acquried a toad...rather than borrowing the CG manager gal's truck every couple of weeks.

In fact, we've never had any trouble at all borrowing someone's car or truck to go to town; a full gas tank is always a given and the vehicle is always available.

Very important though. Imagine you're in BFE Texas and the thermometer tops 100F every day for a couple of weeks. You're stuck indoors as opposed to heat stroke. What are you going to do and can you do it? Day after day after day?
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Old 08-08-2016, 07:48 AM   #12
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After reading some great replies, please allow me to answer some of your questions.

We are very active now. My wife works full-time and also is involved with job-related activities on the regional and state level. I own/operate a small specialty furniture manufacturing operation. That keeps me busy 6-7 days a week with sometimes quite long hours. My clients are located throughout the state of FL, so I do get a lot of car travel and SUV-trailer travel (deliveries) time. My wife does get car and air travel in (often monthly or more often) for her work-related activities.

What we do not do is a lot of physical recreation. There just never seems to be enough time. My job keeps me physically active. But, I am looking forward to a future schedule without the pressure of time. My wife and I were discussing RV traveling last night and I mentioned the Williamsburg response by one of you. Her comment was "You mean we could spend a couple of days there instead of rushing through in a couple of hours?" That kind of sums up our occasional "vacations" from the past.

My wife does like to read. She uses her iPad and a subscription to Amazon books (?). For $10/month she is very happy. And, the books don't take up much room (no need for a bookcase/library!). I like to spend time on the computer. So, an internet connection is pretty important. Currently we are using a mobile hotspot at our S&B. We just moved to a different S&B a few months ago and I decided to learn more about mobile computing. So, I skipped installing a landline and DSL. We both use cellphones anyway. It turns out that 4G and LTE are often faster than our old DSL at the last S&B. This is more expensive at the moment (I am still researching different plans), but we can take it with us when we do travel (day trips or longer). We both used to ride bicycles, so that may be a good option in the future. We are not into "hiking" but taking walks is good.

We realize that full-timing is not an extended vacation. That is why I titled this thread 'What do full-timers do after the "vacation"???' I have read other forums posts in the past where new retirees do spend some "vacation time" when they first retire, but then start their "full-timing lifestyle." That is what I want to learn.

We discussed the idea of volunteering and that may be good for us. It could still give us a "sense of purpose" in our lives. It would be a way to "give back" and help others in some small way through our efforts. Traveling near family for certain seasons/events sounds good as well.

We also noticed that we used to be more socially active. Just getting together with friends (e.g., fellow church members, etc.) and playing Dominoes. Spending an evening together once or more a week, playing games, and talking was nice. We relocated away from that group (out of state) and both have been very busy with work. So, we miss that. We have made some friends here (iRV2.com), but they are hours away. We have been told that campgrounds can be conducive to informal activities.

I am also looking forward to spending more time with my wife. I do like it when she rides with me on sales calls (if they are on the weekend and she can). She may sleep for part of the trip , but we share in the driving and try to stop some place interesting if there is time.

I am thinking that I really do not have a clue what retirement will be like. Will we like spending lots of time together? Will we drive each other nuts? Will the RV be too small? Will my "man-cave" be one of the storage compartments underneath the rig?

We have down-sized a few times in the last decade and a half. We are now in about 1/3rd of the space. We are having yard sales, gave lots of stuff to the "kids" (son, DIL), giving some stuff away, and trashing stuff that we have kept/stored for years that has no "real value." This past Saturday (during a sales call where the client would not let my wife wait for me in our air-conditioned car), the lady talked about her down-sizing. They just retired, moved to FL from WI, and down-sized. Her goal for folks is "a box a week." We have a ways to go! I got rid of three boxes last night!

I have read about folks who keep on RV'ing forever. Some return to S&B when they feel it isn't safe anymore; tool old to drive. Some want to change their life-style. Some may have medical issues that require a different housing arrangement. How old is too old? Is 68-70 too old to even start full-timing with a Class A? Am i losing my mind?

Thanks to all who are taking the time to respond and contribute. Your replies are extremely helpful.
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Old 08-08-2016, 08:50 AM   #13
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Charles and Beverly-

I can't speak to the full-time RV lifestyle. I've been retired two years, and my wife more. We still own a house, and as long as the grandchildren are in that area, we'll continue to do so. She likes gardening, anyway, so it'll be one or both of us to the old folk's home before the house is likely to be sold.

What I can offer are these two observations: You aren't what you do, and you aren't what you have. If you both can get past those two false ideas, you can have a happy, fulfilling life together- even before retirement.

I moved very easily into retirement. My wife has not driven me out of "her space," to the basement, garage or the coach's storage bays. I wouldn't blame her if she did, though. I've observed that certain personalities adapt better by "ramping down," rather than going cold turkey (refer to paragraph above).

You mentioned you two used to be more socially connected. We understand. Our RV travels actually take us away from our primary social connection- our church family. So, when we travel we look forward to worshipping with other folks, and we try to strike up friendly conversations with our fellow RVers and the people who serve us- park staff, waiters and waitresses, mechanics, the guy at the deli counter. It's amazing how much you an find out about a place from the "locals." We treasure most of all the few folks who've gone out of their way to get to know us better when we were on the road. It makes even short stays very satisfying.

You don't have to full-time to gather and return the blessings.

In summary, I guess I'd say "It's all about people." That means both what's in you two (expectations) and the people you meet. The places you go and the things you experience are just so much compost to fertilize the relationships you have, current and future.
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Old 08-08-2016, 11:36 AM   #14
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I am thinking that I really do not have a clue what retirement will be like. Will we like spending lots of time together? Will we drive each other nuts? Will the RV be too small? Will my "man-cave" be one of the storage compartments underneath the rig?
Above is your issue.

Don't by a RV, ftop thinking about RVing at this point.

By this book. It is more then the financial book it talks about how to think about a good retirement.

https://www.amazon.com/How-Retire-Ha.../dp/096941949X
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