Go Back   iRV2 Forums > CAMPING, TRAVEL and TRIP PLANNING > Boondocking
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-01-2015, 07:32 AM   #29
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: In the shadow of the Canadian rockies
Posts: 169
Don't forget champion very quiet and lite .
__________________

__________________
doorfx is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 09-01-2015, 07:51 AM   #30
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 680
Quote:
Originally Posted by caissiel View Post
For 20 years I tried to charge batteries with TV, booster cables and generator and still had dead batteries during my stay. Even while traveling on the road for hours everyday.
Installed 200 watts of solar and one additional battery and after 3 years I never saw my batteries below 12 volts.
The solar pay back is in the life of my batteries that needed replacement every 2 years Max. Plus after 3 years my batteries never needed additional water. A first for me in 23 years.
I added the 3rd battery when the solar had the batteries charged by 11am.
I am sold on solar and for me the only way that works.

Just returned from a 1 week boondocking trip and the power was a none event. After a cloudy day I saw my battries charging at 14 amp rate for a few hrs. 200 watts works well for us with 3 batteries.

Also I never needed my powerplant since solar. Proper engineered solar should now be a standard option on RVs. They are so simple and easy to maintain. They occupy no space and weight very little. Plus on the road they save fuel as the TV alternator does not load up.

Yep, solar is the way I want to go and from your comments and a lot more that I have read I think another battery and 200 watts of solar will provide about all that we need with our little 23' TT. In a rig as small as ours I really don't want to pack around a generator plus fuel for it. I can see that as a back up or primary source with a bigger rig though. I just simply love the idea of free power from solar! :-)
__________________

__________________
parkerbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 08:06 AM   #31
Senior Member
 
BatteryPro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by bfisher003 View Post
My question: Would it be more efficient, burn less gas and re-charge the deep cycle battery faster on the trailer if I hooked up a set of jumper cables from the GC directly to the trailer battery and started the Hemi?
Yes it will. The reason your charge current reaching the battery is very low and it takes a long time to charge is the voltage drop from too small a wire size for the distance from the alternator to the battery. The alternator has an internal regulator that governs the voltage. If you could present enough load to the alternator, the current it outputs will increase as it tries to reach and maintain that voltage. By using the jumper cable, you are decreasing distance and increasing wire size so you have less voltage drop. The result is more current will be delivered to the battery and it will charge faster.

This is not a good thing to do often. We have installed quite a few automatic charging systems for applications like yours. By installing a large cable from your alternator to the rear of the vehicle, and another large cable from the tong to the battery, we have seen 40 to 60 amps going into the battery with the engine at idle. An automatic solenoid disconnects when the engine is not running. We use large anderson connectors like the one shown.

Larry
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Screen Shot 2015-09-01 at 6.56.55 AM.png
Views:	62
Size:	1.23 MB
ID:	105430  
__________________
I have a vast knowledge about PV solar, batteries and inverters. I'll try to provide the best answer if I know it and hopefully correct some "Campfire" talk. Full-time 1999-2004. Part time now. '92 Hawkins, 360AH Lithium Battery, 1480 Watts PV solar.
BatteryPro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 08:08 AM   #32
Senior Member


 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,282
Quote:
Originally Posted by bfisher003 View Post
My question: Would it be more efficient, burn less gas and re-charge the deep cycle battery faster on the trailer if I hooked up a set of jumper cables from the GC directly to the trailer battery and started the Hemi?

Car alternators will not tolerate pumping out high amps for very long before one of the diodes fails due to heat. That could leave you stranded if the alternator fails in the jeep.

If you are really short of money this would be an option ( a little on the loud side at 91 Db)

Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByiRV2 - RV Forum1441112872.629885.jpg
Views:	66
Size:	167.2 KB
ID:	105431
__________________
pasdad1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 08:25 AM   #33
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Sandy, Utah
Posts: 181
200 watts of PV charging at 14 amps?? wow! my 100 watt grape PV has only given me 4 amps so far :( But I guess that means 4.3 incl My parasitic.
Did you have yours tilted for that 14 amps?
__________________
elkski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 09:16 AM   #34
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 9,816
Quote:
Originally Posted by pasdad1 View Post
Car alternators will not tolerate pumping out high amps for very long before one of the diodes fails due to heat. That could leave you stranded if the alternator fails in the jeep.
What constitutes high amps?

If it's a 90 amp alternator, is 50 amps to much?

What about that dark, cold, rainy night, when your accessories are drawing high amps?
I would hope the alternator will handle that load for a 5 hour trip, hundreds of times.

I always read recommendations to run your RV generators at least half load, but don't strain your engine alternator.

A 12 volt alternator is a engine driven AC producing device with a bridge diode to convert the power to DC.

An RV generator is a engine driven alternator that doesn't convert AC to DC.

They are both bearing mounted, spinning rotors, surrounded by field coils, built to continuously supply 70% of their full rating for thousands of hours.
__________________
twinboat is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 09:49 AM   #35
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: In the shadow of the Canadian rockies
Posts: 169
I have a small 80w solar panel in my small tt21'. If it is sunny I can have battery power for weeks using the necessary things. However if we are in a campsite shaded by trees 50% of the day it will not keep the batteries full. I have a small 2000w champion inverter that is very quiet that I use to top up the batteries for a couple of hours then use solar. The inverter is also nice to have for high use times such as showering or when the DW wants to blow dry and curl her hair . At 48 lbs it is not much heavier than a 5 gallon jerry can full of gas.
__________________
doorfx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 10:31 AM   #36
Senior Member


 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,282
Quote:
Originally Posted by twinboat View Post
What constitutes high amps?

If it's a 90 amp alternator, is 50 amps to much?

What about that dark, cold, rainy night, when your accessories are drawing high amps?
I would hope the alternator will handle that load for a 5 hour trip, hundreds of times.

I always read recommendations to run your RV generators at least half load, but don't strain your engine alternator.

A 12 volt alternator is a engine driven AC producing device with a bridge diode to convert the power to DC.

An RV generator is a engine driven alternator that doesn't convert AC to DC.

They are both bearing mounted, spinning rotors, surrounded by field coils, built to continuously supply 70% of their full rating for thousands of hours.

https://www.optimabatteries.com/en-u...ead-batteries/

Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByiRV2 - RV Forum1441121468.616127.jpg
Views:	63
Size:	166.2 KB
ID:	105437
__________________
pasdad1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 11:21 AM   #37
Senior Member
 
CountryFit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Between the Oceans
Posts: 3,530
Blog Entries: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by twinboat View Post
An RV generator is a engine driven alternator that doesn't convert AC to DC.
twinboat, not all but a few rv gensets output dc in addition to ac. the power tech cd8000 on my rv outputs 120v ac and 14.2v dc (6 amps) concurrently.

agree the rest of what you said
__________________
2000 Country Coach Intrigue 40', ISC 350
2014 Ford C-Max Energi
CountryFit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 12:07 PM   #38
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 9,816
I would agree that charging DEAD batteries would cause MAX output on an alternator. Not something you want to do, often.

That's not the same as high output. If an alternator is designed to output 150 amps, a constant 100 amp output should not overheat it.

MH's are designed with high output alternators and systems to recharge the house batteries, after camping.

If this was the cause of chronic alternator failure, the chassis manufactures would prohibit it.

Besides, engine mounted alternators are relatively inexpensive, in the scheme of things.
__________________
twinboat is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 12:38 PM   #39
Senior Member


 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,282
Quote:
Originally Posted by twinboat View Post

MH's are designed with high output alternators and systems to recharge the house batteries, after camping.

Yes, but the OP wanted to use the alternator in his Jeep Cherokee, which is NOT designed to do this......
__________________
pasdad1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 12:55 PM   #40
Senior Member


 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,282
Quote:
Originally Posted by twinboat View Post
If an alternator is designed to output 150 amps, a constant 100 amp output should not overheat it.

In a perfect world maybe 😃

But in reality, this is not true. Alternators used in most car and truck applications have a "duty cycle" of less than 100%. Much less. The generally accepted duty cycle figure is between 50-60% of max output for continuous use without overheating. This excludes "specialty" alternators made for welding, police and tow truck use, busses, and some RV's.



http://www.k0bg.com/alternator.html

Vehicle manufacturers know the alternator will only be delivering its full output for short durations, so they cut every corner they can. It is not uncommon for a 160 amp alternator to have a continuous duty cycle of less than 90 amps. Under the extra load imposed by high power mobile applications, the alternator and/or the interconnect wiring may over heat. This is especially true of low content (minimal accessorized) vehicles.
__________________
pasdad1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 01:19 PM   #41
Senior Member
 
Cypressloser's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Alberta - East of the Rockies, West of the Rest
Posts: 628
Alternators will (not can) overheat and burn out when constantly overloaded, esp. the ones in smaller vehicles, they are not designed to supply external power. It's just not worth messing around.
A small generator is cheaper, long term solar is even better.
__________________
2013 RAM 3500 Longhorn Dually, Andersen Ultimate 5th Wheel Hitch, 2017 Riverstone Legacy 38RE, 960 Watt Solar
Cypressloser is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2015, 01:48 PM   #42
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 9,816
A late model Grand Cherokee, like the OP tows with, has a 160 amp alternator as standard equipment, with options up to 200 amps.

With at least 80 amps available, he can charge his 80 AH trailer battery with booster cables, without worrying about overloading and overheating his alternator.

Just don't turn on every electrical item in the Jeep while doing it.
__________________

__________________
twinboat is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
battery, boondocking, charging



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Lifeline Battery question RVNewbie55 MH-General Discussions & Problems 12 03-07-2015 03:51 PM
Battery question Joe Jeffries National RV Owner's Forum 6 02-26-2015 05:41 PM
Battery charging question Algoma Newmar Owner's Forum 22 02-23-2015 07:34 AM
Charging system question Milom Winnebago Industries Owner's Forum 17 09-15-2014 05:54 AM
Dimensions 2000 Watt inverter, no battery charging, need help ASAP! FIRE UP Winnebago Industries Owner's Forum 29 02-24-2014 12:36 AM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:33 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.