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Old 10-31-2012, 05:55 PM   #1
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Boondocking Vancouver, BC to Alaska

Hi all, looking to plan one of the bigger road trips we've done so far from our new home in Vancouver up to Alaska. We are shooting for about 14 days in June, July, or August of 2013 and looking for any recommendations on routes, stops, advice, etc. We camp out of my A.R.E topper so nothing really needed other than a pickup sized spot. We camp a lot in BC so no issues there, just really looking for people experienced in that route who can provide some insight. We are very interested in taking in some river fishing, hiking, kayaking perhaps, anything we can do along the way. These type activities would be where we want to spend our trip budget and not on the nightly RV parking spot if possible!
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Old 10-31-2012, 06:06 PM   #2
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First thing you need to do is purchase a current version of the Milepost. That book will list almost EVERYTHING that is available on ALL of the routes that will take you to Alaska.

I have done that trip twice now and most of the time I am parking off the grid except for when I want to take a break from the daily grind of driving and also catch up on laundry and rest.

There are so many places to pull off the road for a nights stay or longer. I have my favorites which are generally located around the 300 mile mark daily drive. That mileage differs from day to day. I also take one route north and another route south just for different scenery and things to do.

There are other publications that a re good but start with the Milepost.

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Old 10-31-2012, 06:29 PM   #3
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First thing you need to do is purchase a current version of the Milepost. That book will list almost EVERYTHING that is available on ALL of the routes that will take you to Alaska.

I have done that trip twice now and most of the time I am parking off the grid except for when I want to take a break from the daily grind of driving and also catch up on laundry and rest.

There are so many places to pull off the road for a nights stay or longer. I have my favorites which are generally located around the 300 mile mark daily drive. That mileage differs from day to day. I also take one route north and another route south just for different scenery and things to do.

There are other publications that a re good but start with the Milepost.

Dr4Film ----- Richard
This is very helpful thanks. I see the current version for sale is still 2012 do you know when they release the new one? I'd like to get 2013 if it comes out in time for our trip.
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Old 10-31-2012, 09:13 PM   #4
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Also another worthwhile book is "Travelers Guide to Alaska Camping". Lot of good general info along with campsites, both commericial and public, from BC to Alaska. Covers all the major routes. I found it invaluable in planning our 2013 trip.

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Old 11-01-2012, 09:19 AM   #5
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This is very helpful thanks. I see the current version for sale is still 2012 do you know when they release the new one? I'd like to get 2013 if it comes out in time for our trip.
March 19, 2013

The Milepost 2013: Kris Valencia: 9781892154309: Amazon.com: Books

The book written by the Church's referenced above by Spikester is also an excellent resource for the trip.

Dr4Film ----- Richard
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Old 11-02-2012, 01:53 PM   #6
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Given the weather you might encounter (even in the 'summer'), plus the very serious chance of, well, a chance encounter with a 4-legged citizen of Alaska.

You might want to give some serious thought to getting a truck camper, even if only a borrowed or rented one.
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Old 11-03-2012, 08:05 AM   #7
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Given the weather you might encounter (even in the 'summer'), plus the very serious chance of, well, a chance encounter with a 4-legged citizen of Alaska.

You might want to give some serious thought to getting a truck camper, even if only a borrowed or rented one.

We did it in 07.Ditto on Milepost, invaluable, Bears can smell food thru lots of stuff, and usually can get to it. We encountered several! But we have a Motorcoach conversion, 40,000 lbs,lotza stainless steel.
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Old 11-03-2012, 08:13 AM   #8
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We did it in 07.Ditto on Milepost, invaluable, Bears can smell food thru lots of stuff, and usually can get to it. We encountered several! But we have a Motorcoach conversion, 40,000 lbs,lotza stainless steel.
We did the Alaska trip first time this summer, 2004 Monaco, 40 foot with Jeep tow car 4 down. did see lots of bears , not a place to stay in a tent, just my thought. Best trip we ever did, lots to see.
Good Luck, enjoy no matter what you chose.
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Old 11-03-2012, 10:22 PM   #9
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Thanks for all the input. We sleep in the back of a lockable fiberglass A.R.E camper. I have a bear bag and rope and know bear protocol. Looking more for routes and activities along the way. We like to get off in bush planes for fishing and rafting so looking for info on things line that too.
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Old 11-04-2012, 06:05 AM   #10
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Thanks for all the input. We sleep in the back of a lockable fiberglass A.R.E camper. I have a bear bag and rope and know bear protocol.
As a pilot I've spent a lot of time in the far north, I can still hear the words of the old-timer that gave the first bear safety course I took.

"The only thing more dangerous than a bear is someone who thinks they know all about bears."

Now I'm not saying you don't, but the bears you will encounter up there are NOT like what you'll come across down south.

They have a very short season in which to feed, and feed they do! They've learned all the tricks too. You put your food in a bear bag. To them that's a red flag there's food. If they can't get the bag they'll look around because they KNOW there's food around. Their second choice will be where they can smell that the food USED TO BE.

The back of your truck.

I've seen them try getting into airplanes because there HAD been meat or fish in there.
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Old 11-04-2012, 07:25 AM   #11
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As I mention in previous post and also as a pilot [I second Murf2u], first trip to Alaska this summer in my 40 foot RV,most common traveler I did see, with best way to get around had the class C or a camper on a 4 wheel drive truck. If I was to do it again? I would seriously consider the truck with the camper on the back. Lots of places you can go without worry as to turn arounds places to park etc.
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Old 11-08-2012, 04:27 PM   #12
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Thanks for info all, i probably miss spoke when i said i know bear protocol - i've heard this before .

"The only thing more dangerous than a bear is someone who thinks they know all about bears."

However, we will continue on our plan of using our truck camper and trying to be as safe as possible along the way. We have gotten some great input and the books will be very valuable. We are considering a ferry ride for one way just to save us some time since we're only going to have about 2 weeks. Should we try to see Denali? the Dempster? The Dalton? What sigts in Yukon? thanks!
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Old 11-09-2012, 06:53 AM   #13
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Holy Cow! You are going to be driving some very long days and nights. When I had done that trip a few times previously, I always plan on taking two weeks just to get there and another two weeks to get back. That includes one stop at a RV Park to stay 2 nights just to rest from driving everyday and to do laundry. I usually try for 300 miles a day and about 6 hours of driving.

I guess the BIG difference is the rig that I am driving versus yours and your age.

Good luck and safe travels.

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Old 11-09-2012, 11:00 AM   #14
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If you are intent on doing the trip this way, do yourself a big favour.

Thoroughly clean the bed of your truck, with strong soap & hot water solution. Then get one of those hitch mounted cargo racks and mount a cooler or two and or a cargo box there and keep all food in that and only that. When you make camp, first thing you do is get the food away from the truck.

You do not want the box of your truck to smell the slightest bit like anything a bear might even think of as food.

Also, don't get too caught up on bear spray, it's nearly useless until the bear is way too close to you, and if the wind is the wrong way and you get backspray, you will be in an even worse situation.

Carry a Fox40 whistle and one of those aerosol air horns like they use a sporting events. Bears have pretty good ears and they really dislike loud noises, it hurts they're ears and they'll bugger off pretty quickly after a blast pointed at them.
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