Go Back   iRV2 Forums > CAMPING, TRAVEL and TRIP PLANNING > Boondocking
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-17-2004, 04:15 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Averill Park, NY, USA
Posts: 16
We have a truck camper and are always on the go so charging up the batteries hasn't been an issue. Now we are planning on staying longer than 3 days without driveing so my first thought was a generator. With limited space (plus I hate to part with the money) I was wondering if there is any reason I shouldn't just let the truck run for an hour each day. Any thoughts? Thanks.
__________________

__________________
Mick9064 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 07-17-2004, 04:15 PM   #2
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Averill Park, NY, USA
Posts: 16
We have a truck camper and are always on the go so charging up the batteries hasn't been an issue. Now we are planning on staying longer than 3 days without driveing so my first thought was a generator. With limited space (plus I hate to part with the money) I was wondering if there is any reason I shouldn't just let the truck run for an hour each day. Any thoughts? Thanks.
__________________

__________________
Mick9064 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2004, 05:42 AM   #3
Community Moderator
 
RV Wizard's Avatar


 
Country Coach Owners Club
Appalachian Campers
Gulf Streamers Club
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Chattanooga, Tn.
Posts: 12,062
Running the truck at a high idle will charge the battery(s); the time needed will need to be checked to assure you have them fully or near fully charged in one hour. If you have room you may want to add another battery or two to carry you the distance. If the batteries you now have are older you may want to be able to isolate them from the new ones or just replace them too if you increase the size of the battery bank.
__________________
Mike, RVIA & RVSA Certified Master RV Technician
Amy, Dr. Assistant - Roxie & Mei Ling, four legs each
2000 Gulf Stream Scenic Cruiser 450 hp & 1330# torque
06 Saturn Vue, 06 Chevy Z71 4x4 & 2014 Corvette Z51 M7
RV Wizard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2004, 01:13 AM   #4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 26
If your house and chassis batteries are paralleled, it will take a long time to charge the house batteries. If they are not paralleled and there is no isolator, you can use a marine switch to select which battery is charged by the alternator. You must be sure not to change over when the engine is running, though. Even then, an automotive alternator delivers a heavy initial charge and then drops off as it gets warm.
__________________
Bill and Susan

84 Barth 30 tag powered by ht502/Thorley
bill h is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2004, 05:52 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
rehcuobbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Georgia
Posts: 166
I am in somewhat the same situation! We blacktop overnight and in real cold weather on the way South in January, my two batteries will only feed the furnace till four AM. I do not have the room to add more batteries. While the alternator will give real decent power to charge, how much of it gets through the standard truck and RV wiring? Not a whole lot I would think, gauge is too small. If this is correct, anyone have an answer to correct that situation? Run a seperate feed through an isolator to feed only the batteries direct from the alternator? If so, what gauge should be used and what detachable hook-up would be used between truck and trailer? Thanks in advance to you guys and gals that are not electrically challanged!
__________________
Bob and Lois, Snowbirds!

2006 32' Sunny Brook
rehcuobbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2004, 10:26 AM   #6
Junior Member
 
Jeffrey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Racing Capital of the World
Posts: 12
With the price of fuel (or gas), I would think running a EU1000 would pay for itself over a somewhat short period of time. If you have a diesel, you do need to be concerned of wet-stacking. For me, I would rather run a $600 dollar engine instead of a $6000 engine.
__________________
1999.5 F350 Crew Cab PSD (not at all stock) Lariat. 2007 Cyclone toyhauler, DEKA 8A8D 245 Ah AGM battery. Lovin' life travelling with my best friend and our young kids, BIG dogs, and a cat.
Jeffrey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2004, 08:05 PM   #7
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
....If you have an electronically controlled generator you won't have any diesel slobbering.....It takes care of itself...never had a drop of juice, but have had some white smokeing on startup on cool mornings-even though I run the pre-heat cycle....may have a problem with the electronics?.....geof
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2004, 05:08 AM   #8
Community Moderator
 
RV Wizard's Avatar


 
Country Coach Owners Club
Appalachian Campers
Gulf Streamers Club
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Chattanooga, Tn.
Posts: 12,062
Bob, with a large isolator you can increase the gage of the wiring "charge line" back to the battery bank on the trailer and do a quicker job at recharging the house batteries and at the same time protect the chassis battery from overcharging. Use an isolator of the same or greater rating of the altenator. If you can stand a degree or two lower setting on the furnace T'stat; this will help a lot too. Once you awaken you can turn it up to knock off the chill. If the battery bank is out in the cold an insullated box might help a little.
__________________
Mike, RVIA & RVSA Certified Master RV Technician
Amy, Dr. Assistant - Roxie & Mei Ling, four legs each
2000 Gulf Stream Scenic Cruiser 450 hp & 1330# torque
06 Saturn Vue, 06 Chevy Z71 4x4 & 2014 Corvette Z51 M7
RV Wizard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2004, 11:56 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Texas Boomers Club
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Gilmer, TX -- USA
Posts: 126
Another thought to save on power ---- by using an inverter, you could keep warm while sleeping using electric blankets. Kick on the heat when you get up ---- Works for us..

don
__________________
Don in E Texas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2004, 10:23 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Rick A's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Boerne, TX
Posts: 521
Send a message via Yahoo to Rick A
In preparing for boondocking, I added a second 31 series deep cycle battery and a 58 watt solar panel. I am about to add a second 100-120 watt solar panel. This takes care of my power needs. In the winter time, I have been able to set the heat at 60, and have been able to stretch my batteries about 5 days. That is with minimal use of other electric appliances. Takes less space than a generator.
__________________
2005 F-250 XLT 4X4 V-10
2006 Wildcat 31QBH
Rick A is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2004, 08:06 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Aviator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Mission Viejo,Ca USA
Posts: 131
Boondocking is the only way we camp other than the Nascar race, well, I guess that is kinda boon docking too. Anywho, although we have the big Onan Gen on the 5'er, I did just pick-up a honda EU2000i for under 1K and man is it quiet. I plan on using that in the winter vs the Onan as I don't need the 30amp service with out the aircon running. The little fella can handle the microwave/coffee maker/toaster if needed, well, maybe not all at the sametime.
And we call this camping,,, What a hoot.
__________________
1-2004 Harley-Davidson Fatboy

2006 Ford King Ranch F350DW 4X4 w/Towpac 6.0
Aviator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2004, 07:56 PM   #12
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Heading to CO
Posts: 1
Like Jeffery said, my only concern would be wet stacking.

wet stacking info
__________________
soon to retire from the Navy
feddoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2004, 10:03 PM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 78
My concern is that this technique does not work. Except for very special, custom made setups using AGM batteries, it is physically impossible to charge a standard wet cell battery from 50% to full in an hour. It would melt from the heat. There are many people who truly believe that they have "charged" their batts using the engine at idle. They have been fooled by not having proper testing equipment. A battery that is connected to any charging system, even for a short while, will show a much higher voltage. The lights get brighter and the gauge in the RV says "full" so the owner thinks it is charged. Not so. Battery "meters" in RVs are voltage devices that do not show actual charge. There is no way around the fact that if you take out 50 amp/hrs, you're going to have to put 50+ amp/hrs back. Actually more than 50 because no battery charges at 100% efficiency. So, figure on something like 60 amp/hrs or maybe a hair more to fully recharge a 50% discharged batt. An automotive system may have a 100 amp alternator, but that only means that the alternator is capable of putting out 100 amps. That does NOT mean that the alternator will charge a battery at 100 amps. Automotive charging systems limit the voltage so as to not fry headlights and dashlights and other such things. So, the charging rate is limited by the max voltage. Charging voltage should track battery temperature but that's a different issue. If your charging system could actually put 20 amps into a battery, you are still looking at more than 3 hours charging time. Towards the end, the charging will taper off and you will be lucky to get 5 amps into the batts. At idle speed for a diesel, you will be doing well to put 10 amps into the batts with a conventional charging system. So, perhaps 6 hours charging time? Not practical. Would I charge with the engine in an emergency? I would certainly try. But a small generator and a good converter/charger is hands down a better choice.
__________________
ATVr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2004, 11:21 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Ken Lenger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Tucson AZ
Posts: 392
Excellent summary ATVr.
__________________

__________________
2014 Winnebago Adventurer 32H
2011 Honda Fit Toad
http://www.klenger.net/32h-adventurer.html
Ken Lenger is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Generator Question Rnicfingrp Newmar Owner's Forum 4 05-29-2008 12:29 PM
generator question Bob N Deb MH-General Discussions & Problems 4 04-16-2008 02:23 PM
AC Generator Question Jackm Winnebago Industries Owner's Forum 7 02-17-2008 10:54 PM
Generator Question Amandaw Monaco Owner's Forum 4 08-15-2007 05:42 PM
Generator Question Jack Barbic MH-General Discussions & Problems 12 03-21-2006 01:10 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:25 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.