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Old 09-05-2018, 08:36 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Mobius View Post
......The RV actually has the aqua hot system.


This is the best solution for boondocking. Use the aqua hot. It is also the only solution which will send heat into the water bay to prevent your pipes and tanks from freezing. You need to run the aqua hot anyway to provide hot water for showering.....just let it do itís thing and heat the coach as well. Since it runs off your 100-150 gallon diesel tank, it provides the longest running solution without emptying a much smaller propane solution, and no worries about carbon monoxide poisoning or low oxygen killing you as well.
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Old 09-05-2018, 08:40 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Pigman1 View Post
No matter what hydrocarbon fuel you use, LP, kerosene, fuel oil, or anything else, one of the by-products of that use is water vapor. In a cold climate just living in an RV traps the water vapor inside because they are so tight. This is from exhalation, perspiration, cooking, washing, etc. This is why windows get water build up on the insides and walls actually absorb the moisture and if cold enough develop an ice sheet between their inner and outer surfaces. Result:?? Rot, rust, little or no insulation value, and a cold, dank environment.



Not me, but if you can live with it without asphyxiating yourself, go for it.
So you donít use any heat source?
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Old 09-05-2018, 08:47 AM   #17
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but I was constantly wiping the windows off.
You'll do the same thing with the kerosene heater..

I've used kerosene heaters in my home for years, not a problem.. If they are burning correctly and you have a good batch of kerosene, there is very little odor.

I've also used vent-less propane in my MH, it will have the same issues as vent-less kerosene; Exhaust venting, O2 depletion, fire hazards, water vapor.

Refueling the kerosene would be a new factor. Take it outside, or if it has a removable tank.

These heaters are about 95% efficient, so converting BTUs is a good for compare.

One gallon Kerosene = 135,000 btu
One gallon Propane = 91,000 btu
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Old 09-05-2018, 05:52 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by weredoingit View Post
So you donít use any heat source?
We use standard RV forced air furnaces powered from the RV propane system. These vent all products of combustion (CO, CO2, water vapor and any other) outside the RV. Air is heated by a heat exchanger so it doesn't add moisture to the interior.
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Old 09-05-2018, 08:21 PM   #19
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We used a kerosine heater as the heat source for a beach cabin for many years. A standard cylindricaĺ unit, which produced lots of heat and a cheery light. Odor was not noticeable, the flame was always burning smoothly. There was some condensation, as expected, but CO was not a problem with a clean flame. The negative feature was that the beds felt damp.
There is odorless kerosžne, typically used in Alladin lamps, but you pay extra for this.
We have a wall-mounted power-vented propane catalytic heater in our boat, but the manufacturer has long been out of business.
Our Winnebago Brave has a vent from the furnace that keeps the wet bay tanks from freezing. A pair of portable electric heaters provide most of the heat, unless the temperature is very low. My experience with ceramic heaters has been poor. They lose about 20 to 30 percent of their hear output each year, when used frequently.
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Old 09-12-2018, 10:05 AM   #20
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The difference between an RV furnace and a portable heater is pretty simple. An RV furnace is both vented (combustion gasses are exhausted) and it has a fresh air supply for combustion oxygen.

The little dual pipe fixture out the side of the RV is both a "chimney" and an air intake.

Portable heaters have no avenue for exhausting combustion gasses, and they consume the oxygen in the room to make "fire." "People do it all the time" is not a reasonable answer to these problems. And cracking a window is not a solution to both exhausting combustion gasses and supplying fresh oxygen for combustion.

If your RV has a furnace, use it. Fuel is fuel, so replenishing propane is not much different than replenishing kerosene except that propane is more readily available...both for 'refill' and exchange. If you are concerned about the battery power required to run the furnace, a modest investment in a 100 watt solar system (about $175) will keep your battery topped off. Save your money on a kerosene heater and apply it to solar for your battery. Add panels if your appetite for 12 volt exceeds the capability of a single panel.

If your boat does not have an RV style furnace, get one and install it. You may be able to get one that burns diesel instead of propane, but they are pricey. The principle is the same...a furnace with both an exhaust vent and air intake...and, in some cases, a fan to distribute the warmed air to boot.

You may be imagining moving your kerosene heater from the RV to the boat and back again, but what might be acceptable for an occasional night will soon hurt you over the long term. CO poisoning can be cumulative from repeated exposure and insidious. Continuous exposure over the course of a winter may not kill you. It might just make you really sick. But then again, one bad night can kill you.
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Old 09-12-2018, 10:22 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by jimmoore13 View Post
The difference between an RV furnace and a portable heater is pretty simple. An RV furnace is both vented (combustion gasses are exhausted) and it has a fresh air supply for combustion oxygen.

The little dual pipe fixture out the side of the RV is both a "chimney" and an air intake.

Portable heaters have no avenue for exhausting combustion gasses, and they consume the oxygen in the room to make "fire." "People do it all the time" is not a reasonable answer to these problems. And cracking a window is not a solution to both exhausting combustion gasses and supplying fresh oxygen for combustion.

If your RV has a furnace, use it. Fuel is fuel, so replenishing propane is not much different than replenishing kerosene except that propane is more readily available...both for 'refill' and exchange. If you are concerned about the battery power required to run the furnace, a modest investment in a 100 watt solar system (about $175) will keep your battery topped off. Save your money on a kerosene heater and apply it to solar for your battery. Add panels if your appetite for 12 volt exceeds the capability of a single panel.

If your boat does not have an RV style furnace, get one and install it. You may be able to get one that burns diesel instead of propane, but they are pricey. The principle is the same...a furnace with both an exhaust vent and air intake...and, in some cases, a fan to distribute the warmed air to boot.

You may be imagining moving your kerosene heater from the RV to the boat and back again, but what might be acceptable for an occasional night will soon hurt you over the long term. CO poisoning can be cumulative from repeated exposure and insidious. Continuous exposure over the course of a winter may not kill you. It might just make you really sick. But then again, one bad night can kill you.
Installing a propane furnace in a boat is not a good idea.

According to ABYC, a boat regulating organization, un-attended propane appliances are not allowed in boats. Propane stoves are approved because it is expected that you wil be in attendence while using it. They are also equipped with shut down thermal couplings on every burner.

If your insurance company finds one, they could cancel your coverage.
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Old 09-12-2018, 06:00 PM   #22
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We used our RV propane heater for 16 years of boondocking/full-timing. Loved it!!
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Old 09-13-2018, 08:21 PM   #23
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If combustion gas is being vented into the living/sleeping area a low level detector will make one aware of any health/safety risks.

CO Experts Ė Carbon Monoxide monitors

https://www.kidde.com/home-safety/en...arms/kn-cou-b/


Some more reading
https://www.energyvanguard.com/blog/...noxide-Monitor
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Old 09-13-2018, 09:19 PM   #24
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I used a kerosene heater in the boat 38 years ago; no way would I do that today. The water vapor made the hull sweat excessively, and providing enough ventilation to avoid CO poisoning etc I think actually made it colder than just using the electric space heater only. Also, isn't kerosene pretty expensive these days?

Diesel-fired vented furnaces are available from marine-supply sources; I suppose one could be installed in an RV. But don't even consider toting a cheap kerosene heater back and forth; that's a good way to become a statistic.
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