Go Back   iRV2 Forums > CAMPING, TRAVEL and TRIP PLANNING > Boondocking
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-03-2014, 05:45 PM   #57
Senior Member


 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,282
Quote:
Originally Posted by yourpcgeek49 View Post
Anybody have suggestions for the EPDM Rubber roof on the Heartland Bighorn? The "Sticky Feet" brochure specifically says ""Sticky Feet" are not for use on RV's with rubber ... roofs!"

Well you could still use the brackets, just need to drill and use screws. :( Use plenty of Dicor sealant or eternabond tape over the screw heads to waterproof.


Maybe other suggestions will follow....
__________________

__________________
pasdad1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 09-04-2014, 07:07 AM   #58
Senior Member
 
Gocoffeer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 1,137
I ran some screws thru my brackets. I will agree that the sticky type glue down panels would pose an issue on the rubber roof design.
__________________

__________________
Craig Gosselin
1994 Fleetwood 33H
1995 Fleetwood 30H (parts vehicle)
Gocoffeer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2014, 10:31 AM   #59
Senior Member
 
Smitty77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Over the next hill, around the next curve...
Posts: 3,305
wanted to kill two birds with one SP install. Temecula Valley RV used residential roof rack mounts. We ran the two rails along the side of the coach spanning the large sunroof over our coaches shower.

1) Up a bit higher, and closer to the edge, so less chance of shadows from the AC Covers and Cover over the Fantastic Fan vents.

2) The solar gain is reduced to near zero from the shading of the sunroof dome. Still get light in, yes with some reduced brightness. And, it is much quieter when sleeping at night during heavy rain or hail storms!

X's 4 240W Sharps/Panasonic 48V panels are on this rack. X's 1 is roof mounted with combo 3M 9500 and mechanical brackets screwed into the fiberglass roof. For a total of 1200W.

We had angled galvanized sheet metal also added to the front and rear of the raised panels, to keep tree limbs from getting caught under the bracket ends. These bent sheets of metal are just 3M 9500 glued down to the roof.

14 months now, with zero problems.

This AC Covers remain the highest point of the roof, by just under three inches.

This residential roof mount racking system may help others with limited roof space. We had room to not use these on our 40' rig, but I really wanted to reduce the solar gain and noise from the large shower sunroof. I know our AC worked much faster, and did not cycle on as much, with the self shading.

Best to all,
Smitty
__________________
Roo II is our 04 Country Coach Allure 40'
OnDRoad for The JRNY! Enjoy life...
Smitty77 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2014, 10:47 AM   #60
Senior Member
 
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Buxton, North Dakota
Posts: 3,335
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smitty77 View Post
wanted to kill two birds with one SP install. Temecula Valley RV used residential roof rack mounts. We ran the two rails along the side of the coach spanning the large sunroof over our coaches shower.

1) Up a bit higher, and closer to the edge, so less chance of shadows from the AC Covers and Cover over the Fantastic Fan vents.

2) The solar gain is reduced to near zero from the shading of the sunroof dome. Still get light in, yes with some reduced brightness. And, it is much quieter when sleeping at night during heavy rain or hail storms!

X's 4 240W Sharps/Panasonic 48V panels are on this rack. X's 1 is roof mounted with combo 3M 9500 and mechanical brackets screwed into the fiberglass roof. For a total of 1200W.

We had angled galvanized sheet metal also added to the front and rear of the raised panels, to keep tree limbs from getting caught under the bracket ends. These bent sheets of metal are just 3M 9500 glued down to the roof.

14 months now, with zero problems.

This AC Covers remain the highest point of the roof, by just under three inches.

This residential roof mount racking system may help others with limited roof space. We had room to not use these on our 40' rig, but I really wanted to reduce the solar gain and noise from the large shower sunroof. I know our AC worked much faster, and did not cycle on as much, with the self shading.

Best to all,
Smitty
A side benefit is that it will help with UV deterioration of the sky light. Very good idea.
__________________
2003 Winnebago Adventurer 38G F53/ V10 605 watts of Solar
1999 Winnebago Brave 35C Handicap Equipped
F53/V10
1999 Jeep Cherokee & 1991 Jeep Wrangler Renegade
John Hilley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2014, 10:46 AM   #61
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Traveling/Volunteering Full Time
Posts: 30
Another question on the overall solar design: Am I correct to assume that the voltage drop calculations are additive? If I have a 1.1% voltage drop in the run from the panels to the combiner box, and a 1.3% drop in the run from the combiner box to the solar Controller; I really have a 2.4% voltage drop from panels to controller??
__________________
yourpcgeek49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2014, 06:52 PM   #62
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 101
actually its worse than that, your first drop from the panels to the combiner is based on x voltage starting, so if you have a .2 volt drop on 20 volts that would be a 2% drop, but out of your combiner to the controller you are starting at a lower voltage due to the preveious drop .2 would be even biggger as the output is lower. this is where MPPT and high voltage panels help. you can reduce the voltage drop from the panels to controller simply due to its higher starting voltage.

ken
__________________
kenn_chan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2014, 06:25 PM   #63
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Traveling/Volunteering Full Time
Posts: 30
Of Course!!! Thanks for your help!
__________________
yourpcgeek49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2014, 10:18 AM   #64
Senior Member
 
JFNM's Avatar
 
Newmar Owners Club
Solo Rvers Club
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Mountain West
Posts: 1,060
Quote:
Originally Posted by yourpcgeek49 View Post
There was a question that another poster asked that I have not seen the answer: How do you get the wires down from the roof?

I have seen various comments about "going down the refrig vent", but I'm not really clear how that is done? Actually putting the wires inside the vent pipe??? How do you exit to connect to the rest of the electrical system?

A related question, how do you secure the wires on the roof? More screws in the roof?
I asked this question once so, adding to what has already been said...

The 'bottom' of my refrigerator vent already had a whole bunch of wires (from elsewhere) running into the electrical 'compartment' space (under the refrigerator and accessible from inside the RV). So, I secured my array wires in the vent, pushed them thru a hole in the vent 'floor' with the other wires and sealed it all back up. Working fine so far. I can imagine this would not be as easy on some rigs.

I securing the wires on the roof by using Adel clamps at many locations. Mostly bolted to the panel frames and other existing bolts (vent cover). I am not yet totally happy with the transition into the refrig vent but have some ideas. Some things you just have to engineer as you go and then do it again repeatedly until satisfied - not enough time to do it right the first time. :-)
__________________
JD & Buddy (the ferocious feline) - Full timer out west
2005 Newmar Dutch Star 4023 | 2010 Wrangler (daJeep) | 650 Watts Solar
My Adventures
JFNM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2014, 11:12 AM   #65
Senior Member
 
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Buxton, North Dakota
Posts: 3,335
I punched holes for standard 1/2" conduit fittings and used cable glands to transition through the side of the refrigerator vent.

Cable Glands
__________________

__________________
2003 Winnebago Adventurer 38G F53/ V10 605 watts of Solar
1999 Winnebago Brave 35C Handicap Equipped
F53/V10
1999 Jeep Cherokee & 1991 Jeep Wrangler Renegade
John Hilley is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
power, solar



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Solar advice needed please RonInFlorida Going Green 23 04-15-2014 10:19 AM
Solar Power Question donie Going Green 23 02-05-2014 12:41 PM
Portable Solar chargers bubbajean Going Green 1 08-14-2013 07:19 AM
No power when plugging in RedWing Nut iRV2.com General Discussion 5 06-27-2013 02:37 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:43 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.