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Old 11-03-2012, 09:31 PM   #15
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Your 2500 watt inverter is about the most that your battery bank can handle. What refrigerator do you have? The mode switch should toggle it between automatic (electric on shore power and propane when not on shore power), electric and propane.
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Old 11-03-2012, 10:22 PM   #16
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Here is my 2 cents on batteries. No one buys batteries. We only Rent them. They all fail eventually. Buying fancy batteries with long warranties may give you a warm and fuzzy feeling. However, most batteries are killed by improper maintenance. I recommend measuring the hole and filling it with batteries from Walmart or Sams club. When they are murdered in a couple of years just replace them. Since you have spent half what fancy batteries cost you have brand new ones and don't have to pay 1/2 for the balance of the warranty on the old ones.
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Old 11-03-2012, 10:44 PM   #17
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You need at least a 50 amp controler and if the panels are only 18 volts or so an MPPT controler is a waste of money. You will need at least a # 2 gauge wire from panels to controler to batteries. Put the controler as close to the batteries as you can without being in the same compartment. Buy a temperature sensor with the controler.

FUSE THE POSITIVE WIRE INTO AND OUT OF THE CONTROLER !

Set the controler to charge @ 14.8 volts @ 80 degrees F as per Trojan's instructions to get truly charged batteries.

Anything less and you have wasted some of your money because the power will not get to your batteries. Buy a Trimetric meter to moniter the batteries.

Rule of thumb: 100 watts of panel per battery.

I full time and have 400 watts and 4 T-105s and a 50 amp controler. I have power to spare.
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Old 11-04-2012, 10:56 PM   #18
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Good advice Ralph... I saw a guy selling a used Morningstar TS-60 for 160, I wasn't sure if I should buy a MPPT-60 at that time, so I passed it. TS-MPPT-60 is being sold at 400-500 range, kinda too expensive. I'll keep eyes open.

I'll follow your points hopefully I can build a working one. Thanks all!!
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Old 11-12-2012, 11:10 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Hilley View Post
Your 2500 watt inverter is about the most that your battery bank can handle. What refrigerator do you have? The mode switch should toggle it between automatic (electric on shore power and propane when not on shore power), electric and propane.
the fridge is dometic, not an oe but updated one when the oe was shot in 2010. i remember i saw "mode" on the panel above the doors, i'll try it when i go to storage next time.
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Old 11-12-2012, 08:01 PM   #20
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You are on the right track although I would consider wiring the panels straight series for a 48 volt configuration, that will make the 20 Amp MPPT controller run more efficiently.


Ed
Not exactly correct. Higher voltage will enable use of lighter gauge wire or longer wire runs from the panels to the controller but this is not what limits the controller's ability to charge the batteries. Wiring in series may exceed the max Voc of the controller and it also greatly reduced panel output if one of the panels is shaded at all. Three 17.7v panels in series would be more than my Blue Sky 3024 MPPT 30 amp controller can handle as it tops out at 45.6V.

Before your wire up your panels and damage your controller check with the tech support people for confirmation of your setup. It is not what you know but what you know that is not so that can get you into trouble.

The MPPT charge controller is going to use the heat sensor to adjust charge voltage so as not to overheat the batteries and so generate more outgassing with flooded type batteries like the Trojans you bought and shorten their life. The controller is going to charge at a low voltage if it is set for charging lead acid batteries as compared to AGM type.

You may get 5 amps per solar panel but only for a limited number of hours per day which is what in total determines how much the controller can provide in the way of charge to the batteries. If you have 200 AH at 12v with the 4 Trojan batteries and discharge them 50% overnight then your charging setup if it is all that is used (excluding charging from the alternator for example) needs to replace 100 AH of charge during the hours of sunlight.

Once your system is in place and assuming you have a monitoring device like the Tri-metric you will know how much charge is being taken from the batteries and how effective your panels are in replacing that charge. You can also accurately assess your RV's baseline power demand.
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Old 11-13-2012, 09:45 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by ralper View Post
You need at least a 50 amp controler and if the panels are only 18 volts or so an MPPT controler is a waste of money. You will need at least a # 2 gauge wire from panels to controler to batteries. Put the controler as close to the batteries as you can without being in the same compartment. Buy a temperature sensor with the controler.

FUSE THE POSITIVE WIRE INTO AND OUT OF THE CONTROLER !

Set the controler to charge @ 14.8 volts @ 80 degrees F as per Trojan's instructions to get truly charged batteries.

Anything less and you have wasted some of your money because the power will not get to your batteries. Buy a Trimetric meter to moniter the batteries.
Hi ralph, couple questions -
1) 2 gauge wires in all connections - it's kinda huge. thinking 4 gauge throughout. i read some online posts and came up with these numbers, won't it be acceptable?
2) on my controller i can set to bulk at 14.8v, but don't see temp selection and no temp sensor input. on what make/model of controller you see it?
3) my coach comes with an xantrex full time voltage meter, which is working good.
4) good idea on fuses before and after controller.
thanks.
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Old 01-29-2013, 07:18 AM   #22
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Trojan T105 are supposed to be charged at 14.8v. If your controller allows it just set it for 14.8v and don't worry about amps. Amps will vary with stage of charge.
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