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SarahW 10-29-2011 10:01 PM

No Spare Tire??
 
Several of the new coaches we have looked at lately do not have spare tires on board. Is this typical? One salesman said, "just call roadside service." HUH?? Does roadside service provide a tire? What's up with that?

Sorry for this goofy question, but we are buying our first motorhome and this just seems .... odd. :confused:

Mr_D 10-29-2011 10:10 PM

Not odd at all, very few MH's have a spare. None of our Type A's have had one and we've never even had a flat while on a trip. We do have roadside service though. Have never used it for a tire.
Most of the roadside service trucks can bring a tire to you or fix it on the spot if it's still usable.

SarahW 10-29-2011 10:23 PM

Thanks, Mr. D. It still seems weird to me, though. :D

cj5 jeeper 10-29-2011 10:29 PM

Our 2000 Rexhall had a spare, and we used it when we lost a tire in the middle of Nevada. When we bought a new Rexhall in 2008 it did not have a spare, and there was no place one would fit. I asked Bill Rex why there was no spare, and he told me that he used to check the spares on older units that came in for service and most had the origional spare and it was so old it was junk.

Mr_D 10-29-2011 10:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SarahW (Post 996329)
Thanks, Mr. D. It still seems weird to me, though. :D

It does freak some people out!! But I have very little tire trouble in comparison to some others. In fact I've only had one blowout since I started driving in the early 60's and that was on a GoodYear on the '97 Jeep some three years ago.

Conquest102 10-29-2011 10:33 PM

I carry unmounted tire NOW. We had 1 belt break in tire 1 blowout and 1 flat on dually. In my case they are truck size NOT semi-truck size so the roadside guys usually don't have them on hand. On my dually flat guy came out was for semi's didn't have tire that would fit. He said if I would have had tire he could have swapped it no trouble. Now I carry one just incase.

From what I have read here most folks don't but they also drive A's with HUGE tires on them. Which most roadside services carry because that's what they deal with all the time.

WeatherTodd 10-29-2011 10:34 PM

figure a new tire is $300 or so on the manufacturers end. Cost adds up quickly.
You can buy one on your own to keep in a basement compartment or even under the bed inside. Seems the 22.5 wheels are scarce in the used part world.

kalynzoo 10-29-2011 11:12 PM

Lots of reasons given for no spare: weight, size, danger of replacing tire yourself, added cost, decreased mpg because of weight...I'm sure there are more.
If you get a blowout, even with roadside assistance, figure it will cost you a whole day at least and lots of money. If your in or near a big city someone may have a 22.5 RV tire in stock. With luck, you will be able to use a duel, limp to a safe place, wait a day or two for a 22.5 to be delivered to the tire dealer, and then pay top dollar plus shipping for the emergency tire.
I have a used 22.5 unmounted tire in the center of the well, out of my way in a place I can't imagine using for storage. I purchased it prior to a Mexico Track Tour. It is now over 8 years old (it was old when I purchased it). I presume if I had it mounted in an emergency I would only drive to the nearest major tire dealer, where I would order and wait for a new replacement tire.
One more thought, if the RV were to come with a mounted spare you would then have 7 or 9 tires to replace every 5 years. I just replace 6 tires for just over $3k, and prices went up again...do you really want to spend $550 dollars for a spare tire?
Happy Trails.

sdennislee 10-30-2011 01:48 AM

I carry an unmounted spare in the basement.

As others have stated 22.5" tires are hard to come by on short notice.

I was in Edmonton, Canada when I needed a tire. Took 2 days to get the tire and Edmonton is a big city.

Full.Monte 10-30-2011 07:04 AM

What about 19.5 inch tires? Are they even harder to find than the 22.5 inch tires?

mikron 10-30-2011 07:35 AM

There have been lots of threads on this and IMO I carry an unmounted tire. We have 22.5 Michelin tires on our 2008 coach. I bought a new tire from Sam's club for $428.00 with tax and had a tire rack made to fit under the chassis behind the gas tank. Most replys on this subject stated could not get a tire on the road and waited for sometimes days. We have Coach net for road service and have read on this site they won't mount a spare tire. Guss I would need to call a truck service for that.

bldrbob 10-30-2011 08:29 AM

My motorhome came with a new mounted spare tucked in a compartment.After hauling it around for 8 years I needed it this fall.Noticed some bulging in the sidewall of the outside dullie and decided to change it before it blew and did damage.Without the spare I probably would have taken the chance and kept going .I will get a new tire before the next long trip since the spare only has 800 miles on it. but it is from 2001.

ga traveler 10-30-2011 08:48 AM

I think the MH manuf. removed the spares for the oldest reason in the world, Money. I have been motorhoming since 1974. I have had 4 blowouts. I would not leave home without a spare. I can change a tire and be underway in less that 25 minutes. If you don't carry a spare, you are at the mercy of the roadservice. they can charge any price the feel like for the tire. I have had customers tell me they were sold used tires at high prices. When the dot date was checked, they were out of date. In other words they picked up out of date tires for free and sold them for top dollar. I am sure there are a lot of decent people who would not do this, but why take a chance.

Cat320 10-30-2011 08:52 AM

Even if you have a mounted spare...you'd have to carry some heavy duty equipment to change it. The spare and wheel are very heavy, plus you'd need a big jack and huge torque wrench.

Pigman1 10-30-2011 09:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdennislee (Post 996381)
I carry an unmounted spare in the basement.

As others have stated 22.5" tires are hard to come by on short notice.

I was in Edmonton, Canada when I needed a tire. Took 2 days to get the tire and Edmonton is a big city.

Yep, me too. You ought to have a flat in Glennallen, Alaska on a Saturday afternoon. The tire repair folks had to come out of Wasilla, and the tire (not the one we were looking for) was in southern Anchorage. We were back on the road Tuesday morning. This is why we carry an unmounted spare and the tools to change it out. And, yes, I can change a tire as well as break one down and remount one.

Pigman
2008 Tiffin 40' Allegro Bus
2011 Chevy Silverado Toad

MaverickBBD 10-30-2011 09:46 AM

It says in my owner's manual "DO NOT attempt to change a tire yourself". These weight over 110#s and that is what I pay CoachNet to do.

jzick 10-30-2011 09:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pigman1 (Post 996571)
Yep, me too. You ought to have a flat in Glennallen, Alaska on a Saturday afternoon. The tire repair folks had to come out of Wasilla, and the tire (not the one we were looking for) was in southern Anchorage. We were back on the road Tuesday morning. This is why we carry an unmounted spare and the tools to change it out. And, yes, I can change a tire as well as break one down and remount one.

Pigman
2008 Tiffin 40' Allegro Bus
2011 Chevy Silverado Toad

If you have the skills and the tools, carrying a spare and the equipment to change it makes sense. Most of us, however, do not have the skills or experience and many, like me, should not be wrestling a 100+ pound tire and wheel, not to mention breaking the lugs loose or jacking the coach. We depend on Coach Net and credit cards for a problem like a flat tire. In fifty plus years of driving all types of vehicles on all types of roads I have never had a blow out. There is always a first time and if it happens we will deal with it. A few days' delay getting a tire will probably not be important in the long run.

slickest1 10-30-2011 10:00 AM

You don't need to change it yourself, but having a spare even an unmounted one will save you time and money. Most RV's use a low profile tire common to Rv use and the trucking industry uses a different size for the most part. Most tire dealers don't stock the RV sizes so if you are out somewhere and need a tire you may have to wait for one to be shipped to your repair guy and it won't be cheap. I carry a good used tire I bought and mounted it on a used wheel and have the necessary tools to change it if I cant get any roadside service. But that's just me.

puttin 10-30-2011 10:09 AM

Whatever MH you end up with, just make sure you have a mounted tire with it...there are lots of good reasons to have it-believe me.

Scooter 10-30-2011 10:24 AM

saraw:

Our now departed W/I 2004 27C did have a 19.5" spare mounted underneath.

Our new to us 2003 Dolphin LX 6355 had no spare. After much thought and asking around, we bought a MOUNTED 22,5" spare and crammed it into an outside compartment.

GS ERS, AAA, FMCA will be happy to come to you and change a MOUNTED spare tire. Not so much for an UNMOUNTED tire. Perhaps, not at all. Depends on where you are and the location of a service truck that has the equipment to dismount and remount your tire. After hours and weekends/holidays make this more dicey.

Most people do not have flats, it seems.:cool: We like peace of mind and not being tilted on a road shoulder for xxx hours or days waiting for a specific service truck. Or a tire to be shipped to your location.

Please, somehow, carry a MOUNTED spare tire.

Conquest102 10-30-2011 11:11 AM

The 2 times I had guys come out to do roadside change it took less than 10 minutes to switch the tire. Its very straight forward to do IF they have the tools to do it. If you have either a loose tire or mounted tire it makes it easier for the tire guy to get you back in motion faster. He won't have to hunt down a tire and you know at least what kind of shape the tire is in. I understand there are a lot of older folks who can't do the labor part but that's what CASH is for.

WeatherTodd 10-30-2011 11:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Full.Monte (Post 996454)
What about 19.5 inch tires? Are they even harder to find than the 22.5 inch tires?

no actually those tend to be really easy to find since they are used on more than just motorhomes. (think panel vans, bread trucks, etc)

JC2 10-30-2011 11:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikron (Post 996479)
There have been lots of threads on this and IMO I carry an unmounted tire. We have 22.5 Michelin tires on our 2008 coach. I bought a new tire from Sam's club for $428.00 with tax and had a tire rack made to fit under the chassis behind the gas tank. Most replys on this subject stated could not get a tire on the road and waited for sometimes days. We have Coach net for road service and have read on this site they won't mount a spare tire. Guss I would need to call a truck service for that.


Did Coachnet say they this about not mounting a tire? If so, then I will seriously consider switching to someone else. Fortunately we have a spare mounted under the rear of our MH but if what we get in the future does does have the same, I intend to, at minimum, have a tire stashed in one of the storage bays and expect the road service people to be able to mount it.

mikron 10-30-2011 11:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JC2 (Post 996657)
Did Coachnet say they this about not mounting a tire? If so, then I will seriously consider switching to someone else. Fortunately we have a spare mounted under the rear of our MH but if what we get in the future does does have the same, I intend to, at minimum, have a tire stashed in one of the storage bays and expect the road service people to be able to mount it.

Coach Net as I understand it will swap a full mounted tire. They won't change the tire off the rim and remount a tire onto the rim.

Clifftall 10-30-2011 11:58 AM

Surely you could pay a little extra to the driver , I would imagine. The service call is the larger part of the expense.

Clifftall 10-30-2011 12:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by clifftall
Surely you could pay a little extra to the driver , I would imagine. The service call is the larger part of the expense.

I just called Coach Net and they would do as I stated above. The charge to change tires on my rim would be my share of the service call.

Max Hubrich 10-30-2011 12:23 PM

The first question you will be asked when calling your roadside service provider is "do you have a spare?"

After 2 blowouts and two flats, the blowouts were probably due to under inflation. The first one I had was because of a improperly installed RR inner flexible valve extension being cut by the wheel cover.

I not only have a mounted spare, but I also keep a pressure sender for my tire monitoring system on it. This scale allows me to move the whole rig far off to the side for the corner wheel I am weighing.

My rig came with a spare, and it lowers and raises up into a "pocket" aft of the rear axle.

I carry the correct socket, 3/4" breaker bar, a 12" extension and a 8 ft piece of pipe, to change the tire out. I usually call roadside service now, but I have done it myself because the tire changer guy couldn't come up with the correct size tire.

My problems seem to have solved themselves since I now inflate the rear axle tires to the max cold tire pressure on the sidewall, which is higher than the Michelin pressures posted in their charts require by my actual axles weight.

I get all my seven weights on a ground level, grain loading scale close to my home. They are happy to help me. I just maneuver my wheel/s, axle/s where I want them, blow the horn, and she jots down the figure for that horn "Toot". Cost all of $5. It helps to have a friend to locate you exactly on the scale where you want it to be.

I do - LF, RF, Front axle

LR, RR, Rear axle

Total rig weight

PS: those figures are all confidential-:eek:

JC2 10-30-2011 12:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by clifftall (Post 996694)
I just called Coach Net and they would do as I stated above. The charge to change tires on my rim would be my share of the service call.


I could/can live with that.:thumb:

Clifftall 10-30-2011 12:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JC2

I could/can live with that.:thumb:

Me too

JC2 10-30-2011 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by clifftall (Post 996712)
Me too

Thread timeout:whistling:

How do you like the SMI brake system. We have the Ready Brake on our current rig but hopefully will be going to a pre-owned DP if we find one to our liking and would consider SMI's version for diesels.

Clifftall 10-30-2011 12:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JC2

Thread timeout:whistling:

How do you like the SMI brake system. We have the Ready Brake on our current rig but hopefully will be going to a pre-owned DP if we find one to our liking and would consider SMI's version for diesels.

Love it. Soooo simple.

sdennislee 10-30-2011 12:51 PM

The weight of a the 20 ton jack, torque wrench, spare rim and 6' cheater bar is more than I want to carry.

I keep the unmounted spare to control the cost of the tire and to expedite the process, mostly for cost.

This summer driving back to Alaska I was forced to purchase a 22.5" tire in Edmonton $700+, the same tire in Alaska was $540.00 still high. I found the same tire in the lower 48 for $448.00.

Scooter 10-30-2011 01:17 PM

clifftall: That is essentially what CoachNet told me. The kicker is that they have to find a service truck that is equipped to dismount your tire off the rim and remount your new one. Not all road service trucks are so equipped. That means looking further out from your location, if necessary.

If after hours, you would be expected to pitch in $$ for overtime, plus the extra labor. Still, a small price to pay to get up and running.

Clifftall 10-30-2011 01:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scooter
clifftall: That is essentially what CoachNet told me. The kicker is that they have to find a service truck that is equipped to dismount your tire off the rim and remount your new one. Not all road service trucks are so equipped. That means looking further out from your location, if necessary.

If after hours, you would be expected to pitch in $$ for overtime, plus the extra labor. Still, a small price to pay to get up and running.

I look at it this way. Coach Net would rather find me such a service truck than pay to tow me. What do you think?

Tom-NC 10-30-2011 01:34 PM

Hi,

I feel sorry for those that don't have spare tires because when you get a flat you are at the mercy of a local tire dealer and his price is $$$$$$$$$.
Then you have to have it mounted by road service guy more $$$$$$$.

On my Winnebago I have a spare and have used it a number of times. Road service takes it out from where it is stored and mounts it on wheel and puts bad tire in storage area. Piece of cake.

A friend of mine didn't have a spare and had a bracket made for the rear of his RV, bought a rim and a tire and whola(sp) has a continental tire on the rear of his coach.

For those that thinking getting a tire for your blowout is easy go to Canada, Yukon or even Alaska and try to get one, good luck.

Lastly you can't change the tire yourself as the torque of the wheel lugs is 450lbs. Try getting that off with a lug wrench LOL.

A spare tire is a must in todays market.

Good luck!
:thumb::thumb::thumb:

wa8yxm 10-30-2011 01:35 PM

I grew up and up and up on a dairy farm, Today I'm over 300 pounds and over six feet tall, I can pick up and mount a 22.5" Mitchlin XRV.

I also have the needed wrench to remove/replace the lug nuts (Have actually done it)

I can also pick up my wife's mobility scooter. (250 pounds)

NOTE: Based on how much "Fun" it is mounting a 22.5.. I'd not want to try a 25" tire.

Think about what I just said.. Add to this I have a few handy tools and know how to cheat. (Use the jack to lower the axle instead of raising the tire to slip it on)

Think about this... and you may start to get the idea of why I don't even THINK about getting a spare for this rig.

Mr_D 10-30-2011 01:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WeatherTodd (Post 996338)
Seems the 22.5 wheels are scarce in the used part world.

Not here, I found them very easily at any large truck tire place or wrecking yard. I drove to one of the many truck wrecking yards and picked up 4 Alcoa rims and 2 matching steel ones. I told the workers what I wanted, they directed me to the yard and said to find what I wanted and they'd take the tires off for me. Didn't take very long either.

Mr_D 10-30-2011 01:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cat320 (Post 996539)
Even if you have a mounted spare...you'd have to carry some heavy duty equipment to change it. The spare and wheel are very heavy, plus you'd need a big jack and huge torque wrench.

No jack needed if you have levelers correctly sized. The torque wrench could be a problem, but a trip to Harbor Freight and $70 will get you one that can go to 650 ft lbs (my wheels take 500 ft lbs). I have one but I NEVER plan on changing a tire. Just too much weight for me.

Mr_D 10-30-2011 01:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Max Hubrich (Post 996700)
My problems seem to have solved themselves since I now inflate the rear axle tires to the max cold tire pressure on the sidewall, which is higher than the Michelin pressures posted in their charts require by my actual axles weight.

The pressure moulded into the sidewall of a TRUCK sixe tire is NOT the maximum the tire should ever carry. It is the MINIMUM pressure to support the maximum rated weight of the tire.

Quote:

From page 2 of the 06/07 Michelin RV Tire Guide: "If you look at the tire's sidewall, you'll see the maximum load capacity allowed for the size tire and load rating, and the minimum cold air inflation needed to carry the maximum load."

From page 6 of the GoodYear RV Tire and Care Guide
"How much air is enough?
The proper air inflation for your tires depends on how much your fully loaded RV or trailer weighs. Look at the sidewall of your RV tire and you’ll see the maximum load capacity for the tire size and load rating, as well as the minimum cold air inflation, needed to carry that maximum load."

"007" 10-30-2011 02:04 PM

Well after 25 years of driving with a spare putting many miles on 6 coach's I have never had the need of using the new spare that I have been carrying around.
So I now have no spare on coach because the spare I had to use because of a cut in one of the duels.
Could never had changed the tire anyway because they had to use a sledge hammer to get it off the rusty mount on Axel, my body couldn't have even lifted the tire or sledge hammer.
Had a good look at the 8 year tires when they were off for brake job and I'm going to try for the Michelin 10 year warranty. :cool:
All the miles traveled never had a blow out either. :dance:

Pigman1 10-30-2011 02:26 PM

Although I have Coach Net coverage and would use them if it was to my advantage when mounting a spare, any tire guy that showed up at my rig and couldn't dismount a flat and remount a spare that I had or he brought would be promptly run off and reported back to Coach Net. That's what he's supposed to do. Since we travel in remote areas in Alaska, Canada, and the US, we're often in places where there is NO CELL SERVICE to call anyone. Rather than wait for someone to do me a favor, I'd rather do it myself and not have to wait for God knows how long until a good soul comes by. The incident in Glennallen Alaska required the tire guy to make a 400 mile drive. Coach Net paid for the call but I had to put an off brand tire on the rig, and it took 3 days to get it done. With my own spare it would have been a 2 hour job, either for a local or me and I know Coach Net would have been happy to pay the local guy if I found him. As it was the bill to Coach Net was $680 and I paid $550 for the wrong tire.

Pigman

JC2 10-30-2011 02:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by clifftall (Post 996720)
Love it. Soooo simple.


Thanks, good to know, now back to regular programming.:dance: er, I mean original thread.

gfs1943 10-30-2011 03:10 PM

Like many others, my wife is really uneasy about travelling without a spare tire. Our Itasca (used) did not come with a spare. As far as I can determine, it didn't have a spare when new.

My plan now is to first find a spare, then when I have a chance I want to find a spare wheel and have the tire mounted before I take any long trips to Alaska or Canada. My MH has the lug wrench and extension bar to remove the lug nuts. If I ain't heavy enough (I'm not a big fella), maybe a big guy will come along and help. If not, I know a couple of tricks that may break the nuts loose (lug nuts, that is).

If at all possible, even when I get a spare, I'll call roadside assistance to come out and change it.

SarahW 10-30-2011 06:35 PM

OK, so .... you who carry a spare, do any of you have the different size tires on the front and back? Do you carry a spare of each size? :confused:

sdennislee 10-30-2011 06:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SarahW (Post 997017)
OK, so .... you who carry a spare, do any of you have the different size tires on the front and back? Do you carry a spare of each size? :confused:

Same size front and rear. Spare identical to others. Spare needs to be same diameter at a minimum, cant mix tires on an axle.

SarahW 10-30-2011 06:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdennislee (Post 997018)
Same size front and rear. Spare identical to others. Spare needs to be same diameter at a minimum, cant mix tires on an axle.

I know that sizes must be the same on an axle. I guess I thought a coach like this one has different size tires on the front/back. Is it just the style of the wheel that makes them appear different? (duh)

http://fleetwoodrv.com/gallery/BDR_et.jpg

bucks2 10-30-2011 07:29 PM

Sarah, short answer is yes they will be exactly the same size. The rears are duals, two tires and rims. The inner tire and rim on the back will be mounted just like the front, the outer tire and rim is identical, but turned around so the two "faces" of the rims are together.

SarahW 10-30-2011 09:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bucks2 (Post 997053)
Sarah, short answer is yes they will be exactly the same size. The rears are duals, two tires and rims. The inner tire and rim on the back will be mounted just like the front, the outer tire and rim is identical, but turned around so the two "faces" of the rims are together.

:o Well, I learn something every day, Bucks!! :blink: Thanks for setting me straight. :laugh:

Max Hubrich 10-31-2011 06:07 AM

Yup, Sarah- "bucks2" is right.

An exception to this is a new double wide radial, softer, tire available for trucks to replace some of the "dual" rear wheel setups. Some Motor Home owners have gone to them also. Again, I don't think that you should worry about that decision.

Try finding one of these rascals when you have a blowout/flat on the side of the road on a busy interstate, lets say going around New York, or LA:banghead:.

bucks2 10-31-2011 08:17 AM

You guys got me started thinking about spares because if a tire blew out it could be days before it was replaced. And you might have to be towed in, and it could be a terrible experience. So I bought a replacement engine, because that could be a lengthy delay getting that replaced. And then I thought about the front axle because those don't grow on trees either. You know a bearing could go bad at any time because I don't check them before every trip. And then I thought about the drive shaft that could have a universal joint go bad and then flop around and bend itself, so I got a replacement, just in case. Sometimes I drive on roads that have rocks thrown from other vehicles which could break a window, or I could have one of those coaches that the windshield just works itself out. Then I'd be stuck beside the road with a big open spot in the front of the rig, so I now carry a complete set of windows with me. And then I got to thinking and.............

I don't carry a spare tire, or the tools to change it. For those who can change a 22.5 in 30 minutes you're in the wrong proffession. The tire industry needs your skills. Tire stores with all the equipment sitting right there take that long and they do it all day every day. You'd make a fortune.

Ken

Clifftall 10-31-2011 08:34 AM

Now I know why I wear suspenders and a belt. I also carry an unmounted spare.

Conquest102 10-31-2011 08:45 AM

Bucks2;

You just need some plastic and some duct tape you can fix anything LOL.

Always-RVing 10-31-2011 09:07 AM

Recently happend.

Flat tire... Roadside service said I have two options.
(1) Tow in
(2) Replace with spare (Your Spare)

I don't have a spare... They told me I would need to purchase a replacement tire and call back when ready.

If you don't have a spare, you better hope you're near a town that sells your tire.

I read most RV's dont' come with a spare due to extra cost, extra weight, taking up losts of space and unlikelyhood the owner could change it.

An unmounted 22.5" tire can weigh 100 lbs. What does a mounted tire weigh?

So, carry an unmounted 22.5 tire? Carry a fully mounted 22.5 tire?

The spare DOT date code will still age whether you use it or not.

melvonnar 10-31-2011 12:02 PM

After over 25 years and nearly 500,000 miles and 7 blow outs; I wouldn't leave the driveway without a spare. Once I thought I'd replace all my tires when I was in Alabama, ordered them at a tire dealer, stayed in a campground a week waiting for them, finally canceled the order and left.
Do all those that don't carry spares want to go the waiting, and waiting, and waiting?
Not me.
What happens when your out in the bonnies and blow a tire and you don't have a spare?
I hope you have very deep pockets.

teera travel 10-31-2011 01:40 PM

sounds like most of you have never lost a tire in the middle of nowhere out of cell phone service.i have buy a used tire an rim itsmoney well spent!!

Davdeb1 11-15-2011 01:22 PM

Sorry, but is it possible to change a tire on a 40 ft DP? Ok I know I can get the rig off the ground with leveling jacks but, but is it safe to try this out?
Plus, Just how big and strong would you have to be to get these tire off and replace one?

Clifftall 11-15-2011 01:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Davdeb1
Sorry, but is it possible to change a tire on a 40 ft DP? Ok I know I can get the rig off the ground with leveling jacks but, but is it safe to try this out?
Plus, Just how big and strong would you have to be to get these tire off and replace one?

A few can and have the equipment to do it. Most can't and don't carry the equipment. The point is if you have a spare mounted or not, you can have a road service come out and get you on your way in short order( within one hour for me twice). You can then arrange to purchase another tire on your terms and not be held hostage ( pay retail if they can even locate one ) by the road service outfit.

Davdeb1 11-15-2011 01:42 PM

Got it, thanks. I'll put it on my list of things to get. Just bought the MH, trying to get everything I need.

Tom-NC 11-15-2011 05:27 PM

Hi Davedb,
The idea about carrying a spare is not that you do it yourself as you can't, first off the lugs have 450lbs torque on them and you would not be able to loosen them, second the tire and wheel is much too heavy for you to remove and put back on unless you have the proper equipment and know how.
The idea is to have a spare so that when your road service comes to you to fix a flat they can replace the flat with the spare and you could go on your way and find a tire store to get a replacement tire. If you don't have a spare then you are at the mercy of the road service guy and his tires prices, I repeat HIS tire prices. You don't neccessarily have to have a spare tire mounted on a wheel as they can take off your bad tire and mount a spare tire at an additional cost naturally.
Since my Class A came with a spare tire mounted on a wheel and under the chassis, when I get a flat the road service guy comes out and takes off the flat tire and then mounts the spare on and puts the flat tire back where he got the spare. Then I check around for the tire I want at different tire stores and get a new tire in place of the defective one.

I hope this answers your question we we should all carry a spare. In fact a friend of mine purchased a tire and a wheel and then had a bracket made to attach to the rear of his class A. It looks like a contiental wheel but is there if he ever needs it.
Good luck!
:thumb::thumb::thumb::thumb:

Davdeb1 11-15-2011 07:56 PM

Well, I'm convinced. Just get a good used unmounted tire, and keep it in you pass- through storage area. I'm sure a mounted one wouldn't fit. I've got two new front tires, and the back four are 5 yrs old but look almost new( no cracks ). I keep the MH garaged also. I won't be full timing for 3 years, by that time the back tires will be replaced.

Scooter 11-16-2011 08:26 AM

An UNmounted spare is better than nothing. But not much. We managed to cram a MOUNTED 22.5" spare in a pass-thru compartment. 1/3 of the tire sits on the pass-thru ledge and 2/3 sits in space. The wheel hub stops any further penetration. We drilled some holes in both sides of this compartment and wedged a horizontal 1/2" piece of rebar under the tire to hold it up. A simple piece of vertical 2x4 wood with a notch to fit under the rebar, provides more stability.

We have traveled 600 miles with this setup and no movement or other problems.

I'm too lame to take a picture and post it. Anyone who wants to PM me with a fax or phone number for the drawings I did for another RV'er, is more than welcome

campclan 11-16-2011 09:39 AM

Found used 19.5 wheel on the IRV2 classifieds at about 1/2 the cost of new wheel from Ford (I have an F-53 Chassis). Purchased new tire from Tire Rack mounted it and loaded in the coach. I am one of those guys that will wait only so long for a road service before I take matters into my own hands and do it myself so I wanted to be prepared should I need to change it out.

Always-RVing 11-16-2011 09:58 AM

Having a used umounted spare is a good idea.

Clifftall 11-16-2011 10:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Batman_777
Having a used umounted spare is a good idea.

Or even a new one.

PlayItForwrd 11-16-2011 02:46 PM

2 Attachment(s)
I'm puzzled as to why some think 22.5 tires are "hard to come by"? Many a semi uses that size tire, and any truck stop will have them, used too...

I found this out the hard way last year after poking a hole in the sidewall of a mighty Michelin with a twig. :nonono:

I aired up the inside tire to 120 and drove 25 miles to a truck stop and bought a used Michelin. The tires are piece o' cake to change with a couple of irons...

Attachment 15725
Attachment 15726

--it took the guy about 2 minutes to get it off, and about 3 minutes to get the new one back on.

I don't have a spare yet, but I have plenty of room for one. I'll be getting new tires in a couple of months, and I'll be keeping a couple of the old ones...

motofamily 11-16-2011 03:18 PM

Do freightliner chassis use different offset wheels i guess what i am asking is lets say you have a road truck with 22.5 rims will that rim work on a motorhome if so i have a few of these at my buddies shop he said i can have for a spare rim

Always-RVing 11-18-2011 04:40 PM

I just checked around for a used spare tire. Tire only....

275/70 r22.5 Goodyear: $100.00 Michelin $150.00

They told me the carcass alone is worth $100

Hey!!! Here's something else.. They told me the only reasons to get a tire made for an RV is Comfy.. and they are cheap... Cheap?

Yep.. That's what they said

SPICoaster 11-20-2011 11:27 AM

Our MH has a spare mounted up under the rear end. I have no intentions of personally changing a flat on our MH. Having one will save me a few $'s if and when I would need to have Couch Net send someone to do the job for me!

GSGracie 11-20-2011 11:46 PM

Had the MH only six months before I had a blowout on the inside rear dual. We have a full spare on a rim mounted on the back of the bus. Tried to change the wheel in a local garage near where the blowout occurred, but having never done it before, I had real trouble. The wheels had rusted on, and without the help of a Good Samaritan I would never have got it off. I was able to continue on my way and get a new tyre once we got home. I watched the professionals change the tyre and with two tyre irons about 1.5m long, it was a piece of cake. I even tried it myself, with their tuition and I would have no problem in attempting it myself in future. My spare is now brand new, and when I buy my next new tyre, I will match the spare and put two new tyres on the front and put the best old tyre on as the spare. I can replace it at any time when there are specials. My new tyre cost me over $550 so it is not a cheap exercise in New Zealand. I guess we have more wilderness than many countries so I don't want to take the chance of being stuck in the middle of nowhere. With the tyre being mounted on the bus it takes up no extra space.

Margarita1 12-07-2011 01:22 PM

Spare tire
 
We too just purchased Super C Jayco Seneca w/ no spare. I plan to buy and mount in storage bay. There seems to be enough room




Quote:

Originally Posted by SarahW (Post 996318)
Several of the new coaches we have looked at lately do not have spare tires on board. Is this typical? One salesman said, "just call roadside service." HUH?? Does roadside service provide a tire? What's up with that?

Sorry for this goofy question, but we are buying our first motorhome and this just seems .... odd. :confused:


treehouse 12-12-2011 08:54 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Earlier in this thread, Scooter explained the setup he came up with for storing his mounted 22.5" tire in his passthru storage.

He sent me a diagram and explanation, so with his permission, I have scanned it and am posting to share with other rv'ers who might want to do something similar.

Thanks, Scooter!

GSGracie 12-13-2011 11:37 AM

For the second time in less than a year I blew an inner dual on the rear. The tire was stuffed by the time I could get to a place to pull over safely, and my partner had to carry on in the toad to a doctors appointment. We were only 30 miles from the town, but I was on my own. Having a spare on the back was a life saver. I had watched the pros in the tire shop use the levers to manipulate the tire and I was able to change the tire within 45 minutes. My only problem that needed a little help was getting the bad tire back onto the back for the trip to town - I enlisted help with that.

When I got to the tire shop to replace the blowout, the only thing I had done wrong was I did not have the tires correctly aligned with valve stems opposite. Using the tire lever to manipulate the wheel made the job a lot easier and I might invest in a longer lever, for when it will undoubtably happen again. The outer tire was damaged too so I had to splash out on TWO new tires - $1240!! The call out fee to replace the tire on the side of the road would have been a third of the cost of one tire. BTW I am 60, not in great physical shape (unfit and fat) so if I can do this I suspect most people can. I would never travel without a spare, already mounted and pressured.


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