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-   -   Towing a Toad (http://www.irv2.com/forums/f85/towing-a-toad-128282.html)

SarahW 06-27-2012 12:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Arch Hoagland (Post 1224490)
I've pulled a Miata about 10,000 miles with no drop hitch, even though there is a pretty good height difference.

Never had a problem in all those miles.

I don't want the problem of the hitch dragging on the ground putting a really heavy 12,000 lb load on the receiver assembly.

I don't see where a drop hitch would add anything but the weight of the drop hitch to the receiver. :confused:

ChileRick 06-27-2012 12:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SarahW

I don't see where a drop hitch would add anything but the weight of the drop hitch to the receiver. :confused:

It adds leverage, increasing the force on the hitch during acceleration and breaking, which may eventually weaken the hitch assembly.

Sky_Boss 06-27-2012 12:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SarahW (Post 1224888)
Sorry, but we don't believe in "playing the edges of limits." We follow the manufacturer's recommendations, and in our case, it's plus or minus 2". Safety first, always.

Just for clarification...I'm with you Sister Sara. :angel:

I'm not advocating playing the edges...it is a fact that some play the edges and some step off the cliff. If you have seen my posts on these kinds of subjects, I don't sanction nor suggest going outside the operation's manual for any system.

Sky_Boss 06-27-2012 01:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ChileRick (Post 1224906)
It adds leverage, increasing the force on the hitch during acceleration and breaking, which may eventually weaken the hitch assembly.

Are you sure about that? I would suspect that a wonky angle from toad to the tow bar pivot point would exert much more up/down pressure on the hitch than a properly set drop. As an example, if the toad links were much higher then the receiver, the downward force would be rather significant. Of course the opposite would be true for a low toad anchor point.

A properly measured drop would then align forces on the same angle as the receiver is to the hitch welds. Of course, that assumes you have a good quality drop with no flex. I'm not saying there wouldn't be some up/down pressure on the hitch but much less than a badly misaligned combo of rig to toad set up.

That doesn't even take into consideration the affects on the toad's front end from misalignment. As is the case with the OP, a smaller car will generally have a lower plate connector to hitch problem. If not corrected, the downward forces put on the toad's connection could do damage to the front end of the toad even without any damage to the RV.

Conversely, I would suspect a toad that stands very tall might not suffer the affects on its own front end but the downward forces on the hitch could be rather significant. That assumes that vehicles that tall are probably on the heavy side.

ChileRick 06-27-2012 01:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by athuddriver

Are you sure about that? ........

No, just what I was told in regards to a tow dolly.

Sky_Boss 06-27-2012 01:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ChileRick (Post 1224969)
No, just what I was told in regards to a tow dolly.

Fair enough! LOL

I would think a tow dolly would think a tow dolly would also need to have a similar relationship in height to receiver as a tow bar. At least that would make sense. OTOH, regardless of the angle, the front end of the vehicle being towed wouldn't have the same problems.

Steve N Sal 06-28-2012 03:29 PM

I think the two systems would be in relation to each other. When we had our dolly the recommended height was 16-1/2" which put the tongue in a level position. Can't see where it would make any difference if it is a dolly or a tow bar set-up.

Arch Hoagland 06-28-2012 06:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SarahW (Post 1224890)
I don't see where a drop hitch would add anything but the weight of the drop hitch to the receiver. :confused:

Assume for a minute you put a floor jack under the tow hitch and jacked up the rear of the motorhome. All the weight would be on the hitch point.

It's the same thing when the hitch drags on the ground when you, for example, come out of a parking lot.

Mr_D 06-28-2012 06:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steve N Sal (Post 1226176)
I think the two systems would be in relation to each other. When we had our dolly the recommended height was 16-1/2" which put the tongue in a level position. Can't see where it would make any difference if it is a dolly or a tow bar set-up.

Our dolly (KK 460) said 18" to top of the ball. I had to get a slight drop receiver then use a 1" extension ball to get it right.

When I towed the Jeep GC four down I had to raise the hitch receiver by 4".
If I were to try towing the '05 Ody four down again I just plug directly into the receiver.

One of the problems with gas units is the long rear overhang. Lower the hitch too much and it'll drag, in fact some come close even with just the receiver as is.

SarahW 06-28-2012 09:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Arch Hoagland (Post 1226385)
Assume for a minute you put a floor jack under the tow hitch and jacked up the rear of the motorhome. All the weight would be on the hitch point.

It's the same thing when the hitch drags on the ground when you, for example, come out of a parking lot.

I see what you're saying, but I disagree. The rear wheels never leave the ground, so all the weight is never on the hitch.

Mr_D 06-28-2012 09:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SarahW (Post 1226575)
I see what you're saying, but I disagree. The rear wheels never leave the ground, so all the weight is never on the hitch.

It does happen, takes a tow truck or jacks and blocks (or maybe all) to clear it.

Arch Hoagland 06-28-2012 11:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SarahW (Post 1226575)
I see what you're saying, but I disagree. The rear wheels never leave the ground, so all the weight is never on the hitch.

You are correct...all the weight usually isn't on the hitch when it drags. So if the rear end weight was 20,000lbs how much weight WOULD be on it?

That's an unknown but it's a lot more than it's designed for. And that's why I won't use a drop hitch.

SarahW 06-28-2012 11:56 PM

Suit yourself. We choose to have a level tow bar per the manufacturer's specification.

bgsc 07-22-2012 01:52 PM

After you get your height differences corrected (personally I would not have more than a 2in. difference) the other point to check is the distance from were your tow bar attaches to the motor home and the swivel point on your tow bar according to Winnebago should be no more than 8 inches. On my old Adventurer on the Workhorse chassis I was 20 inches and broke 5 of the 6 1/2 bolts holding the factory installed hitch to my motor home. Not trying to scare anybody but sometimes when we have to add additional pieces to achieve the proper hitch heights we can loose sight of the safe distances so we do not put additional stress on our hitches or tow bars.


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