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-   -   Chassis air condition (http://www.irv2.com/forums/f105/chassis-air-condition-139527.html)

Vincy 10-08-2012 09:26 PM

Chassis air condition
 
Hello Everyone,:flowers:
I have a National Tradewind LTC freightliner chassis and a cat engine. The dash air is no longer cold slowly decreasing. I think it might be low on freon? Where are the valves to fill the unit, what type of freon is used, and is there a manual on the air system??
capstan1947@comcast.net
Thank you for your time and info.

John

calhyatt 10-09-2012 01:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Vincy (Post 1334053)
Hello Everyone,:flowers:
I have a National Tradewind LTC freightliner chassis and a cat engine. The dash air is no longer cold slowly decreasing. I think it might be low on freon? Where are the valves to fill the unit, what type of freon is used, and is there a manual on the air system??
capstan1947@comcast.net
Thank you for your time and info.

John

Find your evaporator, probably located under the front hood and look for a low pressure service valve near the evaporator. Probably a R-134 unit that you can top up with a kit from any good auto parts store. Wally knockers has them. After you gather your stuff, start the engine and turn on the Dash AC. On High with the selector in normal. Check and see if the condensor fan is running. Mine is also located in the front of my chassis. If not, you will have to make a jumper and jump across the low pressure safety cutout to get the compressor and condensor fan to run. Plug your refill adapter on the low side pressure fitting and read the pressure. If it is low, Not empty, squeeze the trigger on the refill device and add R-134, check the pressure again. If the guage reads no pressure then you should stop there and get a real AC shop involved. You don't want to ruin your unit. If the pressure come up a little remove the low pressure jumper you made and see if the condenser fan runs now. Continue to add R-134 until you achieve the proper pressure on the little guage on the refill kit. Somewhere in the green band on my unit. You should be wearing safety glasses during this entire operation so you don't get hurt. Gloves are also helpful. The amount of charge required is usually on a data plate on the evaporator housing. Mine is about 3.3 lbs of R-134. 40 ft. Freightliner Chassis with Cat engine. If you don't feel comfortable doing any of this than please seek help from a REAL AC shop.
Good luck and seeya on the road.

Jimooo 10-09-2012 02:21 PM

You can also buy the R-134 freon with sealant in it to stop a small leak, I would recommend that.

Happy RVing, James

Wizard 10-09-2012 02:23 PM

Also keep in mind that if its low then its leaking. AC systems do not use up freon. If its leaking it will need to be repaired eventually.

SPICoaster 10-09-2012 05:07 PM

Keep in mind that if you use a freon recharge that has any type of sealant in it that you run the risk of gumming up the entire AC system. This means you'll be looking at replacing most if not all components of the AC system when you take it to a service shop. If its low on freon then you have a leak that needs to be repaired properly. But just because the dash AC doesn't blow cold it doesn't mean you're low on freon.

Note that not all systems can be tested with the cheap testing systems you can purchase in the local auto parts store. Example; an Evans dash AC system can only be properly recharged by a full evacuation of the system and then a recharge with the correct amount freon.

There are many reasons that dash units can


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