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-   -   Tire pressures and wandering (http://www.irv2.com/forums/f258/tire-pressures-and-wandering-173189.html)

burgman50 08-18-2013 06:32 PM

Tire pressures and wandering
 
My dad is on his first trip in our new '98 bounder 36s, with tag axle. I've driven it on on the interstate and while its definitely not my mini van, I thought it drove ok. Not great, but not bad. On his trip he said he was white knuckled the entire way. It moved all over his lane, and even cars made it move. He said he was not driving it back home until it was fixed. Now, I had told him to check air pressures, and I assumed he did. Found out today he had not, and the fronts were 85 and 72 psi. Didn't say what the rears were.

I told him I think the pressures were off enough that when he corrects them he will notice a big difference in the way it drives. So, is this a valid statement? Will there be a big improvement in drivability?

FYI, it is lightly loaded, low mileage current tires all around.
**yes we both understand the importance of maintaining correct pressures and rest assured this is the very last time that will ever happen**
Thanks!

Mknight 08-18-2013 06:52 PM

You answered the question with your last statement. If I was off 10 pounds it made a difference in mine

TeJay 08-18-2013 07:21 PM

Correct response. If you are 3-5 lbs different it might not effect driving but much greater than that and you will realize a problem. If you've ever tried to push a vehicle with low tires you'd realize how much more energy to takes to do it.

Usually what you will experience is a pull to the low tire side because of the increased rolling resistance.

Just the other day I spoke with a tire guy (Joe) at a Good Year shop. He's been in the tire business for 40+ years and knows tires. If you run any tire with 6 or more lbs to low for much distance that tire may be ruined. There are many factors to consider but by doing that the tire reaches higher temperatures which will cause internal belt damage that will show up later down the road as a possible blow-out. Consider these factors: What is the weight on the tire, the ambient temperature, how much to low was it, how far was it driven, and what is the age of the tire? All these factors and probably some more all figure in on how much damage could have been done by riding with a tire that was greater than 10 lbs to low.

A good TPMS is a great idea to protect your tire investment. For less than $400, which is the price of one tire you can monitor your tire pressure and spot a low tire immediately hopefully before and internal damage occurs.

Ask me how I know?? Back in 2000 six of us were heading to Canada for some fishing in our 1999 DS. I was driving through KC and hit a chuck hole that I never saw. All of the coffee in my cup, which was sitting on a shelf next to me spilled out and the cup never moved. My inexperience with driving a MH showed because we just drove on. Just before we entered MN. the inner right dually tire shredded. It lost its air when I hit the hole and it took another 300-400 miles to destroy the tire. A TPMS would have avoided the blow-out and shredding of the tire. Had I checked for tire damage after it happened we could have leisurely found a tire shop in KC.

TeJay

burgman50 08-18-2013 07:39 PM

Thanks guys. There is a reason this is the best forum out there. It's because of people like you! Thanks!

Ray,IN 08-18-2013 09:51 PM

According to The Rubber Manufacturers Association any tire that is operated at 20% below recommended pressure is considered to have been run-flat, and should be treated accordingly. So for a tire requiring 100psi, and allowed to run at 80psi, a professional, de-mounted, inspection is necessary.

spritz 08-19-2013 09:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TeJay (Post 1691399)
Correct response. If you are 3-5 lbs different it might not effect driving but much greater than that and you will realize a problem. If you've ever tried to push a vehicle with low tires you'd realize how much more energy to takes to do it.

Usually what you will experience is a pull to the low tire side because of the increased rolling resistance.

Just the other day I spoke with a tire guy (Joe) at a Good Year shop. He's been in the tire business for 40+ years and knows tires. If you run any tire with 6 or more lbs to low for much distance that tire may be ruined. There are many factors to consider but by doing that the tire reaches higher temperatures which will cause internal belt damage that will show up later down the road as a possible blow-out. Consider these factors: What is the weight on the tire, the ambient temperature, how much to low was it, how far was it driven, and what is the age of the tire? All these factors and probably some more all figure in on how much damage could have been done by riding with a tire that was greater than 10 lbs to low.

A good TPMS is a great idea to protect your tire investment. For less than $400, which is the price of one tire you can monitor your tire pressure and spot a low tire immediately hopefully before and internal damage occurs.

Ask me how I know?? Back in 2000 six of us were heading to Canada for some fishing in our 1999 DS. I was driving through KC and hit a chuck hole that I never saw. All of the coffee in my cup, which was sitting on a shelf next to me spilled out and the cup never moved. My inexperience with driving a MH showed because we just drove on. Just before we entered MN. the inner right dually tire shredded. It lost its air when I hit the hole and it took another 300-400 miles to destroy the tire. A TPMS would have avoided the blow-out and shredding of the tire. Had I checked for tire damage after it happened we could have leisurely found a tire shop in KC.

TeJay

SOOOO how did you like MN?

TeJay 08-19-2013 04:34 PM

Well we just passed through heading to Canada. Fishing is great but mosquitoes with numbers on their wings are tough. Were I much younger it would be a great place in which to spend more time. Yes the winters are very tough but I wintered in Maine twice (saw 60 below zero and had to walk up a mountain to work). Grew up in PA and IN for 18 years. After marriage we settled in MI. We have called AR our home now for 30+ years. Fewer people and a little less traffic with mild winters and good summers.

TeJay


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