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-   -   Dash Air Question (http://www.irv2.com/forums/f258/dash-air-question-252860.html)

smiybrneyes 07-01-2015 01:23 PM

Dash Air Question
 
I am in the market for a new to me Class A. On most of the ones I have looked at the dash air does not work. Why? If it is the compressor why do so many go bad on a Class A and not on a Class C? If it is the compressor does anyone know the approximate cost to have it replaced?

TRNewsom 07-01-2015 01:27 PM

Ours did not work either. We bought used. We had it fixed but I don't remember how much it cost.

TomandGloria 07-01-2015 01:34 PM

I don't use the dash air, but run my generator and basement air on the road. Keeps whole house cool and makes arrival into campground more comfortable. I did turn on dash air yesterday and found it needs to be recharged. Guess I'll take care of that soon.

mn.roadking 07-01-2015 02:22 PM

Especially with a DP, there is a lot of hose and connections between the dash and the compressor. Prone to leakage.

pop-sicle 07-01-2015 03:30 PM

The old use it or lose it, mechanical things are meant to be used bearings need to roll seals dry out.
Probably the seals in the compressor leaked freon out.

This would be more true if you have been looking at older coaches, mine is 2000 and had 73000 miles on it which meant it probably wasn't sitting a lot and air worked but needed some freon.

530ktm 07-01-2015 03:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smiybrneyes (Post 2629362)
I am in the market for a new to me Class A. On most of the ones I have looked at the dash air does not work. Why? If it is the compressor why do so many go bad on a Class A and not on a Class C? If it is the compressor does anyone know the approximate cost to have it replaced?

My last Adventurer was a 97 and dash worked great. It did need to be recharged once a year before summer but I would always run it monthly or more to keep the seals and oil moving around in there. I think that is the problem with so many units, they sit and do not get used. The cost for a new compressor and other parts can range around $1200 or more.

twinboat 07-01-2015 04:08 PM

I think, Class A, AC units are custom built, from aftermarket parts, using clamp on hoses, to the fittings.


There are always more chances of small leaks, then from factory made fittings.


With Class C, ACs, everything come from the chassis builder.


I found this, with aftermarket AC systems, compared to factory AC, in construction equipment.

Nowabeachbum 07-01-2015 04:14 PM

Each class C motorhome is built on a van chassis which has the air conditioner built into it. Any given van chassis is designed and built by the manufacturer with the idea that 100,000 or more could be sold in its product cycle. Everything is custom built for the vehicle. The air conditioner and all of its components are designed and tested by environmental engineers using tools like an environmental chamber to work perfectly with each other right down to the location and material used for its hoses and tubing. Again all of its components are custom to that vehicle. A Class A motorhome gets its compressor and condenser from the chassis supplier already mounted when the chassis arrives. The evaporator, dryer and pressure switches come from an air conditioner manufacturer like Evans Products who doesn't even own an environmental chamber. The hoses will be purchased from a hose and fitting supplier. The actual design effort is done by the engineers at the motorhome manufacturer. They will know little about air conditioning and will focus on fit and function, not longevity.
Obviously this is not an ideal situation and leads to lots and lots of opportunities for failure!
There is nothing to gain from replacing a working compressor. More often than not something else has caused a problem.

BeachDude 07-01-2015 04:26 PM

Being that the dash air is part of the chassis, and not the RV, it's only repaired at a repair shop that performs chassis work.

That means scheduling an appointment at Freightlighter, Ford, Roadmaster, etc... repair shop at pricy labor rates.

Then the fun begins! Unless if it's an obvious leak or main component replacement, diagnosis usually turns into a finger pointing match if it involves air mixers, ducting, electrical controls.

So..... they eventually are neglected and left inoperative.

cutlooselily 07-01-2015 04:45 PM

If you are talking about a newer class A with a v10 or even the older EFI 460 or 454 engines, all use a sanden style 134a compressor. 250-300$ new.

Install on either of these three engines is less than an hour book time for the compressor only. That is the very simple part.

Figure in, at minimum, a new dryer~accumulater 40$, expansion valve~orifice tube 15$, pag oil & freon ($varies widely)...usually around 1.75#'s for front engine class A's. If you have the internal signs of "black death", get ready, you'll most likely need a new evaporator & condenser (on top of the above) if they cannot be effectively cleaned. Get's pricy quick. FWIW, ALL modern EFI engines "cycle" the AC compressor clutch even in the dead of winter via the heat/defrost selection on the dash, by design. The purpose of this is to keep the AC compressor's internals lubricated via the pag oil suspended within the freon mix. Some go for years, some fail premature. It is what it is.

smiybrneyes 07-01-2015 05:29 PM

Thanks for the answers.

cutlooselily 07-01-2015 07:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nowabeachbum (Post 2629588)
Each class C motorhome is built on a van chassis which has the air conditioner built into it. Any given van chassis is designed and built by the manufacturer with the idea that 100,000 or more could be sold in its product cycle. Everything is custom built for the vehicle. The air conditioner and all of its components are designed and tested by environmental engineers using tools like an environmental chamber to work perfectly with each other right down to the location and material used for its hoses and tubing. Again all of its components are custom to that vehicle. A Class A motorhome gets its compressor and condenser from the chassis supplier already mounted when the chassis arrives. The evaporator, dryer and pressure switches come from an air conditioner manufacturer like Evans Products who doesn't even own an environmental chamber. The hoses will be purchased from a hose and fitting supplier. The actual design effort is done by the engineers at the motorhome manufacturer. They will know little about air conditioning and will focus on fit and function, not longevity.
Obviously this is not an ideal situation and leads to lots and lots of opportunities for failure!
There is nothing to gain from replacing a working compressor. More often than not something else has caused a problem.


False. The above doesn't compute.

HeapBigEngin 07-01-2015 10:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cutlooselily (Post 2629815)
False. The above doesn't compute.

Care to elaborate a bit more?

"007" 07-01-2015 10:59 PM

If its a Evans AC/Heater cooling dash unit the control valve maybe installed incorrectly this link will explain why problem has been around for some time on many different coach's with the Evans AC's.


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