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Dan_S 05-18-2016 09:40 PM

First trip up and down the hills
 
This is our first trip up and down the roads in the Black Hills SD. Pulling a dolly and Sable. Using the Tow-Haul our poor little V-10 was workin' it's but off! I can't even imagine what the 'real' mountains must be like!
Dan

Mr_D 05-18-2016 09:50 PM

Well, it'll make it but you will slow down!

Rich-n-Linda 05-18-2016 11:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dan_S (Post 3074884)
?..our poor little V-10 was workin' it's but off! I can't even imagine what the 'real' mountains must be like!
Dan


What does that mean? If you mean it was revving to 4,000+ rpm climbing the grades, get used to it. It's quite normal. That's the nature of a gasoline engine. It has to rev high to develop maximum horsepower to get you up a hill.

Diesels make their horsepower at a much lower rpm, which is one reason they are quieter and last longer.

Sweetbriar 05-19-2016 04:56 AM

You want that engine spinning. Not only for the power but also for the cooling. A high RPM has the water pump spinning fast moving the coolant faster thru the engine, transmission and radiator.

Don't worry about the high RPM. You can't hurt the engine with the gas pedal or gear shift. The engine computer has an electronic RPM limiter that will prevent you from taking it beyond designed limits. If it gets too hot it will start shutting down cylinders to use them as air pumps to help cool and will actually shut down everything if the temperature continues to go up.

Take your time and hang with the long haul truckers. No reason to be the first to the top of the hill, unless you come upon a herd of struggling high end DP's.:cool: Down shift manually if necessary to keep the RPM above 3500. Remember what gear you used to go up and use the same gear to keep the speed down on the other side of the mountain.

tim myers 05-19-2016 05:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sweetbriar (Post 3075035)
Don't worry about the high RPM. You can't hurt the engine with the gas pedal or gear shift. The engine computer has an electronic RPM limiter that will prevent you from taking it beyond designed limits.


Agreed, but it sounds like parts are going to start poking through the engine cover.

I have not been out west with my v-10 but in the east where the grades are similar but not as long and not at high altitude I find I can top most hills at around 45 - 50 and not break 4000 rpm with good energy management. That being said the Triton V-10 is pretty bullet proof.

Dan_S 05-19-2016 06:56 AM

Thanks for the replys. This is more than just a little new to us. Have to adjust our comfort zone.
Dan

LVRVLUVR 05-19-2016 07:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tim myers (Post 3075050)
Agreed, but it sounds like parts are going to start poking through the engine cover.

I have not been out west with my v-10 but in the east where the grades are similar but not as long and not at high altitude I find I can top most hills at around 45 - 50 and not break 4000 rpm with good energy management. That being said the Triton V-10 is pretty bullet proof.

figure about 15 -20 mph slower in a diesel pusher...

the diesel is quiter in the front... but not in the rear...

when they put the diesel in the front way noiser than the gas motor..:popcorn:

slowmachine 05-19-2016 07:28 AM

From conversations with a very talented NASA engineer and VW enthusiast, one of the hard (and hard to modify) limits is the heat tolerance of the piston rings. The metallurgy of the rings has to be correct for the maximum linear speed of the piston, and the coefficient of friction between the ring and the cylinder wall. He was adamant that most piston rings in use today can endure continuous operation in the 4000-6000 RPM range. Long-stroke engines would be at the lower part of the range, and short-stroke designs at the upper end. Most people are too annoyed by the noise to run their engines this fast, but the engines can withstand much more punishment than our ears.

LVRVLUVR 05-19-2016 07:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rich-n-Linda (Post 3074943)
What does that mean? If you mean it was revving to 4,000+ rpm climbing the grades, get used to it. It's quite normal. That's the nature of a gasoline engine. It has to rev high to develop maximum horsepower to get you up a hill.

Diesels make their horsepower at a much lower rpm, which is one reason they are quieter and last longer.

they also make way lower hp and torque, that's why they have to turbo charge them...

natural aspirated gas 6.8 motor makes more hp and torque than a 6.8 diesel motor...

a non turbo motor is way cheeper and less prone to failure,, and ways less in repairs to fix...


having the motor in the back you won't hear problems when they start, only when they finish..:popcorn:

LVRVLUVR 05-19-2016 07:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dan_S (Post 3074884)
This is our first trip up and down the roads in the Black Hills SD. Pulling a dolly and Sable. Using the Tow-Haul our poor little V-10 was workin' it's but off! I can't even imagine what the 'real' mountains must be like!
Dan

do you self a favor and do the 5 star tune,, you will go up the hills faster in a higher gear...:thumb:

LVRVLUVR 05-19-2016 07:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slowmachine (Post 3075171)
From conversations with a very talented NASA engineer and VW enthusiast, one of the hard (and hard to modify) limits is the heat tolerance of the piston rings. The metallurgy of the rings has to be correct for the maximum linear speed of the piston, and the coefficient of friction between the ring and the cylinder wall. He was adamant that most piston rings in use today can endure continuous operation in the 4000-6000 RPM range. Long-stroke engines would be at the lower part of the range, and short-stroke designs at the upper end. Most people are too annoyed by the noise to run their engines this fast, but the engines can withstand much more punishment than our ears.

I think the whole I can hear my engine was started by diesel pushers to justify the high cost of their rigs....do you reailize how many people change there exhaust every day so they can hear their motor run???

I remember the first thing to do with your truck was to put duals on it...


as a kid I drove front engine dragsters....to me my v 10 is quiet:dance:

Caswelld 05-19-2016 08:46 AM

:thumb: 5 Star tune will really help.

Wish Ford would make the power stroke diesel an option on the F53 frame.

computerguy 05-20-2016 07:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Caswelld (Post 3075286)
:thumb: 5 Star tune will really help.

Wish Ford would make the power stroke diesel an option on the F53 frame.

The FRED never caught on. Too many strikes against. Too heavy, too expensive, noise/heat factor up front is a lost benefit to why people like a DP, etc. Just my humble opinion from what I read about it.

CampDaven 05-20-2016 08:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LVRVLUVR (Post 3075167)
1. figure about 15 -20 mph slower in a diesel pusher...



2. the diesel is quiter in the front... but not in the rear...



3. when they put the diesel in the front way noiser than the gas motor..:popcorn:


1. Nope
2. Nope
3. Nope
Not a DvG thread! ;)
Back on topic: to the OP, relax and enjoy the ride. You have a fine setup and will get used to it.
Best wishes and Happy Trails


Dave and Nola, RV Mutants


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