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-   -   Brake Failure kills one, injures 6 (http://www.irv2.com/forums/f84/brake-failure-kills-one-injures-6-a-35349.html)

BEBOP 04-26-2008 06:48 AM

I received this video in a RV newsletter today. I think it emphasises the urgency of getting these brakes fixed on our motorhomes. I just took mine to the workhorse shop for a total check out and repair if needed.
Look at this:
http://www.kirotv.com/video/15994119/index.html
Bebop
PS: Here is the transcript with more info:
http://www.kirotv.com/news/15979650/detail.html

BEBOP 04-26-2008 06:48 AM

I received this video in a RV newsletter today. I think it emphasises the urgency of getting these brakes fixed on our motorhomes. I just took mine to the workhorse shop for a total check out and repair if needed.
Look at this:
http://www.kirotv.com/video/15994119/index.html
Bebop
PS: Here is the transcript with more info:
http://www.kirotv.com/news/15979650/detail.html

RoadRohrers 04-26-2008 07:35 AM

This is another thread on this in the Motorhome Forum here on irv2.com. The thread title is: Monaco Brakes

JWatkins 04-26-2008 07:44 AM

Tragic, but it really points out the structural issues as well as the brake issues. Personally I use the transmission, and the brakes to help slow me down. I stay off the brakes until the speed warrants some action. I then brake moderately and only enough to bring the speed down to a reasonable level. I stay off the brakes then to allow them to cool as much as possible.
Joe

Tom N 04-26-2008 07:52 AM

Wasn't this accident attributed to operator error??

-Tom

knebrdr 04-26-2008 07:58 AM

Hello,
I do not want to appear insensitive, but everyone immediately blames the industry. Maybe mandatory education, testing, and licensing is the answer. Anyone can buy an RV or high performance motorcycle and operate it with out any training. Neither of these are toys or cars and require different operating and maintenance procedures.
Randy

Corkey 04-26-2008 08:32 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Corkey:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Tom N:
Wasn't this accident attributed to operator error??

-Tom </div></BLOCKQUOTE>YES, ...

The accident happened coming down from Hurricane Ridge. Nobody, I mean Nobody in their right mind would take a motorhome to Hurricane Ridge. It's scary enough in a well maintained car/truck/SUV.

The estimated speed of the crash was around 70 MPH, I really don't know how to do 70 in 1st gear, the gear he should have used. A close look at the rig reveals a motorhome around 15-18 years old, so there are maintenance issues to consider also. It would be hard to compare this to a modern MH as chassis have changed dramaticaly.

I don't have the resources to asses blame, but the news article as presented is nothing more than extreme sensationalism, pointing the finger to ALL motorhomes as being dangerous.

If our personal vehicle (car) was to hit at that speed in this terrain, it wouldn't even be recognisable. So how could any rational person conclude a MH would far any better?

Oh, and yes, This road has a history of brake failure for personal vehicles too. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

kennersonf 04-26-2008 08:55 AM

Too me, over heated brakes = operator error 90% of the time. When watching the video, I counted seven people in the motorhome. It possibly could have been overweight also.

RoadRohrers 04-26-2008 08:56 AM

What, fair and balanced reporting. No way. Not with all these rogue motorhomes terrorizing the citizenry! Somewhere in all of that it was mentioned hundreds of fatal RV accidents annually. Hundred? Fatal? Really?

Are these machines perfect, not a chance (just read the forums). Do they require constant maintenance? Yes and then some. Most rvs do not get it. More expense. Less fun.

Tom N 04-26-2008 09:55 AM

Wonder if he had an exhaust brake or a jake brake.

A 2 stage jake brake will really slow down a heavy vehicle, especially when shutting down all valves.

I know an exhaust brake would not be as efficient.

He probably had an exhaust brake.

-Tom

Corkey 04-26-2008 10:27 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Tom N:
Wonder if he had his exhaust brake on or his jake brake.

A 2 stage jake brake will really slow down a heavy vehicle, especially when shutting down all valves.

I no an exhaust brake would not be as efficient.

He probably had an exhaust brake.

-Tom </div></BLOCKQUOTE>While there were reference's to it being a DP, photos reveal a driveshaft front to back. If it was a DP (questioning accuracy at this point) then it was a vintage front engine version. Many had leaf springs and light truck brakes. I don't know if this is the case here, just reading the photos between the lines. It appears to be a smaller class A, in the neighborhood of 30' or less.

All we (I) can do is speculate as the report is so one sided. In any case the whole thing is tragic.

DriVer 04-26-2008 10:47 AM

In my opinion, it is unlikely that any of us would suffer the same fate as the driver of this coach. Our gas powered motorhomes offer us the use of engine compression when the transmission is select shifted or a grade brake is on-line and working. Descending practically any grade can be done under controlled conditions when a driver is conscientious of his vehicle's forward speed when negotiating a grade.

Unless a bad mechanical condition presents itself at the wrong time these types of events are extremely rare.

Loss of life in this matter is most regrettable however let's all take a lesson from this and be aware when we negotiate descending grades.

The most troubling aspect of this entire dreadful affair is getting whacked in the head by a dislodged cabinet if that's what indeed caused the loss of life.

JWatkins 04-26-2008 02:30 PM

Driver, where can one find out about grade bakes? I looked in Google and most of the references seem top be trying to sell brake shoes and the like??? I am unfamiliar with the concept. I know Jake brakes, but not grade brakes.
Joe

DriVer 04-27-2008 06:26 AM

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by JWatkins:
Driver, where can one find out about grade bakes? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Joe, You've come to the right place. All the information you are going to need about the Workhorse Grade Brake" is located right here.

In 2005 Workhorse began providing us with the Transmission Grade Brake.

Transmission Grade Braking among upgrades for Workhorse chassis

Nov. 30, 2004

UNION CITY, IN., " Downhill descents are now easier on the driver and easier on the brakes with Workhorse's new Transmission Grade Braking. All 2005 W Series chassis (W20, W22, W24) {including the UFO} will feature this as a new standard system at no additional cost.

The driver activates TGB through an illuminated dashboard switch. Then he or she engages the feature by depressing the brake pedal and releasing. The transmission automatically downshifts a gear and starts to control the motor home's speed.

So on a steep decline the driver just needs to step on the brakes to let his transmission automatically provide a smooth, safe ride downhill. This avoids unnecessary wear on the brakes while providing a reassuring sense of control to the driver. No stress, no sweat: TGB does the work.

- - - -

For us that do not have a TGB, the process is called "Select Shifting". Select shifting is a process where a driver will manually downshift their vehicle as low as 1st gear if required while observing the forward speed of the vehicle while descending a grade. Typically 3rd or 2nd gear is chosen on severe grades. If you find your self slowing too much you would then manually up shift to the next gear to gain speed. If you find yourself going too fast, pump your brakes to scrub off speed and then downshift to a lower gear. Exiting the grade you would up shift to 4th or 5th gear and proceed down the road.

As far as I know the TGB is not backward compatible.


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