iRV2 Forums

iRV2 Forums (http://www.irv2.com/forums/)
-   Newmar Owner's Forum (http://www.irv2.com/forums/f103/)
-   -   Water Pressure Regulator Location (http://www.irv2.com/forums/f103/water-pressure-regulator-location-454824.html)

Winepress 07-29-2019 03:40 PM

Water Pressure Regulator Location
 
For convenience I mounted my Watts regulator in the wet bay after the hose reel. Pressure gauges on the incoming and after the regulator. The hose on the retracting reel is rated at 150psi.


I realize that some feel it should be mounted at the park source (faucet).


Today had an interesting observation. The water hose has a 20 foot run to the faucet and it's hot where I am. I was moving some stuff around and opened the wet bay door. Normal incoming pressure is about 65psi. I was surprised to see the incoming pressure at 120 psi. The solar radiation heated the hose to increase the pressure. The regulator was doing it job with 55 going into the coach plumbing.



For me, that confirms my location is the correct place.

"007" 07-29-2019 04:38 PM

Sounds like you made the right decision as to placement of your regulator.
What gets me I never use a regulator and traveled thru Canada and the USA and never had a regulator, lucky I guess.

Dutch Star Don 07-29-2019 07:19 PM

The water hose reel hoses are rated for 150 psi. I also mounted my regulator in the wet bay.

lass 07-29-2019 07:35 PM

Water Pressure Regulator Location
 
Mounted my Watts pretty much the same. Since I donít have the hose reel, from the coach connection, I use a 90 degree Camco adapter, connected the Watts to that and have a 3í section of hose rated at 150 psi. If my main hose splits from pressure, itís outside of the coach and the pricy Watts is locked in the bay compartment.

10 fan 07-29-2019 09:26 PM

I did the same with one gauge showing the incoming pressure and the watts showing the pressure going to the coach. I have seen 110 psi twice. Glad I had the regulator.

WoodyS 07-29-2019 11:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by "007" (Post 4887142)
What gets me I never use a regulator and traveled thru Canada and the USA and never had a regulator, lucky I guess.

Yes, you've been lucky! There aren't many, but there are RV Parks with 100 psi, 110 psi. -- all the time -- at their faucets.

There's one in Flagstaff, AZ that warns you when you check in and they'll give you a loaner regulator if you don't have one.

I think it was the last time we were there (winter as I recall -- snow on the ground) and the coach next to us blew out his plumbing in the middle of the night.

All the next day they were carrying out dripping stuff -- including bedding. I felt so sorry for them. But they'd been warned.

I think I've stayed in three RV Parks now with pressure over 80 psi.

Tranquil Jim 07-29-2019 11:57 PM

I don't know why folks are so against just putting a pressure regulator at the park utility post and protecting their entire system, including hose and hose reel. It's just not that hard.

As for not using any regulator, that's a version of Russian Roulette. If you do it enough times, something bad will happen. I know of one RV park with a water tower nearby that has 120 psi at the utility post tap. And, they don't post any warning signs. We've stayed in at least two other parks that were 100 psi or higher.

Depending on your hose/reel being rated at 150 psi ignores the fact that the rating is for a system in perfect condition. One small manufacturing or installation glitch in any part and you risk a failure. There is a reason why most RV manufacturers...including Newmar...strongly suggest limiting water pressure to 60 psi. But what do they know, right?

TJ

Winepress 07-30-2019 07:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tranquil Jim (Post 4887716)
I don't know why folks are so against just putting a pressure regulator at the park utility post and protecting their entire system, including hose and hose reel. It's just not that hard.



As for not using any regulator, that's a version of Russian Roulette. If you do it enough times, something bad will happen. I know of one RV park with a water tower nearby that has 120 psi at the utility post tap. And, they don't post any warning signs. We've stayed in at least two other parks that were 100 psi or higher.



Depending on your hose/reel being rated at 150 psi ignores the fact that the rating is for a system in perfect condition. One small manufacturing or installation glitch in any part and you risk a failure. There is a reason why most RV manufacturers...including Newmar...strongly suggest limiting water pressure to 60 psi. But what do they know, right?



TJ



You made my point. Having the regulator at the faucet would have introduced water pressure that was double of what Newmar recommends. I never considered what solar radiation could do to the incoming water pressure.

Best place is after the hose where it enters the coach plumbing.

Tranquil Jim 07-30-2019 08:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Winepress (Post 4888832)
You made my point. Having the regulator at the faucet would have introduced water pressure that was double of what Newmar recommends. I never considered what solar radiation could do to the incoming water pressure.

Best place is after the hose where it enters the coach plumbing.

I guess I don't go to hot enough places, but I've never seen a pressure increase due to hose heating like you describe. And, that includes stays in Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Colorado, etc. Are you using a black or dark-colored hose? I use a white one and keep as much of it as possible running under the coach to keep it out of the sun.

Not saying that it didn't happen; just that I have never experienced anything remotely similar.

TJ

FatChance 07-30-2019 10:15 PM

I have my Watts pressure regulator in the water bay between my 200psi RV Water Filter Store hose and the coach. I check water spigot pressure before I connect the hose and have pre- and post-regulator pressure gauges to monitor after that.

TXTiger 07-30-2019 10:36 PM

The water trapped in your hose between the facet and the RV may heat up and raise the pressure in the hose but as soon as you open a faucet and the water begins to flow I believe the pressure will go down and the water coming out of the facuet will be coming from uunder ground and will be cooler.

FLJOE 07-31-2019 10:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Winepress (Post 4887077)
For convenience I mounted my Watts regulator in the wet bay after the hose reel. Pressure gauges on the incoming and after the regulator. The hose on the retracting reel is rated at 150psi.


I realize that some feel it should be mounted at the park source (faucet).


Today had an interesting observation. The water hose has a 20 foot run to the faucet and it's hot where I am. I was moving some stuff around and opened the wet bay door. Normal incoming pressure is about 65psi. I was surprised to see the incoming pressure at 120 psi. The solar radiation heated the hose to increase the pressure. The regulator was doing it job with 55 going into the coach plumbing.



For me, that confirms my location is the correct place.

You may be on to something. However, since you don't have any type of regulator or gauge on the park faucet, how do you know what the actual psi was there? I mean, if the supplied water pressure at the faucet was spiking at 100 anyway wouldn't having the Watts regulator have protected you just as well by being on the park faucet instead of inside you wet bay?

waterjosh 07-31-2019 11:44 AM

I'm really glad I came upon this topic. Gave me a great idea, we have a automatic dog watering bowl that tends to blow the hose off it when the sun beats on the hose for too long, I am going to add a pressure regulator in between the hose and the dog bowl fitting. I know completely not rv related but I wanted to say thank you for triggering the idea

FatChance 07-31-2019 11:49 AM

We spend winters in the mountains in our coach. I like to have the pressure regulator in our heated water bay so it is permanently mounted there after the hose reel.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:41 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.