Journey with Confidence RV GPS App RV Trip Planner RV LIFE Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Take a Speed Test Free 7 Day Trial ×
RV Trip Planning Discussions

Go Back   iRV2 Forums > THE OWNER'S CORNER FORUMS > Winnebago Industries Owner's Forum
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-11-2008, 04:48 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 114
'03 Journey shock replacement, continued
Some of you may recall my post seeking a recommendation for shock replacement ('03 Journey shock replacement). Well, we purchased the Koni FSD shocks for the Journey. I installed them myself and got quite a workout. I replaced the front shocks using your everyday basic " drive ratchet, breaker bar and a couple of wrenches. The real work out was "breaking" the 1 " lower bolt on the bottom of each shock. I used some creative license to free that sucker! The old "Porta-Power" body jack came in quite handy freeing up that thing... and tightening as well! I did have to remove one of the two upper shock mount bolts to pivot the mount so I could remove the top bolt.
Then, after checking out the rear shock placement, I knew there was no way I could free up those 1 " top and bottom bolts without an impact wrench. Luckily, a good friend let me use his impact wrench and compressor! Although I had to just about make love to the tires and underbody of the coach the install was completed in less time than I took to loosen one front shock! My 5'6" frame and 62 year old arms just ain't what they used to be. But what a difference when you've got the right tools! Proud to have completed this task myself and looking as if the coach rolled over me, I sat back to admire those Gold classy looking shocks and enjoyed a cold glass of water and contemplated, was all this work and cost be worth it. (I'd like to think I saved some costs by doing it myself!) My wife and I could hardly wait for out first campout to see if it was all worth it. I don't know if it was wishful thinking, but just driving the Journey back to it's parking spot, I noticed a lot less sway taking turns over uneven surfaces at slow speeds.
The day of reckoning is here. Seven days after the shock installation we're headed for the Northern New England Winnebago/Itasca Rally. We put on just over 300 miles and we cannot say there is a "major" improvement in our ride over expansion joints, pot holes or the typical conditions from deteriorating road surfaces. From the outset I need to clarify two things; first, handling and second ride. Handling I will define as; sway, and pitch as we turn or go over smooth dips, etc. Handling was noticeably improved. Underway the coach didn't require very much steering correction to help with road undulation, wind, vehicles passing, etc. Unfortunately, ride; the one thing we hoped would be better was only slightly improved. We still felt the suspension hit expansion joints hard and the best way for me to describe any improvement is to say, some of the "sting" was less when we hit the expansion joints, etc.
We've logged over 34K on our Journey, we've battled falling overhead light lens, things banging in the cabinets and some loosening of things here and there. But when we got to our destination I noticed that the bedroom sliding door was hanging off its lead trolley. The screws had pulled right out of the wood (of course the wood is only particle board), dropped onto the plastic guide at the bottom and pulled it out of the wood. To boot we found a fair sized screw on the floor of the kitchen! Now, I'm sure all this didn't just happen. These types of problems are systematic over time. However, I must say, our coach has really been hitting the road hard... literally!
Our next step will be tires. We will be looking to step up to larger tires so we can run with less pressure in them and we certainly hope we'll see a much more noticeable improvement in ride then! Here's hoping!
__________________
2003 34H Journey, 300 HP Cummins, 2000MH Allison, Demco "Excalibar" Tow Bar, BrakePro and Chevy HHR
Tagalong is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 08-11-2008, 04:48 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 114
'03 Journey shock replacement, continued
Some of you may recall my post seeking a recommendation for shock replacement ('03 Journey shock replacement). Well, we purchased the Koni FSD shocks for the Journey. I installed them myself and got quite a workout. I replaced the front shocks using your everyday basic " drive ratchet, breaker bar and a couple of wrenches. The real work out was "breaking" the 1 " lower bolt on the bottom of each shock. I used some creative license to free that sucker! The old "Porta-Power" body jack came in quite handy freeing up that thing... and tightening as well! I did have to remove one of the two upper shock mount bolts to pivot the mount so I could remove the top bolt.
Then, after checking out the rear shock placement, I knew there was no way I could free up those 1 " top and bottom bolts without an impact wrench. Luckily, a good friend let me use his impact wrench and compressor! Although I had to just about make love to the tires and underbody of the coach the install was completed in less time than I took to loosen one front shock! My 5'6" frame and 62 year old arms just ain't what they used to be. But what a difference when you've got the right tools! Proud to have completed this task myself and looking as if the coach rolled over me, I sat back to admire those Gold classy looking shocks and enjoyed a cold glass of water and contemplated, was all this work and cost be worth it. (I'd like to think I saved some costs by doing it myself!) My wife and I could hardly wait for out first campout to see if it was all worth it. I don't know if it was wishful thinking, but just driving the Journey back to it's parking spot, I noticed a lot less sway taking turns over uneven surfaces at slow speeds.
The day of reckoning is here. Seven days after the shock installation we're headed for the Northern New England Winnebago/Itasca Rally. We put on just over 300 miles and we cannot say there is a "major" improvement in our ride over expansion joints, pot holes or the typical conditions from deteriorating road surfaces. From the outset I need to clarify two things; first, handling and second ride. Handling I will define as; sway, and pitch as we turn or go over smooth dips, etc. Handling was noticeably improved. Underway the coach didn't require very much steering correction to help with road undulation, wind, vehicles passing, etc. Unfortunately, ride; the one thing we hoped would be better was only slightly improved. We still felt the suspension hit expansion joints hard and the best way for me to describe any improvement is to say, some of the "sting" was less when we hit the expansion joints, etc.
We've logged over 34K on our Journey, we've battled falling overhead light lens, things banging in the cabinets and some loosening of things here and there. But when we got to our destination I noticed that the bedroom sliding door was hanging off its lead trolley. The screws had pulled right out of the wood (of course the wood is only particle board), dropped onto the plastic guide at the bottom and pulled it out of the wood. To boot we found a fair sized screw on the floor of the kitchen! Now, I'm sure all this didn't just happen. These types of problems are systematic over time. However, I must say, our coach has really been hitting the road hard... literally!
Our next step will be tires. We will be looking to step up to larger tires so we can run with less pressure in them and we certainly hope we'll see a much more noticeable improvement in ride then! Here's hoping!
__________________
2003 34H Journey, 300 HP Cummins, 2000MH Allison, Demco "Excalibar" Tow Bar, BrakePro and Chevy HHR
Tagalong is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
'03 Journey shock replacement? Tagalong Winnebago Industries Owner's Forum 20 07-25-2008 06:37 AM
Shock replacement on Journey, anyone DIY? smlranger Winnebago Industries Owner's Forum 13 02-19-2007 03:05 PM
Shock replacement smlranger Freightliner Motorhome Chassis Forum 3 01-17-2007 11:02 AM
Shock replacement Captain Bud Workhorse and Chevrolet Chassis Motorhome Forum 1 10-31-2006 12:19 PM
Shock Replacement J Stemler Winnebago Industries Owner's Forum 3 02-17-2006 02:57 PM

» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.