Free 7 Day Trial RV GPS App RV Trip Planner Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Free 7 Day Trial ×
RV Trip Planning Discussions

Go Back   iRV2 Forums > THE OWNER'S CORNER FORUMS > Winnebago Industries Owner's Forum
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-14-2019, 11:01 PM   #1
Member
 
copythat's Avatar
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Greensboro, NC
Posts: 32
2020 Winnebago View 24D Surge Protector Install

I've never given much thought to surge protection until recently. It quickly came to mind when I visited a campground that had no visible breakers on its pedestals. That was an absolute first for me! Shortly thereafter, I visited another park and had problems with two different pedestals. One offered no power and the other ended up with a melted outlet that was only visible come morning time. Luckily nothing happened to the coach but it prompted me to go out and purchase a surge protector.

I opted for a hardwired Progressive Industries EMS-HW30C with remote monitor. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002UC6RSA...=aa_scomp&th=1

I decided to install the unit after my Southwire Model 41300 Transfer Switch so I could have protection from both AC (shore) power and the RV's generator.

I looked online for some product specific install tips to make sure the project was not beyond my means. I was disappointed to find very few install videos and nothing about the Southwire Model 41300.

I took some pictures of my install and converted them into a PDF with key points highlighted along the way. I am sharing it here in case it might be of value to someone else. I offer no guarantees about the install. All I can say is it worked for me. My new RV is now protected from both shore power and the RV's generator. It sure does give me peace of mind.

Let me know if you find the piece useful. I may add additional install tips as I acquire more goodes for the RV.

Cheers,
Rob

https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link...a-764e74bef5a4
copythat is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 09-15-2019, 04:26 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
SuperGewl's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Oregon
Posts: 2,551
OK nice setup, However installing post the transfer switch I'm not sure I would do. The one thing you can normally count on is the generator being done correctly and the EMS already delays power from it for a bit to allow it to get up temp before loading it. Yes what you did does protect the electrical of the coach with the exception of the transfer switch which is usually get fried when you plug into a bad campsite outlet. I have had one Transfer switch catch fire because I didn't have a surge protector. On the second MH I installed a Surge Protector after I had an issue with a dongle (50A to 30A), one of the leads had scorch marks (high amp draw) and it did it's job and let me know there was an issue with the shore power cable by indicating it was not good.
The way you have your setup will not let you know unless the power makes it thru the transfer switch which will usually burn up before it sends power. I know some will disagree but thats my .0001 cents worth. I hope it works out for you
__________________
Retired Navy Submariner
2014 Itasca Sunstar 35F; 5 Star tuned; 2014 Jeep Cherokee TrailHawk
SuperGewl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2019, 08:27 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Tiffin Owners Club
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Las Cruces, NM
Posts: 3,893
I would have installed it before the transfer switch as well. Your generator has advanced electronics in it to make sure the voltage and frequency are stable and it really doesn't need monitoring. Faulty shore power connections can damage a transfer switch, however.

Not too late to revise your installation. Even simpler would have been to use the PI-30X which is a plug in box. Install would have been <30 seconds for the same protection.
__________________
Roger & Mary
2017 Winnebago Navion 24V (Sold)
2014 Tiffin Phaeton 36GH (Sold)
luvlabs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2019, 09:50 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 28,610
You will be fine with your install.

The auto transfer is a SWITCH. Its not going to be damaged by high or low volts. With a 30 amp RV, the potential of you seeing 240 volts due to a bad neutral is very low.

A failing transfer switch can cause low volts, so having the protection after it will protect the things that are affected by low voltage.
twinboat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2019, 06:31 PM   #5
Member
 
HISSSSS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by copythat View Post
Rob,

Excellent write up, similar to how installed mine this spring. The only minor error I saw was the caption that you used an "octagonal nut driver", it should have been a hex nut driver.

Mike
__________________
'12 Winnebago Via 25T, stock except: HWH Levelers, NovaKool RFU68000 12V Fridge,Group 31 AGM Coach Batteries, PM4 55A 55 Amp Converter, PI EMS-HW30C Surge Protector, Michelin Agilis CrossClimate Tires, TST Internal TPMS, Borg Stems, Sumo Springs
HISSSSS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2020, 01:28 PM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 7
Many thanks for the insight for the installation and the nice job. I have my Progressive Surge protector and going to install it shortly. However I will install it on the shore power side because the whole basis of a surge protector is to protect from EXTERNAL issues, most of which are questionable connections and wiring at camp sites. In addition I plan on using 2 pairs of 3 pole twist lock plugs (https://is.gd/wRiGnl) to be able to bypass it should it get damaged. It will also allow me to store the cord elsewhere rather than roll it up into 8" loops to fit in that tight area. While not difficult to coil when it's 80 and sunny out, it's a real PIA at 45 degs and raining. I'll shoot some picture once it's done.

Best Regards
M Praz
__________________
2020 Winnebago Navion D w/2016 Subaru Crosstrek Toad
Matt Praz
mattprazen@gmail.com
mattpraz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2020, 04:19 AM   #7
Member
 
HISSSSS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 93
Stuff Happens

Quote:
Originally Posted by mattpraz View Post
Many thanks for the insight for the installation and the nice job. I have my Progressive Surge protector and going to install it shortly. However I will install it on the shore power side because the whole basis of a surge protector is to protect from EXTERNAL issues, most of which are questionable connections and wiring at camp sites. In addition I plan on using 2 pairs of 3 pole twist lock plugs (https://is.gd/wRiGnl) to be able to bypass it should it get damaged. It will also allow me to store the cord elsewhere rather than roll it up into 8" loops to fit in that tight area. While not difficult to coil when it's 80 and sunny out, it's a real PIA at 45 degs and raining. I'll shoot some picture once it's done.

Best Regards
M Praz
While it's true the campground electrical will probably be what you need to protect from 99% of the time, what about when the generator has issues? It's a electro-mechanical system so sooner or later it will fail and when it does, the surge protector should be able to prevent electrical failures elsewhere in the RV. If it's easy to include the genny, I would wire it in, that's how I did it as it's a cheap insurance policy.
__________________
'12 Winnebago Via 25T, stock except: HWH Levelers, NovaKool RFU68000 12V Fridge,Group 31 AGM Coach Batteries, PM4 55A 55 Amp Converter, PI EMS-HW30C Surge Protector, Michelin Agilis CrossClimate Tires, TST Internal TPMS, Borg Stems, Sumo Springs
HISSSSS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2020, 07:42 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Tiffin Owners Club
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Las Cruces, NM
Posts: 3,893
Quote:
Originally Posted by HISSSSS View Post
While it's true the campground electrical will probably be what you need to protect from 99% of the time, what about when the generator has issues? It's a electro-mechanical system so sooner or later it will fail and when it does, the surge protector should be able to prevent electrical failures elsewhere in the RV. If it's easy to include the genny, I would wire it in, that's how I did it as it's a cheap insurance policy.
The generator used in View/Navions is rather sophisticated inverter generator. It is already protected internally against all of the woes that can happen at the campground post. It doesn't hurt to hook it up but it isn't needed and it can complicate the installation.

I would not bother with a hardwired EMS in a View/Navion. A Progressive PT-30X portable works great and is easy to use.
__________________
Roger & Mary
2017 Winnebago Navion 24V (Sold)
2014 Tiffin Phaeton 36GH (Sold)
luvlabs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2020, 05:08 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
SuperGewl's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Ford Super Duty Owner
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Oregon
Posts: 2,551
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattpraz View Post
Many thanks for the insight for the installation and the nice job. I have my Progressive Surge protector and going to install it shortly. However I will install it on the shore power side because the whole basis of a surge protector is to protect from EXTERNAL issues, most of which are questionable connections and wiring at camp sites. In addition I plan on using 2 pairs of 3 pole twist lock plugs (https://is.gd/wRiGnl) to be able to bypass it should it get damaged. It will also allow me to store the cord elsewhere rather than roll it up into 8" loops to fit in that tight area. While not difficult to coil when it's 80 and sunny out, it's a real PIA at 45 degs and raining. I'll shoot some picture once it's done.

Best Regards
M Praz
Think about what you just said, " I plan on using 2 pairs of 3 pole twist lock plugs (https://is.gd/wRiGnl) to be able to bypass it should it get damaged" If it gets damaged, it will be when you are plugged in and it did it's job. So bypassing it does not make since because obviously there is a problem with the incoming power. So why you plug into it with NO protection?
At that time I would disconnect and run the generator and NOT hook back up again until get the Surge Protector replaced and they fix the incoming power. But that's just me
__________________
Retired Navy Submariner
2014 Itasca Sunstar 35F; 5 Star tuned; 2014 Jeep Cherokee TrailHawk
SuperGewl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2020, 07:17 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Tiffin Owners Club
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Las Cruces, NM
Posts: 3,893
A Progressive unit has a bypass switch built in. However, shortening the cord by adding a pair of 30 amp connectors is not a bad idea. Much easier than trying to stuff that cord back into that small compartment.
__________________
Roger & Mary
2017 Winnebago Navion 24V (Sold)
2014 Tiffin Phaeton 36GH (Sold)
luvlabs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2020, 09:10 AM   #11
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperGewl View Post
Think about what you just said, " I plan on using 2 pairs of 3 pole twist lock plugs (https://is.gd/wRiGnl) to be able to bypass it should it get damaged" If it gets damaged, it will be when you are plugged in and it did it's job. So bypassing it does not make since because obviously there is a problem with the incoming power. So why you plug into it with NO protection?
At that time I would disconnect and run the generator and NOT hook back up again until get the Surge Protector replaced and they fix the incoming power. But that's just me
You are absolutely right, however I have a properly wire GFCI outlet that I plug in at my home base while waiting on a replacement or repair. It also makes it easier to extract and service rather than having to rewire past it. It gives me options. While I would not plug back in to a problem campsite, I would evaluate and make a determination on the next location. Low voltage is the greatest issue on hot day in a tree less campsite with everyone running their AC. What you have provided is common sense, however it tends to be not so common. Thanks for your comments.
__________________
2020 Winnebago Navion D w/2016 Subaru Crosstrek Toad
Matt Praz
mattprazen@gmail.com
mattpraz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2020, 09:21 AM   #12
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvlabs View Post
A Progressive unit has a bypass switch built in. However, shortening the cord by adding a pair of 30 amp connectors is not a bad idea. Much easier than trying to stuff that cord back into that small compartment.
The bypass switch will work as long as the internal contactor is intact. After a lifetime servicing HVAC equipment, the contactor is a part that has failure rate greater than most of the other components. Caveat also is it cycle a lot more on an AC unit than it will here, but have you seen the wiring on these RV? It’s a concern of mine with the miles of exposed wires running around the RV. Yeah I’m that guy that seeks to be preventative rather than reactive.
__________________
2020 Winnebago Navion D w/2016 Subaru Crosstrek Toad
Matt Praz
mattprazen@gmail.com
mattpraz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2020, 09:33 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Washington State
Posts: 196
I use a Hughes Autoformer. Surge Protector and Voltage boost. Your electric equipment can fail with low AC voltage. Your Air Conditioner needs at least 110 vac The Autoformer boost the voltage 10% when low. Some hard wired Surge will shut off when low AC. On a hot day having a cool coach is important to me.
__________________
KH 2015 Winnebago View G
Coffie Drink is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
install, winnebago



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
2020 View 24D - can I avoid using propane? Juliana Winnebago Industries Owner's Forum 24 09-01-2019 07:52 AM
2020 view 24d craighouston Winnebago Industries Owner's Forum 1 08-13-2019 05:59 PM
Winnebago View :: 2018 Winnebago View 24D mdegrace iRV2 Owners Registry 0 06-30-2019 08:19 AM
P.I. EMS HW30C install - 2018 View 24D markap12013 Winnebago Industries Owner's Forum 20 04-03-2018 12:46 PM

» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:58 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.