Journey with Confidence RV GPS App RV Trip Planner RV LIFE Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Take a Speed Test Free 7 Day Trial ×
RV Trip Planning Discussions

Go Back   iRV2 Forums > THE OWNER'S CORNER FORUMS > Newmar Owner's Forum
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-30-2017, 05:55 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
tizzyfit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: seattle,wa USA
Posts: 1,025
How many fire extinguishers is enough?

My 2002 KSDP came with 1 5 pound fire extinguisher located inside the door by the passenger seat. I added additional extinguishers in the kitchen, bathroom, bedroom and front passenger side storage compartment, plus 1 in the towed vehicle. I know, if there was an on board fire, the objective is to get out safely, having an extinguisher within arms reach of anywhere in the motorhome gives me a sense of being able to get the dogs and me out should we experience a fire issue.
tizzyfit is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 01-30-2017, 06:08 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
D Lindy's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,636
I have the factory installed dry powder by the front door which is good enough for any/all inside fires IMO. Then in the outside compartment by the front door I have a LARGE 30lb dry powder extinguisher mainly for engine fires.
__________________
2012 Journey 40U (Our Incredible Journey)
2008 Dodge Dakota(TOAD) 2005 Honda Shadow in TOAD
AF-1 braking system
D Lindy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2017, 06:29 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Burlington, VT
Posts: 563
Mac the Fire Guy, seen at many RV shows and rallys recommends 4. One in front, kitchen, bedroom and one in either basement or toad.

In addition he recommends smoke detectors in the front and bedroom.
__________________
Stuart & Leslie
08 Holiday Ramb Navigator, 45 ft, Cummins ISX 600, 2014 Cherokee Limited, Cashmere. Roadmaster Sterling, SMI Airforceone. Full-timing since May 2014
S-n-L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2017, 06:58 AM   #4
Registered User
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Varies Depending on The Weather
Posts: 8,517
It is not so much as to how many you have BUT what the type of extinguishers you have now and how big. More is always better than not having enough to exit the coach safely but you want it to work when needed.

Dry chemical ones need monthly maintenance due to caking whereas AFFF extinguishers are always ready to serve providing that they have maintained their pressure.

You should always look at the gauge to make sure the cylinder hasn't lost pressure well BEFORE actually needing it to knock down a fire.

Dr4Film ----- Richard
Dr4Film is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2017, 07:20 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
rewillia's Avatar
 
Newmar Owners Club
Spartan Chassis
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Lake Charles (domicile)
Posts: 1,064
We have 4-total, 2-two inside the coach (1-front as OE installed next to/side of co-pilot seat and 1-one in the rear wardrobe closet) 1-SS-300-R4 dual head foam suppression system from Fire Fight Products installed in the engine bay and 1 small one in the rear of our Jeep SUV.

For me, its not about how many you have - its about being able to safely get to one if you need it. The engine foam system, well it will do its own part if needed.
__________________
Finding The Roads That Await Us
Rick & Lydia Williams
2018 Newmar Essex 4553
NKK Member 21619 / FMCA Member 465836
rewillia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2017, 08:02 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Texas Boomers Club
Oklahoma Boomers Club
Nor'easters Club
Spartan Chassis
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 533
My humble opinion is for an interior fire : exit immediately. For an exterior fire: don't stand too close for too long.
__________________
2016 Bay Star Sport downsize from 2001 MountainAire
Toad GMC Terrain, might leave it home on some trips.
hillboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2017, 08:15 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
wa8yxm's Avatar
 
Damon Owners Club
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 24,024
The answer to "How many is enough" depends on how you define "Enough"

I have 4.

But the answer is: One if it is big enough and where you need it when the fire breaks out.

So Why do I have 4 "Where you need it when the fire breaks out"
The more, the better the odds.

IN addition: I seriously recommend Mac the Fire Guy... He sells some good products, not too expensive, and far more powerful than their small size suggests.
__________________
Home is where I park it!
wa8yxm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2017, 09:42 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Luv2go's Avatar
 
Newmar Owners Club
Nor'easters Club
Appalachian Campers
Ford Super Duty Owner
Coastal Campers
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,462
At the 2009 iRV2 National Rally in Ohio we attended Mac the Fire Guy's seminar and both my wife Brenda and I had a chance to use one of his small AFFF-type fire extinguishers on a fire in his demonstration. We were convinced and bought a set of the AFFF-type fire extinguishers from Mac for the RV and toad. A couple of years later we bought some First Alert Tundra fire extinguishers for the house. These are also small AFFF fire extinguishers. We had one on each level of the house.

Fast forward to December 2 2016. We were at home, Brenda was upstairs putting our daughter to bed, I was working on our new-to-us Roadtrek and our son comes running out saying the smoke alarm is going off!

I ran in and Brenda is yelling that there's a fire in the library. Turns out one of the LiPO batteries from our son's RC truck had overheated and caught fire, catching the wood floor on fire. She had put it out with one of the Tundra fire extinguishers when the flames were about 2ft high, we figure about two minutes before we couldn't have done anything about it. Nobody was hurt. The fire department arrived in less than 5 minutes, they entered the house and said "you had a fire!" (we live in a small town and they thankfully average less than one fire call a week).

The extinguisher did it's job, Brenda was able to put it the flames quickly with about half the charge and I continued spraying the glowing embers of the battery while she called the fire department and our son found a metal pan to put it out in the yard with. We were able to minimize the actual fire damage to about a 1 square foot patch on the floor and rug, plus the batteries, charger, and some home theater system wiring.

Click image for larger version

Name:	LibraryFire.jpg
Views:	152
Size:	250.5 KB
ID:	150420

Since we didn't use a dry chemical extinguisher, the electronics and computers in the room just suffered smoke damage and we had no dry chemical dust to deal with, the AFFF foam is water soluble and non-toxic. Brenda used about half the extinguisher on the actual fire, I used it for at least 20-30 more seconds of spraying over the next few minutes to cool down the battery remains (they were orange-hot).

We are sold once again! We now have eight Tundra AFFF fire extinguishers spread around the house and gave more away as Christmas and Hanukkah presents.

We learned a lot during this experience and did things slightly differently the next time we had a fire scare (burning paper smell that turned out to be from our furnace after the ducts were cleaned).

We got the kids out of the house first, then called the fire department and started looking for the source. Neither we nor the fire department ever found it, we think the cleaning company somehow left lint or some paper shreds in the ductwork that made their way to the furnace heat exchanger.

To those who say flight is best, I would agree. We've placed some of our extinguishers in bedrooms and other places so they will help us escape if the fire is big enough. In this case, the fire was small enough and the smoke not bad enough that Brenda made the decision to fight it. She told me it helped tremendously that she had had the chance to use an extinguisher several times before, at fireman's days as well as at Mac's seminar.

We also have a fire extinguisher the kitchen, basement, garage and in any room where there is a lot of electronics, especially with lithium batteries such as cell phones, tablets, laptops, even my electric shaver.

We have three extinguishers in the Canyon Star, one in each car and three in the Roadtrek.

We may have gone overboard, but we believe it is cheap insurance.
__________________
Stewart, Brenda and kids
2008 Newmar Canyon Star 3410, now at a new home
2006 Roadtrek Versatile 210
Luv2go is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2017, 10:53 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,344
Just installed a foam 3 litter automatic fire extinguisher in the engine compartment on our Essex. Did install myself and will try later today post a couple pictures and some suggestion on install. With the numerous engine fires this would be a great safety upgrade on either a diesel or gas Newmar.
tom chelbana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2017, 11:20 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Monaco Owners Club
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: .
Posts: 789
A reminder of the different type of fire extinguishers.



Curt
05 Sig.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	What do the A B C ratings mean on Fire Extinguishers.jpg
Views:	85
Size:	272.8 KB
ID:	150449  
__________________
C&SL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2017, 11:35 AM   #11
"Formerly Diplomat Don"
 
Dutch Star Don's Avatar
 
Newmar Owners Club
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Moorpark, Ca.
Posts: 21,587
Keep in mind, Mac the Fire Guy is selling fear. I'm not being insensitive, but that's how he gets people to buy extinguishers. I was a Fire investigator for 16 years in Los Angeles County. The majority of fatal fires that I investigated involved murders and handicap people that could not escape the fire. Since I had an arson dog, I also deployed my dog at fire scenes being handled by 15 other investigators in my office. I can only think of one fire offhand that involved a young woman trapped in her bedroom by a living room fire. She had to jump from her second floor window and broke more bones than you could count, but she survived.

The trapped girl brings up a point with RV's. Typically, if a fire occurs in the kitchen or living area, you should take a quick shot at extinguishing, but don't be a hero and get out. The bigger concern is a fire in the main living area, while you're in the bedroom. In that case you should immediately exit the emergency window. I have the one extinguisher by the front door and a large extinguisher alongside our bed. That extinguisher is primarily intended to provide additional time for us to escape out the emergency exit, NOT fight the fire.

I have one out side in my most accessible storage bay (not one under a slide) and I have an automatic unit in the engine compartment. I didn't have one in the engine compartment of my previous DP, but this one runs much hotter with all the DEF equipment.

Don't be paralyzed by the possibility of a fire, just have a plan and be prepared to follow that plan. Keep in mind, fires can grow to out of control in a matter of a few minutes, even faster in an RV. It's not worth your life, so your plan should be more about escape than fire fighting.
__________________
Don & Mary
2019 Newmar Dutch Star 4018 (Freightliner)
2019 Ford Raptor
Dutch Star Don is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2017, 11:48 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
tizzyfit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: seattle,wa USA
Posts: 1,025
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutch Star Don View Post
Keep in mind, Mac the Fire Guy is selling fear. I'm not being insensitive, but that's how he gets people to buy extinguishers. I was a Fire investigator for 16 years in Los Angeles County. The majority of fatal fires that I investigated involved murders and handicap people that could not escape the fire. Since I had an arson dog, I also deployed my dog at fire scenes being handled by 15 other investigators in my office. I can only think of one fire offhand that involved a young woman trapped in her bedroom by a living room fire. She had to jump from her second floor window and broke more bones than you could count, but she survived.

The trapped girl brings up a point with RV's. Typically, if a fire occurs in the kitchen or living area, you should take a quick shot at extinguishing, but don't be a hero and get out. The bigger concern is a fire in the main living area, while you're in the bedroom. In that case you should immediately exit the emergency window. I have the one extinguisher by the front door and a large extinguisher alongside our bed. That extinguisher is primarily intended to provide additional time for us to escape out the emergency exit, NOT fight the fire.

I have one out side in my most accessible storage bay (not one under a slide) and I have an automatic unit in the engine compartment. I didn't have one in the engine compartment of my previous DP, but this one runs much hotter with all the DEF equipment.

Don't be paralyzed by the possibility of a fire, just have a plan and be prepared to follow that plan. Keep in mind, fires can grow to out of control in a matter of a few minutes, even faster in an RV. It's not worth your life, so your plan should be more about escape than fire fighting.
Don, I agree with your comments totally. That being said, at 20 something, exiting out the emergency window would be a no brainer. Now then at 73, I'm trying to visualize an exit procedure that would minimize bodily damage. It would seem exiting head first would be the quickest but you'd probably break your neck. Any workable solutions to this dilemma?
tizzyfit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2017, 12:38 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Old-Biscuit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 23,670
Having fought fires in oilfield, aboard NAVY ship and in Power Plant I respect FIRE

RVs are torches......

I have extinguishers in bedroom and kitchen area.
They are for ONE reason and ONE reason only.......to GET OUT

Once OUT.....RUN.
__________________
I took my Medication today. HAVE YOU?
Dodge 3500 w/Tractor Motor & NUWA 5vr
US NAVY---USS Decatur DDG-31
Old-Biscuit is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2017, 03:45 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Luv2go's Avatar
 
Newmar Owners Club
Nor'easters Club
Appalachian Campers
Ford Super Duty Owner
Coastal Campers
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,462
Quote:
Originally Posted by tizzyfit View Post
Don, I agree with your comments totally. That being said, at 20 something, exiting out the emergency window would be a no brainer. Now then at 73, I'm trying to visualize an exit procedure that would minimize bodily damage. It would seem exiting head first would be the quickest but you'd probably break your neck. Any workable solutions to this dilemma?
One thing I forgot to mention that Mac did stress in his seminar is to actually do a fire drill using that emergency exit. There were a bunch of us who put the picnic table on our sites under our exit windows so we could practice getting out. Not to say you'll have a picnic table under your exit window if there's a fire, but the idea is to practice without breaking bones.

If there is a fire you may break bones, but as Dutch Star Don mentioned, the young woman broke lots of bones when she jumped but she lived to tell about it. Everybody I've spoken to about fire preparedness, no matter whether it is a sticks and bricks, RV or workplace says to have a simple, concrete plan on what to do and practice it, and using the emergency exit is part of the practice.
__________________
Stewart, Brenda and kids
2008 Newmar Canyon Star 3410, now at a new home
2006 Roadtrek Versatile 210
Luv2go is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
fire



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
RV Fire Extinguishers...Do You Have Enough? Paramedic 1 Just Conversation 27 12-22-2015 10:09 AM
Fire Extinguishers - How Many and Where?? RESharp001 Class A Motorhome Discussions 11 05-13-2013 10:59 AM
And Speaking of Fire Extinguishers.... rockintom Excel Owner's Forum 54 07-24-2012 06:29 PM
Timely Reminder on Fire Extinguishers rockintom Excel Owner's Forum 11 05-26-2012 07:53 PM
Please check your fire extinguishers jjoe iRV2.com General Discussion 23 12-29-2007 04:32 AM

» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:36 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.