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Old 06-11-2008, 01:44 PM   #1
Hawkeye
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I have a 2007 Diplomat. The manual says to clean and re-pack wheel bearings every 30,000 miles or annually. I have 9000 miles on the rig after driving it for a year. It was built in January 2007, so about 1.5 years on current grease. Seems more like a miles issue to me. But, it may be a good idea to do now since it will be the first time. What do you do/recommend?
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Old 06-11-2008, 01:44 PM   #2
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I have a 2007 Diplomat. The manual says to clean and re-pack wheel bearings every 30,000 miles or annually. I have 9000 miles on the rig after driving it for a year. It was built in January 2007, so about 1.5 years on current grease. Seems more like a miles issue to me. But, it may be a good idea to do now since it will be the first time. What do you do/recommend?
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Old 06-11-2008, 02:37 PM   #3
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Hawkeye -- I have a 07 Camalot - I had hub oilers installed on mine at 15000 miles -- It don`t cost that much more than a re-pack, & much easier to service -- Other chassis mfg. use oiler`s -- Bill Willard
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Old 06-11-2008, 02:56 PM   #4
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Hawkeye
I also had oilers installed at 24,000 miles. The cost of repacking was going to be $150. The cost of the oilers was $300. So, in reality the oilers cost me $150 and I'll be even after the 2 year point.
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Old 06-12-2008, 09:46 AM   #5
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I think Bill Willard hit the nail on the head. Much easier to service. I've made a few calls to some of the local shops around here to change over to oilers and the vast majority of the shops in the East Texas Oil Patch recommend repacking instead of oilers. When asked why, they repond that the chief advantage of oilers is for heavy duty applications and offer little if any advantage for light to medium duty. They agree that they are easier to service but much more prone to seal leakage and brake damage. Most of the shops I talked to recommended synthetic semi-fluid wheel grease which has all the advantages (except service) of oilers without the leakage. I do a lot preventative maint so I'm probably going to go with oilers so the chance of oil leaking on to the brakes will slight. The cost to install oilers is not really a factor, I really dislike hanging around a nasty truck service facility for hours.

mark
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Old 06-12-2008, 12:12 PM   #6
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Hi Guy's

Excuse my ignorance - i don't know what "hub oilers" are.

Please explain what they are and why we need them.

Thanks.


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Old 06-12-2008, 01:10 PM   #7
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Hub oilers create a fully wet environment for the front wheel bearings. Additionally, they typically have a transparent cover to allow monitoring of the oil level in the bearing cavity and the ability to change the oil. Therefore, the servicing of the bearings is greatly simplified and allows the coach owner to perform the service. Traditional grease packed front wheel bearings require the jacking up of the vehicle, removing the wheel and hub assembly, cleaning the bearings and hub assembly, repacking the bearing ... you get the drift. Not an easy job and also very messy. Way back, when I had more time than money I repacked the wheel bearings but don't think I would attempt it on a MH.
They are not a requirement. It just makes a messy job easier and can save money in that you can perform the periodic oil change yourself. The downside is if you lose a wheel bearing seal and don't catch it soon enough you can soak the brakes with oil. Don't know if that happens often enough to be an issue though. Maybe with vehicles that see extreme service and many miles a year.

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Old 06-12-2008, 01:19 PM   #8
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Sixpack98

Thank you for the explanation

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Old 06-15-2013, 08:44 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sixpack98 View Post
I think Bill Willard hit the nail on the head. Much easier to service. I've made a few calls to some of the local shops around here to change over to oilers and the vast majority of the shops in the East Texas Oil Patch recommend repacking instead of oilers. When asked why, they repond that the chief advantage of oilers is for heavy duty applications and offer little if any advantage for light to medium duty. They agree that they are easier to service but much more prone to seal leakage and brake damage. Most of the shops I talked to recommended synthetic semi-fluid wheel grease which has all the advantages (except service) of oilers without the leakage. I do a lot preventative maint so I'm probably going to go with oilers so the chance of oil leaking on to the brakes will slight. The cost to install oilers is not really a factor, I really dislike hanging around a nasty truck service facility for hours.

mark
I read your post on wheel bearings. We are the new owners of a 1999 HR Endeavor. I have read about oil in front wheel bearings. Can you tell me how to check them or lead me to a post that would give me the info. This our first diesel and I know I have a lot to learn.

Joe and Lynn
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Old 06-15-2013, 09:51 AM   #10
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We need to address our wheel bearings this year. Just wondering *where* you go to get this done? The few places I asked didn't do it. Any specific recommendations in Eugene or Grants Pass OR?
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Old 06-15-2013, 10:19 AM   #11
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We need to address our wheel bearings this year. Just wondering *where* you go to get this done? The few places I asked didn't do it. Any specific recommendations in Eugene or Grants Pass OR?
So do we. We would welcome recommendations from the Orlando/Clerment FL. area.
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Old 06-15-2013, 10:42 AM   #12
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When I need chassis maintenance done, I go to the local Kenworth shop. It may cost a little more, they tend to know more about taking care if larger vehicle.
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Old 06-15-2013, 11:00 AM   #13
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Everything you ever wanted to know about front wheel bearings. I always use a dial indicator to adjust them. I never let anyone do it by feel.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Dana Front Axle Manual AXSM-0038.pdf (1.87 MB, 88 views)
File Type: pdf Dana Front Axle Parts Breakdown AXIP-0075.pdf (771.2 KB, 64 views)
File Type: pdf Timken Bearing Adjustment Vol1No5.pdf (59.4 KB, 91 views)
File Type: pdf Timken Dial Indicator Vol1No7.pdf (69.6 KB, 72 views)
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Old 06-15-2013, 11:02 AM   #14
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And one more that explains why you have to use a dial indicator.
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File Type: pdf Vol1 Iss5AdjWheelBrngSystems.pdf (210.6 KB, 82 views)
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