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Old 12-31-2019, 12:04 PM   #1
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Frustrating!!

Just got our 2018 isl9 out of storage, started and got a 1209 2 1 error message. I can clear it with my scanD but it comes right back. It was running great prior to putting it in storage. Of course we’re leaving for Florida next Tuesday and this happens. We got rid of our last MH because I got tired of the repetitive check engine lights and breakdowns, and of course the towing as a result. Any suggestions would be appreciated
Happy New Year
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Old 12-31-2019, 12:34 PM   #2
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Most likely cause of code - Replace the exhaust gas pressure sensor - about $120. It's located above the front section of the exhaust manifold and is plumbed into the exhaust manifold. Make sure the Exhaust pressure tube is not plugged as well that is located below the sensor and is plumbed into the manifold. (see pic below)
(Pic from justanswer.com)
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Old 12-31-2019, 10:43 PM   #3
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Bobby
Thanks so much for the reply and diagram, I’ll check it out tomorrow

Happy New Year!!!
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Old 01-21-2020, 01:18 PM   #4
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Late reply

Sorry I just realized that I never updated the resolution to our check engine lite...
Long story short took it to Cummins on the northwest side of Columbus and a replacement of the turbo and associated parts was required. ~8000 miles on the unit. As I stated we traded our last coach due to excessive breakdown problems and now this after so few miles. If there is a positive to the situation everything was covered under warranty. The bad part to me is that Cummins installs “rebuilt” parts on any repair but warrants them as if new and still falls under our 5 year engine warranty.
Such is life...
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Old 01-21-2020, 02:18 PM   #5
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Sorry I just realized that I never updated the resolution to our check engine lite...
Long story short took it to Cummins on the northwest side of Columbus and a replacement of the turbo and associated parts was required. ~8000 miles on the unit. As I stated we traded our last coach due to excessive breakdown problems and now this after so few miles. If there is a positive to the situation everything was covered under warranty. The bad part to me is that Cummins installs “rebuilt” parts on any repair but warrants them as if new and still falls under our 5 year engine warranty.
Such is life...
Funny how a turbo can wear out in storage.
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Old 01-21-2020, 02:22 PM   #6
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Ouch.

Thanks for coming back to fill in the gap.

Sometimes I just take it for granted that a sensor has failed and ignore that maybe it hasn't failed and is truly sensing doom.
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Old 01-21-2020, 03:27 PM   #7
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Funny how a turbo can wear out in storage.
My best guess is nothing is worn out but the variable vanes in the turbo are stuck or sticking partially. 1 degree out of specs and the code will set.

This is unfortunately more and more common with modern turbodiesels and more frequent on engines that aren't run hard nor pushed every once in awhile.

Long term storage...I recommend someone be able to run the vehicle every 2 months or so if at all possible.
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Old 01-21-2020, 04:01 PM   #8
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Long term storage...I recommend someone be able to run the vehicle every 2 months or so if at all possible.
I don't want to start the debate about not starting a diesel unless you are going to run it under load thus getting everything up to operating temperature.

But...years ago a very trusted diesel mechanic explained to me the problems with allowing the same valves, pistons, turbos, etc to be exposed to the outside elements via the exhaust pipe and intake manifold. Some of these problems are sticking parts, corrosion and allowing paths for moisture to enter the engine.

I have followed his advice since. Once a week, or month or as often as I can... within reason...I start my diesel engines, listen for the sound to change as the internal parts get oil...watch the oil pressure come up...and then turn it off. It takes about 15-20 seconds and I am done. Everything on the inside is re arranged and new pieces and parts are exposed to the elements all covered in a fresh coat of oil.
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Old 01-22-2020, 01:28 PM   #9
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I don't want to start the debate about not starting a diesel unless you are going to run it under load thus getting everything up to operating temperature.

But...years ago a very trusted diesel mechanic explained to me the problems with allowing the same valves, pistons, turbos, etc to be exposed to the outside elements via the exhaust pipe and intake manifold. Some of these problems are sticking parts, corrosion and allowing paths for moisture to enter the engine.

I have followed his advice since. Once a week, or month or as often as I can... within reason...I start my diesel engines, listen for the sound to change as the internal parts get oil...watch the oil pressure come up...and then turn it off. It takes about 15-20 seconds and I am done. Everything on the inside is re arranged and new pieces and parts are exposed to the elements all covered in a fresh coat of oil.
I wouldn't do that to a diesel engine even if someone handed me a hundred dollar bill each time.
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Old 01-22-2020, 01:34 PM   #10
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I wouldn't do that to a diesel engine even if someone handed me a hundred dollar bill each time.
Agree, all that does is wear out the starter and battery.
Startup of any engine is when the most wear happens, due to lack of oil.

There is absolutely no benefit.
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Old 01-23-2020, 04:34 PM   #11
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My gut is telling me that doing that instantly coats the upper cylinder walls, valve train and turbo veins with condensation without ever bringing those components up to a high enough temperature where the condensation can burn off. When the engine shuts down, it’s wet. The engine is cold at startup, so the exhaust gasses cool quickly and condense.

I’d do it for $100 a pop if it was someone else’s engine. That’s about it.

If you must start up during the off season, engaging the exhaust brake at fast idle to bring egt up will help, but you still have to run the engine for a while to bring everything up to operating temp...

Just my $.02

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Old 01-23-2020, 07:23 PM   #12
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I don't want to start the debate about not starting a diesel unless you are going to run it under load thus getting everything up to operating temperature.

But...years ago a very trusted diesel mechanic explained to me the problems with allowing the same valves, pistons, turbos, etc to be exposed to the outside elements via the exhaust pipe and intake manifold. Some of these problems are sticking parts, corrosion and allowing paths for moisture to enter the engine.

I have followed his advice since. Once a week, or month or as often as I can... within reason...I start my diesel engines, listen for the sound to change as the internal parts get oil...watch the oil pressure come up...and then turn it off. It takes about 15-20 seconds and I am done. Everything on the inside is re arranged and new pieces and parts are exposed to the elements all covered in a fresh coat of oil.
I wouldn't trust that "diesel mechanic" anymore.
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Old 01-26-2020, 11:55 AM   #13
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One thing that I am noticing in all the postings I see relating to diesels and turbo diesels in particular, is that no one mentions cool down. When I started trucking it was the holy grail, you cool down the engine at idle for at least 3 minutes before shut down. 5 or more is even better. Several reasons for this. It allows the turbo to cool and slow down. Shut off a hot turbo and you will "coke" the oil in its bearings. Uneven cooling also leads to cracks in the vanes and ingestion.
Exhaust manifolds can reach red heat when running hard so let 'er cool before turning that key off. Saves exhaust leaks, manifold replacements, turbo ditto.

The above applies to gas engines as well. So often I have seen a rv pull into a rest area, gas station etc and immediately shut down. A chat later often confirms that the owner has had multiple exhaust leaks etc.

Just my thoughts. Maybe it is no longer required?
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Old 01-26-2020, 12:18 PM   #14
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One thing that I am noticing in all the postings I see relating to diesels and turbo diesels in particular, is that no one mentions cool down. When I started trucking it was the holy grail, you cool down the engine at idle for at least 3 minutes before shut down. 5 or more is even better. Several reasons for this. It allows the turbo to cool and slow down. Shut off a hot turbo and you will "coke" the oil in its bearings. Uneven cooling also leads to cracks in the vanes and ingestion.
Exhaust manifolds can reach red heat when running hard so let 'er cool before turning that key off. Saves exhaust leaks, manifold replacements, turbo ditto.

The above applies to gas engines as well. So often I have seen a rv pull into a rest area, gas station etc and immediately shut down. A chat later often confirms that the owner has had multiple exhaust leaks etc.

Just my thoughts. Maybe it is no longer required?
I definitely recommend a cooldown, idling period of at least 30 seconds. If it was pushed hard, say, pulling a heavy trailer up a mountain pass a few minutes, 2-3, idling will circulate enough cooler oil to get turbo temps down and prevent the oil passages trapped oil boiling and coking up, thus eventually choking oil supply or return pipes to the turbo.

On some smaller passenger vehicle gas turbos there are electric pumps set up for after-run cooling. Some well set-up turbos have natural coolant circulation even with engine abruptly shut off, older SAABs come to mind. I still recommend an idle period of at least 30 seconds for the turbo to wind down with oil pressure.

On light and medium duty diesel turbos I doubt they have any oil or coolant after-run setup but I'm not that intimate with them anymore at my shop.

I would not recommend a very short start and run time of 30 seconds a week as one poster mentioned. That's a recipe for medium term issues that can be costly. Oil will stick to components for a pretty long time. What one wants is remaining at operating temperature for at least 10-15 minutes but ideally 30 minuutes or more.
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