Free 7 Day Trial RV GPS App RV Trip Planner Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Free 7 Day Trial ×
RV Trip Planning Discussions

Go Back   iRV2 Forums > THE CHASSIS CLUB FORUMS > Workhorse and Chevrolet Chassis Motorhome Forum
Click Here to Login
Join iRV2 Today

Mission Statement: Supporting thoughtful exchange of knowledge, values and experience among RV enthusiasts.
Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on iRV2
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-01-2021, 07:21 PM   #1
Member
 
rlcpe's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 65
Sumo or new shocks

Which reduces the jolting more at stiff bumps on a W22 Chassis, Sumo Springs or new Bilstein or Koni shocks?
rlcpe is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 RV Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

iRV2.com RV Community - Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you'll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 08-01-2021, 07:33 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
edgray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Madison, MS
Posts: 9,721
I think Sumo “springs” are likely to provide more relief from jarring. Technically, shock absorbers is a misnomer because their primary job is to reduce the frequency of rebounds, and not absorbing “shocks” from road defects. Worn out shocks allow the bouncing up and down to continue longer than do new ones.
edgray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2021, 08:33 PM   #3
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 1,042
When I installed the sumos on our Ford chassis, I definitely noticed less jarring going over things like expansion joints and less side to side sway. I also gained about an inch of ride height.

When installed the Koni FSD’s I immediately noticed a more compliant ride in every respect. Shocks won’t help with things like sway, but the ride over every road surface was dramatically improved.
Massparanoia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2021, 03:36 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
yeloduster's Avatar
 
Workhorse Chassis Owner
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 1,027
If you don't know the age or condition of the shock absorbers you should change them before doing any other suspension work. Shock absorbers are maintenance items. Gadgets to improve ride and handling cannot compensate for worn shocks.

I put Bilstein shocks on mine and I am satisfied with them. Other prefer Koni shocks. Pick your poison but do the shocks first then decide if you need anything else.
__________________
2003 34' Georgetown on W20 Workhorse Chassis. UltraRV power mods. Front Sumo Springs, Rear P32 Sumo Springs, UltraRV Track Bar.
1998 Jeep Toad.
yeloduster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2021, 06:46 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
vettenuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 5,171
I put Sumos on the front, after switching out the original Bilsteins with Konis. The ride difference with the Konis was immediate and I felt it softened the ride. Not sure the Sumos improved the ride that much, but they were easy to install and relatively inexpensive so I gave them a try.

However, neither will remove the jarring input from a bridge abutment.
__________________
2015 Tiffin Phaeton 40QBH
2018 Chevrolet Colorado Toad
Roadmaster Tow Setup
vettenuts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2021, 08:10 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
rffowler55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: North Georgia Mountains
Posts: 318
We have the Sumo's on our front end and as stated earlier they help a lot with the swaying from side to side but normally only come into play on a jarring incident that exceeds the shocks ability to absorb (could be due to a shock that is worn out). We replaced our Bilstein's recently with new Bilstein's and the responsiveness of the new shocks were improved over the old shocks that had over 50,000 miles of abuse. The biggest impact on our jarring was not new shock or Sumo's but was reducing our tire pressure closer to the minimum PSI for our axle weights plus 5 pounds for my own piece of mind (prefer a firm sidewall to reduce tire overheating).
__________________
2007 Newmar Baystar; 3201; miniature schnauzers and labradoodle. SumoSprings Front; Safe-T-Plus;2016 Fiat 500; Roadmaster Falcon 2;Demco SBS DUO Braking System;TST 507;Bilstein shocks; Garmin RV 785
rffowler55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2021, 10:36 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
CamJam1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: Arizona
Posts: 1,331
I guess that would depend on how bad your old shocks are. If they're leaking they need ti be replaced. I replaced my original shocks with Bilsteins. Can't say I noticed much difference, perhaps a little less sway, but my original shocks only had 14k miles on them (but were 15 years old) and may have been perfectly fine. The Sumos did soften the bridge transitions for me.
__________________
2004 National Dolphin LX 6320, W-22, 8.1, Allison 1000, Front/rear "Trac" Bars & Anti-sway Bars, Sumo Springs, Roadmaster Reflex Steering Stabilizer, 2005 PT Cruiser Toad
CamJam1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2021, 10:44 AM   #8
Member
 
rlcpe's Avatar
 
Winnebago Owners Club
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 65
Thanks all. We have 55,000 miles on what I believe are the original shocks. I'll do the shocks first and the see if the sumos are needed.
rlcpe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2021, 08:37 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Beverslee Hills, Calif
Posts: 158
Actually not so, 'good shocks' can have diff valving for compression (hits) vs rebound but ALL shocks 'dampen' the action of the springing in BOTH directions.

Some 'good' shocks have both preload and some can have pre-load adjusted as well as how hard or easy the 'valves' will open to allow more oil/fluid inside to flow.

** a 'closed' valve does not allow oil/fluid to flow and causes 'harshness' or restricted movement of suspension - thus valving is the most important aspect of the typ simple mh shock, open valve obviously allows fluid flow but also can have multiple orifices for fluid to flow and valving can open them in a progressive manner - so valving can be fairly complex just in itself.

They can also have rebound tuning as well, but a PURPOSE designed shock will be 'tuned' in both compression and rebound for the 'loads & speed' of compression and rebound of the mechanical parts of suspension.

So a 'good' tuned shock both 'smooths' compression AND rebound and 'should' make for a better and smoother ride - but essentially they are to absorb the harshness of an uncompensated mechanical spring which has ZERO dampening generally.

Check out either racing shocks or just off shelf off road motorcycles for the sophistication that shocks can have, it is a science all in itself !

PLUS, you CAN buy shocks with aux springs so they can have an even greater effect on suspension tuning, but simple Bilstein and Kona shocks, it is up to the 'engineering' (if any) of the engineers/tuners, but do not expect too much and NO tuning at all.

Just to give info, shocks from OTHER uses (from a catalog) can be used on mh, but you must know the total max and min lengths of travel, as well as springing amounts & weight of vehicle involved - just so to NOT destroy or hurt things if trying for some tunable shocks - non trivial stuff - but could be very rewarding - and we have just been talking about simple UP&DOWN suspension movements, no dynamics of side-to-side, etc !!
Quote:
Originally Posted by edgray View Post
I think Sumo “springs” are likely to provide more relief from jarring. Technically, shock absorbers is a misnomer because their primary job is to reduce the frequency of rebounds, and not absorbing “shocks” from road defects. Worn out shocks allow the bouncing up and down to continue longer than do new ones.
__________________
2007 WhineyBagels W24 54k mi Allison 2100mh
SmilingSam is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
shocks



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need help in finding Koni shocks and Sumo springs in Alberta, Canada PB from AB Sprinter Chassis Forum 8 07-01-2019 06:45 PM
Sumo springs and Koni shocks MoCoTom Workhorse and Chevrolet Chassis Motorhome Forum 66 03-21-2019 12:42 PM
Sumo shocks aznancy Class A Motorhome Discussions 6 07-29-2016 04:55 PM
Anti-sway bar(s) and/or Sumo shocks? JeffAZ Workhorse and Chevrolet Chassis Motorhome Forum 13 09-26-2015 06:29 PM
Koni FSD Shocks and Sumo Springs on Class A johnp77777 MH-General Discussions & Problems 1 10-14-2012 12:43 AM

» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.