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Old 09-30-2020, 06:47 PM   #1
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2 Water Pressure Regulators?....

Hi All:

I like redundancy, 1 is none, 2 is 1 AND 3 IS BETTER.

Having said that, has anyone ran 2 water pressure regulators at the same time?....

I want to use a simple regulator at the spigot and another one at the coach fill port, does anyone see a problem doing this?, has anyone ever done it?....

Please share your thoughts and experiences if any.

Thank You.
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Old 09-30-2020, 06:55 PM   #2
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2nd water pressure regulator will not do anything unless 1st reg FAILS
OR if 2nd reg is set to control lower pressure

But 2 is not really worthwhile or beneficial
(2 LP regulators don't work either...)

Spend your monies on a good quality adjustable water pressure regulator for Spigot, a good 'Y' for 2 hoses (1 potable and 1 General service) plus good filter(s) on potable hose
*Watts Brand
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Old 09-30-2020, 08:16 PM   #3
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Double redundancy isnít the answer and quite often counterproductive. Donít overthink this. Go with Old Biscuitís thoughts.
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Old 09-30-2020, 08:31 PM   #4
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I know, it's water and not electricity.

I know, I'm neither a plumber nor an electrician.

I also know that two GFCI's in a circuit don't "play well together".

I've never considered multiple pressure regulators...and...I don't think I'll change my mind.

But, it's your RV; your choice.

Take care,
Stu
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Old 09-30-2020, 09:31 PM   #5
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Cheap regulators significantly reduce flow. As others have suggested, I would, and did, opt for a single high quality adjustable regulator to place at the spigot. Pressure regulators aren't high failure rate items and in most instances failure is not catastrophic.
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Old 09-30-2020, 10:17 PM   #6
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Why would you want to double up on pressure regulators?
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Old 09-30-2020, 10:41 PM   #7
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I have used a single Watts 263A pressure regulator at the inlet to the water filters. It's set to around 55 to 60 psi. It has worked well, until now.

One place we stay has a lot of minerals in the water. So, it's time to add a water softener. The same place can have water pressure at the spigot of 100 psi. At that pressure, you run the risk of blowing up the components upstream of the current regulator, including the water softener.

So, the regulator now needs to move to the spigot, and has to be set at a higher pressure, because there's more hoo-hah to create pressure drops.

Or, I could keep the regulator I have, where it is, and add a second one at the spigot, set to a higher pressure (say, 75 psi), whatever is "safe" for the hoses, softener, etc.

Unhappily, the minerals will foul the spigot-attached regulator and cause it to stop working reliably, at some point, after which I'll have to open it up and clean it out. It happens to the current regulator.

Floating around in the background of "things to be considered" is whether or not we use the coach's water tank and water pump to supply water at all times inside the coach. This is the operating mode "Old-Biscuit" recommends, for several reasons. If we do, then a pressure regulator merely prevents the parts involved in filling the tank from blowing up. On the other hand, if we use the spigot to supply the water inside the coach, then the pressure regulator is an active part of making sure the coach water pressure is adequate- and that means more "messing around" with the regulator or regulators. On this point I'm almost in the place where I'm willing to run off the tank all the time. I say "almost" for two reasons: 1) We have a washer-dryer, and I'd rather not run that off the tank (although I can't say why), and 2) I'm not a fan of hearing the pump run during the nighttime bathroom trips.

In any case, I can see an argument for a two-regulator design, if you don't run off the tank and pump.
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Old 09-30-2020, 10:58 PM   #8
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I have a Watts residential water pressure regulator just inside of the city water connection. It's all brass from the connection point to the regulator and I replaced the plastic OEM connection with a metal unit. Then I use a higher grade of drinking quality hose that's rated at 300 PSI. We've never had any issues even at parks with very high pressure, 110 PSI in one case. If the source water is poor quality I'll put an additional inline filter outside the RV. I already have a whole house style water filter built in just inside of the regulator.

As other have said the cheap "water pressure regulators" are really flow reduces that happen to reduce pressure. A true water regulator does not reduce the flow.
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Old 09-30-2020, 11:06 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1v3fr33ord1 View Post
I have used a single Watts 263A pressure regulator at the inlet to the water filters. It's set to around 55 to 60 psi. It has worked well, until now.

One place we stay has a lot of minerals in the water. So, it's time to add a water softener. The same place can have water pressure at the spigot of 100 psi. At that pressure, you run the risk of blowing up the components upstream of the current regulator, including the water softener.

So, the regulator now needs to move to the spigot, and has to be set at a higher pressure, because there's more hoo-hah to create pressure drops.

Or, I could keep the regulator I have, where it is, and add a second one at the spigot, set to a higher pressure (say, 75 psi), whatever is "safe" for the hoses, softener, etc.

Unhappily, the minerals will foul the spigot-attached regulator and cause it to stop working reliably, at some point, after which I'll have to open it up and clean it out. It happens to the current regulator.

Floating around in the background of "things to be considered" is whether or not we use the coach's water tank and water pump to supply water at all times inside the coach. This is the operating mode "Old-Biscuit" recommends, for several reasons. If we do, then a pressure regulator merely prevents the parts involved in filling the tank from blowing up. On the other hand, if we use the spigot to supply the water inside the coach, then the pressure regulator is an active part of making sure the coach water pressure is adequate- and that means more "messing around" with the regulator or regulators. On this point I'm almost in the place where I'm willing to run off the tank all the time. I say "almost" for two reasons: 1) We have a washer-dryer, and I'd rather not run that off the tank (although I can't say why), and 2) I'm not a fan of hearing the pump run during the nighttime bathroom trips.

In any case, I can see an argument for a two-regulator design, if you don't run off the tank and pump.
Install an accumulator tank and turn pump off at bedtime.
Accumulator will provide enough system pressure for a quiet flush of toilet
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Old 10-01-2020, 09:53 AM   #10
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Quote:
I also know that two GFCI's in a circuit don't "play well together".

Yet another internet myth.
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Old 10-01-2020, 09:57 AM   #11
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Quote:
I like redundancy, 1 is none, 2 is 1 AND 3 IS BETTER.

Having said that, has anyone ran 2 water pressure regulators at the same time?....

Redundancy makes sense when the risk of failure is high or the result of a failure catastrophic, but [in my opinion] neither of those applies here. But if you are that worried about excessive water pressure in your RV, go for it. Do use quality regulators with high flow rates, though.
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Old 10-01-2020, 08:21 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzzo View Post
Hi All:

I like redundancy, 1 is none, 2 is 1 AND 3 IS BETTER.

Having said that, has anyone ran 2 water pressure regulators at the same time?....

I want to use a simple regulator at the spigot and another one at the coach fill port, does anyone see a problem doing this?, has anyone ever done it?....

Please share your thoughts and experiences if any.

Thank You.

My 2 cents....

I'm OCD about redundancy. I fished boats out to 100 miles from the dock, and a few multi day trips a year. I had three VHF radios and a SSB radio... pretty sure I could have called for help if needed..

Many electronics, I required to be stand alone, not share a controller or screen. I had separate GPS/plotter, Depthfinder, Radar, and 2nd GPS .. each their own self contained unit.. I even had a battery backup unit for emergency electronics should my battery banks become submerged and fail...

Many things, I just kept spare parts for... engine raw water pump impellers, freshwater pump, bait pump, toilet pump parts, etc

In the case of an RV water regulator... I don't see the need to have two installed at the same time.. If anything, keep a new spare in your parts bin. Then if the old one fails, you're just minutes and a little effort away from "like new" shore water performance...

If you're worried about one failing and the other protecting the coach water lines... You'll know if the pressure regulator fails, and pressure increases, when you are onboard and use any water.. You can then effect repairs...

Anytime you leave the coach site, shut of the shore water spigot and your coach is protected against regulator failure when you are away...

Good luck with your decision....
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