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Old 04-29-2021, 07:26 PM   #1
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Assistance needed for an amateur

Hello,

I've been following on here for quite a while, but now I've decided to post. I know that many people on here see RV'ing as so much more than a "toy" or a pastime, it's a philosophy, a lifestyle. I share that belief. I've considered renting an apartment before, but then I discovered motorhomes. The unconventional aspects of living off the grid, in my opinion, are endearing. I personally also love older class A coaches; there's actually space to reside in. I admit I know very little about the practicalities of RV'ing.

I am a 22 year old college student with a credit rating of 700. I am about $2200 in debt. I have a very slim credit history, but a good score. I project my job will yield me roughly $13.50 an hour. Is it realistic for me (in a few months) to rent an older coach, maybe 1999-2000-2001, long term? Can I get approved? I love the living space of the class A's, and can afford the rent.
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Old 04-29-2021, 08:37 PM   #2
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Welcome.

I think it's great that you're looking into RVing as a lifestyle. But you're facing several obstacles at this early stage in your endeavor.

Most of your issues will stem from your age, income and insurability. Renting an RV which moves, may be financially strapping at $13.50/hr. Renting an RV which doesn't move without a truck may be more financially feasible....but insurance will not be your friend.

Don't know where you live or where your job will be, but those are also factors in living "off the grid". If you're going to be camp advisor in Idaho, there may be options for you. If you're in NYC or SF, it may be impossible.

I haven't looked hard, but renting a motorhome in the 1999-2001 age group isn't done often or everywhere. And if you've priced the current age group of RVs for rent, you know your entire check would go to pay the rent.

You asked 2 questions. In my opinion, I doubt you'll find that RV you're looking for to rent. Also in my opinion, I doubt you'll get approved.

Having said that, there may be a situation out there for you. But you're going to have look long and hard to find it.

Have you thought about a travel trailer and a nice truck?

Best of luck,
Jim
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Old 04-29-2021, 08:43 PM   #3
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I am unaware of anyone that rents motorized coaches long term. Now if you are looking for a park model pull behind or 5th wheel maybe. Your costs will not be any less than renting a mobile home in a trailer park or a small house however. Short term rentals of class a coaches can be 1000-2000 dollars a week. You could purchase an older coach but most of those are either going to be in the 40-50 thousand dollar range or will be in need of extensive repairs and have no option to finance. Living in an RV full time strictly for the purpose of saving money is not really viable.

I am doing it but my coach and toad is paid for. I invested about $85,000 for the coach, rehab, and repair to get it travel ready, and a home base pad on my son's property to return to rent free (I mow his 3 acres with my zero turn when I'm there). I stay there 2 weeks and pay $364 a month for 2 weeks at the local COE. I am working full time and my health insurance is paid. My monthly budget is around $2500.00 but I might could get by on $2000.00 if I really made an effort. Were I traveling, paying fuel, and paying a full months camp fees costs would go up to $3500 monthly and that doesn't include health insurance. I also do all my own maintenance. The only reason I am doing it is to travel when I retire at the end of the year. there are better ways to save money.
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Old 04-29-2021, 08:45 PM   #4
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There is a lot to learn about living in an RV, as their systems are quite different from those in a house. Major differences are things like the waste tanks that all waste water goes into until you empty them into the sewer connections, the appliances and lights operate on 12V power from batteries or a converter, and numerous other differences. I don't know of any RV rental company that has anything that is more than a couple of years old so you would have to buy the RV. Older RVs are reasonably priced but they can require a lot of maintenance that gets very expensive unless you do the work yourself. I do encourage you to keep on investigating as there may well be a good answer for what you want to do, but it will take some planning so keep learning.

Welcome to the RV forums!
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Old 04-29-2021, 09:59 PM   #5
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Even if you got an RV for free, they cost money sitting or moving. Despite the interior appointments that may appear luxurious it amounts to a poorly insulated and not very durable structure. There's a reason RV'ers follow the weather - much below freezing is not a place you want to be in an RV. You're responsible for the management of all your utilities, so that means securing water, fuel and power either purchased or rented.

I think under the right circumstances an RV might work out as a short term accommodation, say if you found the right one and you had arrangements to stay with friends or family on their property. But if you have to move around and pay at a park with hookups it wouldn't be cost effective. "Free" parking is only as free as far as you're willing to drive and resupply your water and fuels. A tank of gas for my class A is about $250, a tank of propane about $50. Alone, I could probably make it two weeks on the water I carry.

In the grand scheme of things you would be money ahead to rent an apartment. Not that it would be impossible to make the RV scenario work, but it would take a very specific set of conditions like an unbelievable deal on an RV, a free place to park it and temperate weather. RV living is not as economical as it might appear. A trailer would be a lot cheaper but suffer the same issues of fair weather and utilities. There ain't no free lunch.

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Old 04-29-2021, 10:46 PM   #6
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Not to be negative but at $13.50 per hour your income will be about $27,000 a year, or $2,250 per month. You can spend about a third of that on housing which puts you in the neighborhood of $750 per month in housing expenses. I'm assuming you don't have a lot of money in the bank. I realize this may be wrong. The reason I bring this up is that in order to finance an RV you will likely have to have 20-25% as a down payment. As far as your particular situation goes you will need to have a combined rig payment and lot rental of $750 per month or less. I think this is going to be a tough thing to find, but you may be able to do it. One thing you may be able to find is a situation where you can park the rig for free in exchange for being on site for security reasons. Good luck.
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Old 04-30-2021, 08:58 AM   #7
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Hi ! Welcome to IRV2! We're sure glad you joined us!

I doubt that you will be able to find an older coach like that to rent, unless it's from an individual owner. I can't add anything else to what others have said. Sure hope it works out for you!

Good luck, happy trails, and God bless!
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Old 04-30-2021, 03:53 PM   #8
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If you were my son (or daughter), I'd tell you to get a cheap apartment and finish college. Forget the RV for now. Unless you have an unusual situation or opportunity, it's not going to be cheaper.

I don't know what your major in college is, but I would expect you can make more than $13.50/hour with a degree.
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Old 05-01-2021, 04:57 AM   #9
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Yeah. When I turned 30 it was like, do I get a house or a boat? I settled on the boat, because you can live on a boat but it takes a heck of a tail wind to get a house underway. My broker kinda shook his head. "It's the most expensive way in the world to live at the poverty level," he said. Kept showing me boats anyway.

Much the same applies to RV's but, you know.

My advice: don't even think about a class A. You wind up with too many vehicles to maintain, insure, and move around.

If you want to try before you buy, you may be able to find a fifth wheel to rent in a trailer park. Figure $500/mo plus power for the lot rental and whatever in addition to rent the trailer.

Or you can dive on in.

It's WAY easier to finance a vehicle than an RV, which is considered by the bank to be "a toy" even if you live in it. You could look for a truck camper, possibly get the whole thing as a vehicle loan. Or, trade in your car for a full size pickup and see what kind of travel trailer or fifth wheel you can afford. Be mindful of towing capacity, plan before you buy.

Keep your eye on the Florida market, when people age out of the snowbirding business sometimes they will let a fifth wheel go for next to nothing, if you're a fast talker, and willing to go get it

I mention fifth wheels, even though they are bigger, harder to tow and more expensive than travel trailers. But, nice to live on and like I said, sometimes people give em away at the end

Whatever you get yourself into, make sure you can get back out again. Don't get upside down. Easier said than done in the RV business.
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Old 05-01-2021, 05:23 AM   #10
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Depending on where you live there are long term camp grounds that cater more to what your looking to do, or seasonal construction workings for long outages/shutdowns at big plants. The actual initial trailer purchase is on you . An older well made travel trailer would be the easiest to get someone to tow to the spot for you. 5th wheel trailers were generally built a bit better but are harder to get towed by 3rd party or skirt for winter. Winter freeze protection is another issue.
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Old 05-01-2021, 04:22 PM   #11
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To help with realizing actual rental costs and other logistics, play around with this website for a learning experience: https://rvshare.com/?semid=bing.nb&p...FV3A9gIdc30LVg
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Old 05-06-2021, 11:21 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CC38EL View Post
Welcome.

I think it's great that you're looking into RVing as a lifestyle. But you're facing several obstacles at this early stage in your endeavor.

Most of your issues will stem from your age, income and insurability. Renting an RV which moves, may be financially strapping at $13.50/hr. Renting an RV which doesn't move without a truck may be more financially feasible....but insurance will not be your friend.

Don't know where you live or where your job will be, but those are also factors in living "off the grid". If you're going to be camp advisor in Idaho, there may be options for you. If you're in NYC or SF, it may be impossible.

I haven't looked hard, but renting a motorhome in the 1999-2001 age group isn't done often or everywhere. And if you've priced the current age group of RVs for rent, you know your entire check would go to pay the rent.

You asked 2 questions. In my opinion, I doubt you'll find that RV you're looking for to rent. Also in my opinion, I doubt you'll get approved.

Having said that, there may be a situation out there for you. But you're going to have look long and hard to find it.

Have you thought about a travel trailer and a nice truck?

Best of luck,
Jim
Thanks. Yes, I understand.

Yeah, I realize that. Well, my RV will be stationary 95% of the time, with the exception of fuel trips, refilling the fresh water tank, and routine service.

I will be moving back to Saint Augustine, Florida. I'm a freshman. I want to live in a rural area, and use to my car to commute to college.

Actually, I've done the research, and there are affordable 1990's Country Coaches and American Eagles. If I take out a 96-month lease or a bit shorter, rent will cost roughly $550 a month. Even with insurance and minimal expenses, I could save 30% of my income.

I did find an RV I'm interested in, but my approval situation will be difficult.

Thank you. I believe I will succeed.

Eh...I'm not interested in a travel trailer. I think a class A is much more beautiful and livable. I would like a sedan for a toad.
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Old 05-06-2021, 11:33 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Spdracr39 View Post
I am unaware of anyone that rents motorized coaches long term. Now if you are looking for a park model pull behind or 5th wheel maybe. Your costs will not be any less than renting a mobile home in a trailer park or a small house however. Short term rentals of class a coaches can be 1000-2000 dollars a week. You could purchase an older coach but most of those are either going to be in the 40-50 thousand dollar range or will be in need of extensive repairs and have no option to finance. Living in an RV full time strictly for the purpose of saving money is not really viable.

I am doing it but my coach and toad is paid for. I invested about $85,000 for the coach, rehab, and repair to get it travel ready, and a home base pad on my son's property to return to rent free (I mow his 3 acres with my zero turn when I'm there). I stay there 2 weeks and pay $364 a month for 2 weeks at the local COE. I am working full time and my health insurance is paid. My monthly budget is around $2500.00 but I might could get by on $2000.00 if I really made an effort. Were I traveling, paying fuel, and paying a full months camp fees costs would go up to $3500 monthly and that doesn't include health insurance. I also do all my own maintenance. The only reason I am doing it is to travel when I retire at the end of the year. there are better ways to save money.
Well, leasing, yes. I will lease long term. If I'm not mistaken, if it perfectly possible to finance an older coach. Again, I'm not living in a RV just for the sake of saving money. I genuinely admire the lifestyle.

You sound to be very detail-oriented about it; that's very good. I do think I can lease, maybe, a '98 American Eagle or Country Coach for $40,000...unless mileage would work against me. But my expenses will be much lower than yours. I won't be staying at camps; I will boondock on Bureau of Land Management Land, which is free if I'm not mistaken.
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Old 05-06-2021, 11:41 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by SKP Kirk View Post
There is a lot to learn about living in an RV, as their systems are quite different from those in a house. Major differences are things like the waste tanks that all waste water goes into until you empty them into the sewer connections, the appliances and lights operate on 12V power from batteries or a converter, and numerous other differences. I don't know of any RV rental company that has anything that is more than a couple of years old so you would have to buy the RV. Older RVs are reasonably priced but they can require a lot of maintenance that gets very expensive unless you do the work yourself. I do encourage you to keep on investigating as there may well be a good answer for what you want to do, but it will take some planning so keep learning.

Welcome to the RV forums!
I have done research for 9 months, and I do understand some components. If one boondocks, they can install a solar system, which will supply efficient, cost-effective electricity. If one installs a composting toilet, they will not have to empty their black tanks. Though they still have to dump their grey tanks, and refill their fresh water tanks. Even worn-in diesel engines can display remarkable durability if a RV is quality, like Country Coach and not low quality with a gas engine, like Thor or a class C. I'm willing to learn; it's part of the responsibility of ownership.

Thank you!
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