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Old 12-07-2021, 12:11 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by HenryH001 View Post
Maybe instead of best I should have said base. Yes itís physics that Iím dealing with but using temperature readings is an art. There are so may variables that effect the readings like the road surface temperature. Even where on the tire I get the reading. It might vary 20 degrees from the tread to the rim. Also how much was I using the brake. How heavy was my load? Are the bearings causing a high reading. Am I on black pavement or concrete?

I started using temperature readings when I drove long haul because in a month I might be pulling a dozen different trailers. I would hammer them to see if they were flat and then take temperature readings every few hours for the first day. If I had an usual high reading for the conditions I knew something was not right. Often the high reading would be on the inflated tire and not the one that was low.
There is no base temperature. The temperature readings that you mention are irrelevant to setting correct tire pressure.

Set/check the pressure in the morning, before the vehicle has been driven, before the tires have been exposed to direct sun, at whatever the ambient temperature happens to be. You donít even have to know, or measure, the ambient temperature. All you need is a pressure gauge or TPMS and an air compressor if the pressure is below what is recommended.

It doesnít get much easier.
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Old 12-07-2021, 01:11 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Kid Gloves View Post
There is no base temperature. The temperature readings that you mention are irrelevant to setting correct tire pressure.

Set/check the pressure in the morning, before the vehicle has been driven, before the tires have been exposed to direct sun, at whatever the ambient temperature happens to be. You donít even have to know, or measure, the ambient temperature. All you need is a pressure gauge or TPMS and an air compressor if the pressure is below what is recommended.

It doesnít get much easier.
Checking the tire pressure on a trailer that you just hooked to when it -20 degrees is not easy and could cost you your fingers to frostbite.

Temperature readings will not tell me if the tires are low either. It will only tell me if Iím about to have a major problem on a trailer where I have no history. If I get a high reading after two hours of driving when I shouldnít I know I have a problem.

You are absolutely correct in what you say however itís not always feasible.
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Old 12-07-2021, 01:46 PM   #31
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Maybe ďGas vs DieselĒ?

Despite the simplicity of properly setting tire pressures, a number of peculiar statements, ideas and theories continue to surface. So the discussion goes on.

I disagree with your statement above, that any pressure above the minimum, up to the max for the tire is good to go. The chart for our drive axle calls for a rounded up pressure of 90psi, which will support the RAWR plus about 800lbs. Our actual weight is below the RAWR and I wonít discuss the pressure that we run. I will say that I would never consider 120psi, the max rating for the tire, to be good to go. It is 33% above the recommended pressure.

Itís just too simple to determine and maintain the correct pressure. If anyone knew the minimum to be 90psi, why would they even consider running 120psi?
That 33% over the recommended is still a safe pressure from a blowout or tire failure point of view. It won't give the best ride, or the best stopping performance, or best wear pattern, but is is still considered a safe pressure. I agree with you that I wouldn't run that either, but I find pressure management such a simple task. However, for the owner who doesn't want to manage the pressures close to the optimum, he can be safe at 25-33% above the minimum needed.
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Old 12-07-2021, 01:48 PM   #32
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If not already mentioned.......make a note if tire is in sun...or shade.
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Old 12-07-2021, 02:06 PM   #33
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Love’s Truck Stops have a TirePass where you pay $5 and they will check them for you. I haven’t used it but see it being used.

I’ve always thought 65 to 70 degrees is the best temperature to read pressure. If I’m in sub freezing temperatures I’m not going to add pressure and if I’m in 100 degrees I’m not going to let air out. A hammer will tell you if a tire is out however it will not tell you if it’s at 80 pounds or 120. I use a infrared gauge to check running temperature however ambient temperature and direct sunshine will give you inaccurate readings. This is an art and not a science.

Sorry, but LOTS wrong here.


First, unless you overnight at the Loves where you will have tire pressure checked, the tires will not be cold. Cold is "at current ambient temperature before driving or sitting in sun or other heat source". Driving more than a few miles= NOT COLD by any tire manufacturers definition.


You said: "If I’m in sub freezing temperatures I’m not going to add pressure ...". Again that is incorrect. If you last checked the tires in the summer when it was 85 degrees F and it is now 32 degrees F, you absolutely WILL have to add air unless you know of a way to overcome the Ideal Gas Law.
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Old 12-07-2021, 02:28 PM   #34
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Just wondering how the airlines handle tire pressure while in flight from Anchorage to Honolulu or versa vicee.
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Old 12-07-2021, 02:55 PM   #35
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That 33% over the recommended is still a safe pressure from a blowout or tire failure point of view. It won't give the best ride, or the best stopping performance, or best wear pattern, but is is still considered a safe pressure. I agree with you that I wouldn't run that either, but I find pressure management such a simple task. However, for the owner who doesn't want to manage the pressures close to the optimum, he can be safe at 25-33% above the minimum needed.
Thereís more to tire safety than minimizing the risk of catastrophic failure. As youíve mentioned, inflating a tire 33% above the recommended pressure will compromise stopping distances as well as other handling characteristics. Put another way, it makes the vehicle less safe.

Iíve had this exact conversation with Tireman9, whoís advice I hold in high regard. Anyone whoís been around here for a minute, knows his credentials and his recommendations. He did not suggest that inflating to 33% over the recommended pressure would be a wise decision.

This topic lives on because a number of people have some bizarre ideas on how to properly inflate a tire and they refuse to listen to anything else.
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Old 12-07-2021, 03:04 PM   #36
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Checking the tire pressure on a trailer that you just hooked to when it -20 degrees is not easy and could cost you your fingers to frostbite.

Temperature readings will not tell me if the tires are low either. It will only tell me if Iím about to have a major problem on a trailer where I have no history. If I get a high reading after two hours of driving when I shouldnít I know I have a problem.

You are absolutely correct in what you say however itís not always feasible.
Put on some gloves. Would you ignore a chain up requirement because it was too cold?
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Old 12-07-2021, 03:22 PM   #37
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Thereís more to tire safety than minimizing the risk of catastrophic failure. As youíve mentioned, inflating a tire 33% above the recommended pressure will compromise stopping distances as well as other handling characteristics. Put another way, it makes the vehicle less safe.

Iíve had this exact conversation with Tireman9, whoís advice I hold in high regard. Anyone whoís been around here for a minute, knows his credentials and his recommendations. He did not suggest that inflating to 33% over the recommended pressure would be a wise decision.

This topic lives on because a number of people have some bizarre ideas on how to properly inflate a tire and they refuse to listen to anything else.
Again, I do not run more than 5'10% above recommended pressures. Let's just say we agree to disagree. I feel it is much safer for the guy who doesn't know, or doesn't want to take the time to managed close to the optimum pressure, to run the max psi on the sidewall than to let it get below the amount required for the load.
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Old 12-07-2021, 06:22 PM   #38
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If you are going to inflate to 10% above then you could just as well ignore the charts.
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Old 12-07-2021, 06:54 PM   #39
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We need a Smartphone with a program linked to an air compressor and tire scale with temperature compensation to calculate the exact air pressure needed. Then override it by 10 to 15%.

Until they make one, I'll use the PSI on the sticker in the cab.
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Old 12-07-2021, 08:23 PM   #40
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Again, I do not run more than 5'10% above recommended pressures. Let's just say we agree to disagree. I feel it is much safer for the guy who doesn't know, or doesn't want to take the time to managed close to the optimum pressure, to run the max psi on the sidewall than to let it get below the amount required for the load.
How can a guy or gal not know? The manufacturer provides a tire pressure placard on the vehicle. In my experience, every placard lists a pressure which will support an axle at its maximum rating. In some cases drive and tag axles only require 80-90psi, yet the tire will likely have a max rating of 120psi. It would require an almost unimaginable degree of ignorance to just inflate all the tires to the sidewall maximum, when the basic information to make a knowledgeable decision is so readily available.
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Old 12-07-2021, 08:32 PM   #41
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If you are going to inflate to 10% above then you could just as well ignore the charts.
Well, youíd have to pay enough attention to the chart to determine what pressure would be 10% above the recommended chart pressure.

Of course if one were to actually read all the words that accompany the chart, it would become apparent that the recommended pressures are the minimum pressures required to support a given load. If you add 10%, you will spend much less time dilly dallying around with a pressure gauge and air hose every time the pressure drops 1psi.
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Old 12-07-2021, 08:52 PM   #42
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Just wondering how the airlines handle tire pressure while in flight from Anchorage to Honolulu or versa vicee.
I believe they use nitrogen!

Fwiw, I’m one of those (ex) long haul truckers, checked my tires every 14-15 thousand miles when I serviced the truck and trailer at home.
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