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Old 01-25-2017, 06:36 AM   #1
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Question Cable snow chains- anybody ever used these

I had to buy chains while in Oregon. They are the standard link type. I would be very worried if I ever had to use them. Has anyone ever used those cable type on their class A?
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Old 01-25-2017, 08:29 AM   #2
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Check out the "Snow Chains or Snow Socks" thread. Snow Socks look like a very good alternative with a much slimmer chance of doing damage to your wheel well area on the MH. Hope you never have to use them!
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Old 01-25-2017, 09:20 AM   #3
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Been a number of years, but yes, and really liked them. The first set was a fairly cheap brand because I was unsure I would like them. They worked very well, were easy to put on the tires, but because they were cheap didn't last very long. My second set was better quality and lasted quite a bit longer.
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Old 01-25-2017, 09:23 AM   #4
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It's been decades and not on a MH but and F250. My experience is they were great except for one draw back, they were smooth and encouraged going above the recommended 45 mph so I did and they don't last long at 55-60. The cross link "rollers" tend to disintegrate.

I tried out snow socks the other day by wrapping my boots in and old towel and walking around the icy yard and drive and they worked better that the normal slip on variety like YakTrax. How durable the snow socks would be ?
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Old 01-25-2017, 10:39 AM   #5
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AutoSock

AutoSock is good for snow and ice only. Not for use on bare pavement, and never at speeds over 30 mph. Some people get over-confident and start speeding up as they get more confident using chains. That's when damage can get real expensive. Also chewing up a long grade can break a cross link, then things get ugly fast! Long story short, drive slow, and take them off (chains, cables, or AutoSocks) as soon as you are out of the bad stuff. Hope you never need them.
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Old 01-26-2017, 03:41 PM   #6
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Best advice I ever got was keep them to stay legal (here you need them Oct 1-April in the mountains) but if you need them, pull over and wait it out.

The one time I probably could have used them was in Yellowstone in June! But the weight of the coach helped us through.

I kept them because it was the law, I never would actually use them.
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Old 01-26-2017, 04:55 PM   #7
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I agree with Driveby. Keep them with you for legal purposes ...but it's just not worth actually using them.

I say this each time this topic is brought up but it's always worth repeating. Yes, in some states such as Oregon and Washington, you do need to have chains (or an approved alternative device) on-board in certain stretches of highway (interstates included) during the winter months.

However, it's just not worth using them on a Class A motorhome unless you absolutely have to because of having to be somewhere at a certain time. You have a house on wheels so if the road conditions are such that the "chains required" is in effect, just pull off the highway in a safe place and wait it out.

It's a top priority in mountainous states to keep the interstate highways open. They will do everything possible to keep the road plowed and open. If they have to close the road because of conditions, they want that to be for the shortest time as possible. There's lots of commercial traffic depending on the road being open and accessible. Therefore, the "chains required" conditions or even closing the road completely will last for as little time as is possible.

Some Class A motorhomes do not have the clearance to run link chains so make sure you have enough clearance to use chains on your Class A if you do intend to use them.

Also, be aware that if a link breaks, a lot of damage can be done to the body of your rig ...steel links beating against fiberglass especially isn't a good thing. Sometimes a lot of damage can be done before you realize you have a broken link and get stopped ...not always but there are times you won't know until a lot of damage has been done.

And, it's not fun for most of us to be putting chains on a vehicle with large dualies. Most of the time it will be freezing with snow coming down and could be slushy and wet on the shoulder of the road as you installing or removing chains. I'm a former commercial driver and although I got pretty good at doing it quickly, it was never a real "fun" thing to do.

For others contemplating buying chains, you may want to look into the AutoSock idea that Unplanned mentioned (HERE is the thread that was referenced) as they are approved in 48 states as a chain substitute. At least they are easier to install and remove if you just have to be somewhere when the "chains required" is in effect. Just remember that running the AutoSock on bare pavement for just a short distance could ruin them.
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Old 01-28-2017, 12:45 PM   #8
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Called Colorado State police about chains before a trip there the beginning of January.
There's a lot of confusion about chains and cable chains.
I was able to speak with 5 officers at a morning conference cable and a few were also vague but one Sargent who managed their Truck and Heavy vehicles said that they used Cables and not old school Chains.
I told them I was considering the Security Chain Z-583 and they said the used Security as well.
Just a note.
Carry them but try to never use them. Pull over and enjoy the day rather than battle the snow.
Especially if there is any grade at all.
Good luck
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