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Old 10-05-2018, 09:06 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Wbonsell View Post
Anyone ever checked heat across the tread via an infrared temp gauge. Always worked racing to verify under or over inflation.

You know that is a good point on the larger 22.5 tires on ours i have heat monitor in the pressure sensors. I can say there is little noticeable difference in the heat readings probably the giant size of them contributes to that.

I would suspect in smaller tires less air volume this might give better indications
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Old 10-06-2018, 10:42 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Erik_Laura View Post
thank you for the replies! I agree with everyones analysis.

I will track down corner weights asap, and keep it at 95psi until I get more accurate numbers (then add 5+ for a buffer).

thanks for the post about the wear pattern, I will monitor that more closely!

thank you all for taking the time to respond. we have an amazing community here!
l Think it's important you read this Goodyear tire inflation and loading guide closely, pay attention to the paragraph titled important: It's a common practice for RV owners to lower tire pressure in their search for a smoother ride. This is not only dangerous, it's relatively ineffective, as the difference in ride quality is not significant. When minimum inflation pressure requirements are not met, tire durability and optimum operating conditions are compromised. Tire inflation pressure should always meet at least the minimum guidelines for vehicle weight.
The paragraph tire loading: Tire pressure should never be reduced below the vehicle manufacturer's recommended levels to support load conditions in order to improve the ride quality of a vehicle. The difference in ride quality is not significant. When minimum inflation pressure requirements are not met, tire durability and optimum operation can be affected.
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Old 10-06-2018, 11:07 AM   #17
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I am not an expert. I do know if you weigh your vehicle you will find out either you need to remove stuff or you don't. If you need to remove stuff it will be all your stuff as the WIFE will not give up her STUFF.

Look at the tire sidewall and inflate to the pressure indicated on the sidewall of your tires as that is what the mfg. says is proper for those tires. Then see how it feels. If the ride is too stiff, let out a few pounds until you get a comfortable ride and watch the tread wear. If you see a wear pattern that indicates you need to increase or decrease the pressure, do so.

If you think a few hundred extra pounds will make a difference in a coach that weighs twenty or thirty thousand pounds or more you are worrying for nothing.

JMHO if you feel better weighing the rig and acting accordingly then please do so with my blessing and don't get mad.
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Old 10-06-2018, 12:18 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Wbonsell View Post
Anyone ever checked heat across the tread via an infrared temp gauge. Always worked racing to verify under or over inflation.



In racing where most of the heat is from the friction between the tread surface and the race track that is reasonable. However, in normal highway service, the heat is generated internal to the tire structure with the belt edge being one of the hottest locations with the tire surface (sidewall and tread) being much cooler.
Rubber is a good insulator so unlike with a bad wheel bearing heating the entire hub to about the same temperature Different locations on a tire can have 50F to maybe 100F temperature difference just an inch or less away.
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Old 10-06-2018, 10:05 PM   #19
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I go by the motorhome/chassis specification and not the tire spec...
This is precisely the wrong way to do it. This absolutely guarantees a rough ride and bad handling. The motorhome/chassis builder publishes this as a "CYA" and it is not an accurate way to determine the right tire pressure for your situation. If I used that method in our coach (like the previous owner did) I would have a hard-riding, over-steering monster on my hands. At the correct tire pressures, which were substantially lower than the placard on the inside of the motor home, the coach is a delight to drive.

The only accurate way to determine the correct tire pressure is a 4-corner weigh and then a review of the tire manufacturer's inflation chart.
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Old 10-07-2018, 02:42 PM   #20
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wow here ya'll go again.. jeez. now remember every expert here says check cold and its 40 degrees in morning when I do checklist but I take off at noon its 75 degrees. hence tires overinflated... or just the opposite you check nite before and you leave at 5:30 ...and don't tell me that is rare, it is the norm in northern states.. heck I wake up in December and its -40 and at 3pm its 45 above... whats your tire say, i'm cold!! ya right its all perceived of what is right.. just gather experience and you will learn.,... everybody gives the right answer only none are same except the ones "that know" ya right... engineers do nothing but design the cheapest best they know.. heck the cheapest bid on space shuttle parts are accepted, not the best designed.. just have to meet to specs. Hundred different ways to accomplish that.. just have to know math and that is how many pounds supported by one psi at max load... then find your load and divide by that number.i don't need no stinking charts. now there was another math equation that was different but came up with same psi,.,, now let the heat come and say... but immmmm AHHH OOOO..jeff again
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Old 10-08-2018, 09:48 AM   #21
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Since I run a TPMS I know the tire's response to my actual load, speed and traveling ambient. In the Am I turn on the TPMS and after my coffee I know the current inflation. I also consider the expected temperature on my travel day. Since I set my pressure at +10% of the minimum needed to carry the actual measured load on the tires I have a nice range of pressures that I know are OK. My 10% gives me an allowance for a 50F swing in temperature which while possible is not normal. Last march I traveled with the ambient changing from 25F to 60F and had no problems with inflation being too low. or too high in my motorhome.
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Old 10-08-2018, 02:01 PM   #22
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Tires are put together with heat. They can come apart the same way... Heat is the enemy of tires. The load / inflation tables are based upon a tire carrying a load at a specified pressure at a specified speed. (The charts that we see are usually 55 to 65 mph.) The pressure recommendation for the tire is designed to allow the tire to flex where it is designed to flex and to operate at a temperature that will not cause the tire to overheat. A tire should build up some pressure when it is rolling under load due to a normal heat build up. A tire that has been running at speed for several miles should have a pressure build up of approximately 10%. If it is building up more than that you are under inflated and you need to add air. If it does not build up any pressure you are over inflated as the tire is not being allowed to flex. You can reduce the air pressure in this case to allow the tire to act as it should to absorb some of the road shock and to reduce the chance of it being damaged by a sudden impact. Always check the pressures cold. Then check them again as soon as you stop from running. You will find the cold pressure you need usually is lower than the maximum stated on the sidewall of the tire. It is important to keep dual tire pressures as close to the same as possible so that one tire does not become over heated. Always error on the side of over inflation if there is any doubt. By the way, the faster you drive the hotter the tires get.
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Old 10-08-2018, 06:32 PM   #23
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ya now it sounds good but where did you get your facts?? and the pages that show your calculations ?? is it learned, experience, or read??
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