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Old 11-03-2016, 07:58 PM   #15
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Accelerating is the way they teach 18 wheeler drivers to avoid a catastrophe. They actually place wireless charges on the side wall of tires and then detonate remotely to teach them how to recover. When you have a front tire blow out, the inertia of the rig tends to make the front end dive down and to the side. Accelerating is not going to make you go faster. You have a blow out. By accelerating, it throws that inertia to the back of the rig and off the front to allow you to gain control and then easing off the accelerator slowly to safety. That's always been my understanding and reasoning for accelerating.
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Old 11-03-2016, 11:49 PM   #16
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Michelin blow out

Quote:
Originally Posted by Darwin View Post
I run 100 Psig. My last set of Michelin tires were excellent, one reason I replaced in kind.

Have you weight all 4 corners, coach fully loaded (all fluids, fuel, water, sewer, propane, people, etc).That is what is used to set the tire pressures as well as verifying that you are not overloaded.

I do it every 2 or 3 years (in case I have moved things around). My front axle is with in 75 pounds left to right and 300 under the axle rating. The rear difference is 200 L to R and 1300 under rating. Michelin (and all the other major manufacturers) have charts that show the recommended pressure with the specific weight on the axle, I run 5 over their ideal pressure and monitor with TPMS.
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Old 11-04-2016, 07:10 AM   #17
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The motor home I bought this summer has 4 year old Michelin xrv on all six wheels. However before I leave for Calif. in April it will have Toyo or Yokohama tires put on the steering axle. Forty years of criss crossing this country in a semi has made me very opinionated about what brand of tires I'm using, especially the ones I'm aiming this thing with
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Old 11-04-2016, 07:24 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by marjoa View Post
Accelerating is the way they teach 18 wheeler drivers to avoid a catastrophe. They actually place wireless charges on the side wall of tires and then detonate remotely to teach them how to recover. When you have a front tire blow out, the inertia of the rig tends to make the front end dive down and to the side. Accelerating is not going to make you go faster. You have a blow out. By accelerating, it throws that inertia to the back of the rig and off the front to allow you to gain control and then easing off the accelerator slowly to safety. That's always been my understanding and reasoning for accelerating.
I studied for the Class A CDL. It was back when they first came out, but I don't remember reading about stepping on the gas in a blow out. I know it's not in today's instruction manual.

Many of my co-workers had Class A, CDL licenses and never had to drive with explosive charges on their front tires to pass the test. A number of them went to private driving schools.

Where is this taught ?
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Old 11-04-2016, 10:12 AM   #19
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I, too, disagree with the video. In the 27 years I've been driving an RV, I've had 4 blowouts; 2 on the front. Of those, 1 was at 65mph, the second was at 55mph while slowing down going down a freeway offramp. Never did I have a problem controlling the RV when the tire blew, even in the instance when I was going downhill (freeway offramp) and already on the brakes. I simply let off the gas, gently applied the brakes, and slowed to a stop.

The last thing I would ever do in the case of a blowout is step on the gas; it is counter-productive. Even if you buy the idea that it will un-weight the front axle to regain control (I don't), as soon as you let off the gas, you are right back where you started, at the same or even higher speed. You've gained nothing. Perhaps if you are having trouble controlling it, applying throttle can help regain the control? Sorry, I'm still skeptical, since again, as soon as you let off, you are right back where you started.
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Old 11-10-2016, 02:45 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twinboat View Post
I studied for the Class A CDL. It was back when they first came out, but I don't remember reading about stepping on the gas in a blow out. I know it's not in today's instruction manual.

Many of my co-workers had Class A, CDL licenses and never had to drive with explosive charges on their front tires to pass the test. A number of them went to private driving schools.

Where is this taught ?
2 links concerning blowout procedure:
1) http://rvlife.com/rv-tire-blowout-disaster/

2) I may have misspoke about training schools teaching this acceleration method using tire explosives. Some schools may, some schools may not I don't know. But just to clarify I never said anything about passing a test. But the video below does use explosives to demonstrate the procedure. The explosives are used around 3:50 timeline in the video:
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Old 11-10-2016, 07:10 AM   #21
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I'm not an engineer or truck driver and i don't play one on TV. But to my thinking, a tractor/trailer rig is a different animal all together.

Just thinking out loud,,, that shorter wheel base of the tractor, along with the weight of the trailer and its drag, may make it to where accelerating helps for keeping/regaining control. I have no doubt the front end would become lighter when the pedal was pushed. On a one piece motorhome though, and this is my opinion only, i can't see this as helping very much.
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Old 11-10-2016, 07:36 AM   #22
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Considering the weight, length, and power of a motorhome, it's not possible to transfer weight to the rear. That video is nothing more than someone's opinion. I've had front blowouts. Hold the wheel tight and ease off of the throttle. When it slows down slowly pull off the road. When you do have a blow out, I can guarantee that you will lift from instinct. It takes a couple seconds to figure out what just happened. By that time you are already slowing down. By flooring it, you will gain back the speed you just lost. The whole flooring it deal just doesn't make any sense.
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Old 11-10-2016, 08:52 AM   #23
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Considering the weight, length, and power of a motorhome, it's not possible to transfer weight to the rear. That video is nothing more than someone's opinion. I've had front blowouts. Hold the wheel tight and ease off of the throttle. When it slows down slowly pull off the road. When you do have a blow out, I can guarantee that you will lift from instinct. It takes a couple seconds to figure out what just happened. By that time you are already slowing down. By flooring it, you will gain back the speed you just lost. The whole flooring it deal just doesn't make any sense.
While you are moving the momentum is straight ahead. If, for example the right front tire blows, a percentage of the momentum is shifted to the right. By applying more throttle you restore most of the momentum back to the straight ahead direction. Make sense to me.
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Old 11-10-2016, 10:07 AM   #24
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Get going 60 MPH and step on the throttle. How much "in to the seat" push is a typical MH going create.

There is going to be a few seconds of turbo lag to overcome, especially after naturally letting off the throttle due to the startling boom.
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Old 11-10-2016, 10:20 AM   #25
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Quote:
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Get going 60 MPH and step on the throttle. How much "in to the seat" push is a typical MH going create.

There is going to be a few seconds of turbo lag to overcome, especially after naturally letting off the throttle due to the startling boom.
Good thing you said "typical" because mine isn't!
On the way to Junction City in an hour or so to get all 8 tires replaced. They are the original Michelins and some are dated late 2007 and some are early 2008. Never had a blowout on a motorhome and my first puncture/flat on a motorhome last Thursday. Have had motorhomes since 1988 and have used nothing but Michelins on any of them.
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Old 11-10-2016, 12:04 PM   #26
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OP: Glad to hear the video procedure worked for you. We personally know two other RVers that this has worked for so there must be something to it.

We've never had a blowout but did use Michelins. They were good for us in all the traveling we've done.... including Alaska.
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Old 11-10-2016, 02:28 PM   #27
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OP - Glad this worked out for you, and you were safe - congrats!!

I may have missed it, but what was the tire model, and size would be good info too...

And lots of dialog about what to do during a blowout. Sure, Michelin has no experience with truck tires, and what to do in case of a blowout - so who would ever want to listen to them...

I feel it is important for everyone to post their opinions, but these are the kinds of opinions that could effect how someone responds during and emergency - so voicing these opinions with a bit of caution, is I feel prudent.

My opinion on what I would do in case of a highway speed front tire blowout? Well, my opinion is just too many variable to provide an meaningful opinion now. The circumstances and variables are so great, that the only advice I would give, it to watch the Michelin and or or other Trucker related, tire blowout emergency maneuvering videos. This way you at least have them in your memory as a reference to consider, based upon the 'actual' conditions of when you might have a front tire blowout.

-May not need to do anything but gracefully coast to the side of the road
-May need to apply some braking, due to traffic and or road conditions (Going down a curving mountain road for example, braking maybe required.)
-May find your coach nose diving towards the side of the blowout, and feel that punching the accelerator may allow you to regain control.

I hope to never have to come on and share as the the OP just did, about how we handled a front tire blowout.

And guys, just a real world experience I can share on tire care. We were driving on California Highway 99 about 18 months or so ago now. I was in the right lane, behind several trucks, and had several trucks behind me too. The left passing lane also had a steady line of trucks and vehicles passing us in the right lane. In addition to the pretty moderate/heavy traffic, on the right side shoulder of the road, two trucks had pulled over and had their flashers on. As were coming up on where the trucks were off to the side of the road, I noted the truck in front of me bounce a bit, sure enough, a large deep pot hole was on right 1/3 of the lane. I could not go left, I could not go right, I stabbed my brakes and slowed down some, was able to just miss the pot hole with the front passenger steer, but both the outside dual, and tag, hit that pot hole hard. Really one of our hardest jarring hits ever in this coach, worse then anything we'd encountered along Destruction Bay on the ALCAN.

We pulled off a the next safe place, and I visually walked the coach, and the toad (Toad's narrower track, allowed it to miss the hole, or most of it, as I watched in the rear view camera, and it did not look it bounced much at all.)

I could see marks on the outside passenger dual, and tag, along where the tread had made impact on the pot hole, this was a hard edge pothole - not yet broken down. But the rims and tires both looked OK. So we proceeded on our travels. Flash forward a week later, now in Reno, NV. I was walking the rig, when I noted a bulge in the sidewall of the dual tire, and upon close inspection, a sort of wave in the side wall of the tag. I did some searching on Google, and concluded I had two sick tires. I contacted poster Tireman9 via IRV2's PM. He had me send him pictures, and said it looked like a broken belt on the dual tire, and a slipping belt on the tag. He recommend I replace them. (Of course during a Michelin Tire Shortage, which then made other brands scarce too, in the 12R 22.5 tire I wanted to obtain. Finally located two semi young BF Goodrich ST230's, and then fresh tires mounted on the Steers, moving the two Steers to Dual and Tag duty.)

Why the long story? Our roadways are terrible, and just because my first inspection seemed to indicate that I had survived damage, it was not the case. In hindsight, I should have stopped at the next place where I could get the tires dismounted and inspected internally, as they broken belt would have shown for sure, and good chance the slipping belt would have been visible from inside inspection too. Oh, and by the way. These were about 5 1/2 year old Michelin XZE*'s tires. Very robust, with extra meat on the side to handle regional delivery curb kissing opportunities. IMO, if my tires had not been as robust as they were, I could have had a blow out on the dual impact of the pot hole.

The morale of my story. When in doubt, do get your tires inspected by a professional. Be willing to spend the money for dismounting and remounting. It could save you from a future blowout... or worse.

(And OP, not saying you had damaged tires. But, who knows, maybe some impact awhile back, finally developed into a problem...)

Best to all. Do your research. Try to think about what you would do in different scenarios of a blowout. Talk it over with your copilot. May not really help, especially if someone freezes during a blowout - but, it could also help - as in practice drills and visualization of say a game day move on football!

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Old 11-10-2016, 05:48 PM   #28
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[QUOTE=Smitty77;3331132]....I feel it is important for everyone to post their opinions, but these are the kinds of opinions that could effect how someone responds during and emergency - so voicing these opinions with a bit of caution, is I feel prudent...[QUOTE]

For sure, that's why I made my post. My post tells what exactly happened to my coach and exactly how I handled it...successfully. My post was real, the Michelin video is a movie made for TV.
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