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Old 11-24-2016, 01:28 AM   #43
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Weighed the Motor Home. Bought Toyo M177 from Les Schwab. Motor Home pacard says 110 front and 95 rear. Schwab recommends 100 all around. Running 100 front and 95 rear. Still plenty of pad considering weight and tire capacity. Great discussion about tires.
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Old 12-06-2016, 07:35 PM   #44
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I run 105 front 95 rear (cold). After they heat up from running down the road after about 30 mins, they'll gain 8-10 psi in pressure according to my tpms. My (probably dumb) question is, is this normal?? Running Michelins which I do really like so far.


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Old 12-06-2016, 08:02 PM   #45
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I run 105 front 95 rear (cold). After they heat up from running down the road after about 30 mins, they'll gain 8-10 psi in pressure according to my tpms. My (probably dumb) question is, is this normal?? Running Michelins which I do really like so far.


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Yup, that pretty much mirrors what ours do according to the TPMS. The tire temperature actually goes up MORE than that, but the TPMS spins around in the ambient air, thereby cooling it some so it doesn't register the total tire temperature increase. We run 105 or so all around. After awhile, the pressure will climb to about 112, and the temp will climb maybe 20 or 30 degrees (don't hold me to the temp increase, but the pressure is right on).
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Old 12-07-2016, 06:08 AM   #46
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Originally Posted by cdinatl View Post
I run 105 front 95 rear (cold). After they heat up from running down the road after about 30 mins, they'll gain 8-10 psi in pressure according to my tpms. My (probably dumb) question is, is this normal?? Running Michelins which I do really like so far.


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If you fill the tires with nitrogen the pressure won't fluctuate nearly as much.
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Old 12-07-2016, 08:19 AM   #47
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If you fill the tires with nitrogen the pressure won't fluctuate nearly as much.
Yeah! Finally someone with the correct answer
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Old 12-07-2016, 08:49 AM   #48
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Yeah! Finally someone with the correct answer
True, but just a little. I bit on that line and had all of my 22" tires filled with Nitrogen. Instead of the psi rising from 115 up to 138 on hot asphalt, they went from 115 up to 135-136. Hardly worth the effort and certainly not worth the expense.
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Old 12-07-2016, 08:57 AM   #49
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Yeah! Finally someone with the correct answer
Maybe...maybe not. OK...maybe you are addressing the specifics of air vs nitrogen on changes to operating temps as opposed to whether nitrogen is "better" than air.

Yes, air does contain more water vapor than nitrogen only but IMHO, that is not a reason to go nitrogen since tire manufacturers specifications and expectations are NOT based on the exclusive use of nitrogen. The pressure changes of regular air are baked into the normal operations of tires.

Comparison of nitrogen versus air in your tires | TireBuyer.com

If you use your car on a regular basis for daily driving and donít fall into any of the above categories, itís difficult to see how using nitrogen gives you any practical benefits, especially compared to its cost and inconvenience. But itís your call Ė nitrogen does no harm to your tires and if youíre interested, you can test it out. If you donít like it or donít see any benefits, you can always go back to the free (or almost free) alternative that weíve all used successfully for years: air.

One final thought...

If one pays attention to tire pressure as much as they should, then they will know that if one travels a lot and runs into changing weather conditions that adding and removing pressure is often an appropriate function. If one doesn't haul around a tank of nitrogen to add pressure to tires then what are you going to do when tires need more pressure? I'm just sayin'...
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Old 12-08-2016, 04:57 AM   #50
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Air is 78% Nitrogen. Nitrogen is a gas and like any gas it is subject to pressure changes when the ambient temp changes. The main advantage to Nitrogen use tires is because of the larger molecules it is less likely to permeate through the inner liner. However, today's inner liner's allow almost no air seepage so the advantages of Nitrogen are minimal.
Hardly worth the cost.
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Old 12-08-2016, 05:57 AM   #51
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Maybe...maybe not. OK...maybe you are addressing the specifics of air vs nitrogen on changes to operating temps as opposed to whether nitrogen is "better" than air.

Yes, air does contain more water vapor than nitrogen only but IMHO, that is not a reason to go nitrogen since tire manufacturers specifications and expectations are NOT based on the exclusive use of nitrogen. The pressure changes of regular air are baked into the normal operations of tires.

Comparison of nitrogen versus air in your tires | TireBuyer.com

If you use your car on a regular basis for daily driving and donít fall into any of the above categories, itís difficult to see how using nitrogen gives you any practical benefits, especially compared to its cost and inconvenience. But itís your call Ė nitrogen does no harm to your tires and if youíre interested, you can test it out. If you donít like it or donít see any benefits, you can always go back to the free (or almost free) alternative that weíve all used successfully for years: air.

One final thought...

If one pays attention to tire pressure as much as they should, then they will know that if one travels a lot and runs into changing weather conditions that adding and removing pressure is often an appropriate function. If one doesn't haul around a tank of nitrogen to add pressure to tires then what are you going to do when tires need more pressure? I'm just sayin'...
The air we breath is nearly all nitrogen, close to 80%. If your tires are low, put air in them. No big deal. Temp related pressure fluctuation is much less with nitrogen.
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Old 12-08-2016, 06:04 AM   #52
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Add Nitrogen to the Dealer applied paint sealant and other add on scams.......
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Old 12-08-2016, 07:15 AM   #53
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If you fill the tires with nitrogen the pressure won't fluctuate nearly as much.
I use a special blend of gasses consisting of 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, 0.9% argon, and 0.1% of a proprietary blend of other gasses. Works for me!
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Old 12-08-2016, 07:49 AM   #54
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I use a special blend of gasses consisting of 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen, 0.9% argon, and 0.1% of a proprietary blend of other gasses. Works for me!

So we are in at least 78% agreement on using nitrogen in our tires.
If the other smaller molecules tend to leak out, then can we conclude that by the third top-up we are pretty close to pure nitrogen without the added expense?
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Old 12-08-2016, 11:35 AM   #55
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Measurable vs Meaningfull

Every time the topic of Nitrogen comes up people seem to ignore the fact that some companies that want to sell Nitrogen inflation equipment will tell you the truth. i.e.
"Nitrogen leaks out slower than Oxygen"
BUT what they do not tell you that the difference in the leak rate of tires filled with air vs tires inflated with N2 is about 4% a year, so if a tire inflated to 90 psi air is not checked or maintained for a year it may loose 10.5 psi while a tire inflated at a N2 location will probably loose 6.6 psi. I would not consider the difference meaningful and more importantly not checking and adjusting inflation only once a year is a bad polity.

Fuel Economy. The claim that N2 will give better fuel economy is also based on the assumption that you never check or adjust inflation.

Wheel corrosion. Is anyone having serious problem with the outside of their tires corroding? Remember they are always exposed to the 21% Oxygen air

You might check my blog post on Measurable vs Meaningful before listening to the hype.
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Old 12-08-2016, 11:49 AM   #56
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The air we breath is nearly all nitrogen, close to 80%. If your tires are low, put air in them. No big deal. Temp related pressure fluctuation is much less with nitrogen.
I don't believe fluctuations are "much less". I think that in real life they will be marginally different but not significant.

Based on what you just said, I suspect you agree with me that paying for nitrogen tire fillings is a waste of $$$.
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