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Old 10-25-2020, 11:23 AM   #1
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New Tires Class A

I need new tires 2015 Fleetwood Southwind 34A. 38,000 miles on original tires. Michelin XRV 235 80R 22.5 I can’t find them in stock locally. I have always been a “Michelin Man” but not sure anymore. Would like some “expert” opinions. Thanks in advance
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Old 10-25-2020, 11:34 AM   #2
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Last year I replaced our Michelins with Firestones. Saved $700 over discounted Michelins and better weight rating. We have driven about 4,000 miles and so far they are good.
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Old 10-25-2020, 07:01 PM   #3
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I'm not an "expert" but I'll chime in anyway as I have on a lot of the threads here on this subject.

You'll see a lot of threads on this forum pertaining to the exact same question you are posing. The 235/80R22.5 used to be proprietary to Michelin and the size that is almost identical is 245/75R22.5. Most of us replaced our OEM Michelins with Toyo as you will see if you do a search on this forum.

I have nothing against either Michelin or Bridgestone but both are considered "first-tier" and you pay a price for that.

Yes, like you, some here on the forum are die-hard Michelin fans or as you put it, being a "Michelin man." Nothing wrong with that but some on this forum continue to contend that they won't put their family's safety at risk by purchasing any other brand but Michelin. To me, and I apologize if it offends you, that's just nuts!

Michelin is NOT the only tire that is safe and never fails. My contention is to not pick up on that mantra as it is provably false. Other brands of tires are just as safe as Michelin.

My favorite brands are Toyo, Yokohama, Sumitomo, and Hankook. They may not get the wear-ratings as Michelins do (not important, however, in a motorhome application) and sometimes may not even rate as high as Michelins in testing, ride, or handling but come extremely close. However, the one big contrast to me is the PRICE. As mentioned earlier, you are paying a premium for the Michelin name.

Again, the most popular replacement for the OEM Michelins for a large number of motorhome owners are TOYO commercial truck tires. They get very good reviews on this and other RV forums.

You'll pay several hundred dollars less per tire for Toyo, Yokohama, Sumitomo, and Hankook as you would for the comparable tire from Michelin.

Most of the commercial truck tires from Yokohama and Sumitomo are produced in the U.S. if that's important to you. Yokohama makes all their commercial truck tires in Mississippi and Sumitomo is transitioning to produce most of their commercial truck tires at their plant near Buffalo NY.

To give you the illustration in price, here is the Michelin XRV at TireRack (just for example purposes ...you can probably find them for slightly less at other dealers or through the FMCA program)

Michelin XRV at TireRack 235/80R22.5 -- $534.09

Compare the sample prices for comparable Toyo, Bridgestone, Sumitomo, and Yokohama for size 245/75R22.5 at IDCarid (again, for example and comparison only)

In addition to Michelin and Continental, the FMCA program also offers Hankook so you can keep that in mind if you are an FMCA member.

If you insist on paying more for Michelin, go for it --nothing wrong with that ...but please keep in mind that it is a fallacy to believe that any brand other than Michelin is unsafe.






eta: I'm not sure if Hankook has that size so we'd have to do more research or wait for somebody to chime in if you're interested in Hankook through FMCA.
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Old 10-25-2020, 07:16 PM   #4
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There's quite a few quality tires out there and folks will tend to respond with what has worked for them. And, I've only purchased one set of tires for a motorhome, and went with Toyo tires and they've served us well since July of 2018.
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Old 10-26-2020, 05:05 PM   #5
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As nice as Michelins ride, my experience has been that they're more prone to weather checking. I have Sumitomo on my class A currently. Nothing wrong with them, but I'll probably try Toyo next time just out of curiosity. They seem to have a lot of fans.
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Old 10-26-2020, 05:15 PM   #6
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Tires ?

I just put a set of Sailuns on my coach and could not be more pleased.
Had balance beads installed all round and now she rides like a dream.
A VERY quiet tire ! And substantially less $$$.

The 7 year old (35K) Michelins were all weather cracked around the logo letters and my local shop would not even balance them for fear they would explode.
Mike in Colorado
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Old 10-26-2020, 05:27 PM   #7
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Sound advice from theroc and others. On my coaches I've used both Toyo & Continental with excellent results.
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Old 10-26-2020, 05:33 PM   #8
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I went to a truck tire shop and got a set of Yokohama’s. I have no complaints and can’t even tell the difference from the stock Mitchelins except for the price.
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Old 10-26-2020, 05:36 PM   #9
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I just put Cooper tires on my coach. Pretty pleased with them so far, and the price was fair, $2800 for 6 tires 275/70R 22.5, including balancing and installation. I got them from motorhometires.com, they shipped them to an installer near me, and the installer came to our campground to put them on.
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Old 10-26-2020, 08:09 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyer15015 View Post
I just put a set of Sailuns on my coach and could not be more pleased.
Had balance beads installed all round and now she rides like a dream.
A VERY quiet tire ! And substantially less $$$.

The 7 year old (35K) Michelins were all weather cracked around the logo letters and my local shop would not even balance them for fear they would explode.
Mike in Colorado
Where are Sailuns made?
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Old 10-27-2020, 02:01 AM   #11
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Where are Sailuns made?
Sailun is a Chinese company with its world corporate headquarters located in Qingdao China and was established in 2002. It's a third-tier tire but has a relatively good reputation within U.S. trucking industry. It's U.S. subsidiary is headquartered in Florida. The majority of foreign tire companies will have U.S. subsidiaries.

Sailun has five factories the last I checked but that may have changed. Four are in China and one is in Vietnam. So I'd assume that their commercial truck tires will come from either China or Vietnam. They sell their commercial truck tires in over 50 countries worldwide. From all that I've heard, for a Chinese tire, they have very good quality control and their engineering and technical development are excellent also.

Again, they are a third-tier tire. So yes, they will be less expensive than first and second tier brands.

Personally, I neither like buying first-tier tires as they are over-priced and you pay a premium for the name ...such as Michelin and I also tend not to consider third-tier Chinese tires either even though their quality has improved greatly.

Brands such as Sailun and Double Coin, for example, are considered very good products by the U.S. trucking industry and represent excellent value as truck companies and operators want value (long tread life and durability for a low price) as they put so many miles on a tire. The vast majority of tires made in China are no longer considered unsafe. But personally, I just do not like to consider Chinese products for my own political reasons. Yes, some things we don't have a choice but if we do, I consciously want to stay away from Chinese products.

Personally, I still recommend the brands mentioned in my previous post for RV use ...Toyo, Yokohama, Sumitomo, and Hankook. These are Japanese (and a South Korean) companies with U.S. subsidiaries and as mentioned, Yokohama and Sumitomo are now producing their commercial truck tires in U.S. plants. I personally feel that their quality, engineering, and features essentially equal those of the first-tier tires (e.g. Michelin, Goodyear, etc.) but for a much lower price. Not as low as the Chinese brands but substantially below the cost of Michelin, Bridgestone, Goodyear, Continental, and other first-tier tires.

That's just me but others obviously will disagree. You have to do what you feel is best. Sailun commercial truck tires will be just fine from a standpoint of safety and durability. Yes, they will be cheaper than those I mentioned so you'll definitely save money by buying Sailun and will be getting a good product but one that is coming from a Chinese company.
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Old 10-27-2020, 05:24 AM   #12
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I had excellent results from a set of Kelly Springfield tires, owned by Goodyear since the 1930's. No signs of unusual tread wear or sidewall checking after 52,000 miles and 9 years of service. Replaced last spring with a set from Uniroyal, owned by Michelin since the early 1990's.

Cost was substantial under (less than $275 each for 19.5" tires) what I would have paid for tires from the parent company while still taking advantage of the parent R&D efforts regarding wear, ride, fuel economy, noise reliability and other efforts to improve product performance.
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Old 10-27-2020, 08:01 AM   #13
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I had excellent results from a set of Kelly Springfield tires, owned by Goodyear since the 1930's. No signs of unusual tread wear or sidewall checking after 52,000 miles and 9 years of service. Replaced last spring with a set from Uniroyal, owned by Michelin since the early 1990's.

Cost was substantial under (less than $275 each for 19.5" tires) what I would have paid for tires from the parent company while still taking advantage of the parent R&D efforts regarding wear, ride, fuel economy, noise reliability and other efforts to improve product performance.
I bought Firestone FS561 tires for my motorhome. I used bead balancing and think they ride smooth, are quiet and look good. Only 5K miles so can't comment on longevity but their price was less the Yokohama, Sumotomo, Hankook etc.

Part of my decision was to find a quality American made tire. Firestone is a division of Bridgestone Americas, Inc. It is a subsidiary of Bridgestone a Japanese company. Most...maybe all...Bridgestone and Firestone commercial truck tires sold in North America are made in Tennessee. My Firestones say Made In USA right on the side! That may not be important to you but it is to me.

Although they might be quality tires I did not consider buying tires manufactured in China when there are several reasonably priced quality tire brands that are USA manufactured including Firestone, Uniroyal, Sumotomo, Yokohama, Toyo, etc.
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Old 10-27-2020, 12:30 PM   #14
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I suspect you'll find the graph(near bottom) in this NTSB pdf on Tire Aging and Service Life interesting.



Quote:
Originally Posted by CamJam1 View Post
Where are Sailuns made?
Truck tires Vietnam, auto tires China. The specs show they have the same construction as Michelin. I have 6 on our MH since 2017, IMO they perform as well or better than the Goodyear G670 they replaced, at 1/2 the cost. ($1,380 total)
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