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Old 08-01-2017, 07:21 AM   #15
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Polishing aluminum wheels???

For clarification, the Accu Shield wheels can not be polished with any form of grit compounds. Here's the label which identifies the Accu Shield. Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0839.JPG
Views:	192
Size:	459.9 KB
ID:	171041

For the question of do they hold up. NO.

The coating has a tendency to flake off and create a corrosion effect which cannot be polished out. I received 4 new warranty replacement for this reason.
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Old 08-01-2017, 07:32 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lass View Post
For clarification, the Accu Shield wheels can not be polished with any form of grit compounds. Here's the label which identifies the Accu Shield. Attachment 171041

For the question of do they hold up. NO.

The coating has a tendency to flake off and create a corrosion effect which cannot be polished out. I received 4 new warranty replacement for this reason.


How long is the warranty and who is it from?

WDK
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Old 08-01-2017, 07:41 AM   #17
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Polishing aluminum wheels???

The warranty is 5 years and comes directly from the manufacturer- Accu Ride. Here a photo of what may happen.

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0853.JPG
Views:	149
Size:	1.44 MB
ID:	171052

Since the wheels are manufactured by the same company, posts should reference if they are referring the Accu Ride or Accu Shield wheels. The 2 are different models by the same company.
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Old 08-01-2017, 08:03 AM   #18
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I have Accu Ride wheels 2 years old and though I have only used a mild soap to clean them, I did not know they were not supposed to be polished nor did any of my paper work, coach is new, tell me that they had a warranty.....I am glad this topic came up.

WDK
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Old 08-01-2017, 08:03 AM   #19
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Truck stop detailers

When i worked nights fueling trucks at a truck stop, we had a Truck washer and detailer. Many truck stops that are full service have either on staff or contractor/vendor detailers that wash, wax trucks, trailers and RV's and specialize in wheel polishing. They know exactly what to use on what type wheels and some offer a guarantee. It might be worth looking into if you don't have the time or knowledge. Type "wheel polishing" in a Google search for your area.
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Old 08-01-2017, 08:29 AM   #20
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I've used "Purple Metal Polish" for a couple years as recommended here on another thread. Google it and then read the reviews from Owners.

It's amazing and it works GREAT with little elbow grease.

Good luck!
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Old 08-01-2017, 08:37 AM   #21
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Just finished polishing the AccuRide wheels with Auto Sol polish. Worked very well.
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Old 08-01-2017, 12:17 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Mr_D View Post
Accuride is the brand name of one brand of wheels, it has nothing to do with whether coated or not. Accu-Shield are the Accuride brand coated ones that should never be polished.
Thanks Mr.D. I should have looked closer before replying
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Old 08-01-2017, 09:26 PM   #23
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Well,
The first thing that needs to be clarified is, contrary to popular belief, it's almost impossible to damage a clear coat on wheels that are coated from the factory. If it was that easy, regular washings, soap, auto cleaning supplies and more, with even the mildest of force, would damage them. NOT HAPPENING!!! I've been polishing aluminum now for about, 45 year or so. Those coatings from the factory are a Urethane base and are EXTREMELY STRONG. So, even if you do make a mistake and try to polish a coated wheel, unless you're using a grinder, nothing will happen.

There is no magic elixir to SHINY wheels. The ONLY way you get shiny wheels is pure LABOR, PERIOD!!!!!!!!!!! The first thing that needs to be determined is, what kind of condition the wheels are in prior to starting. That will determine which and what kind of compound/paste/liquid to be used and, whether or not a machine is to be use in conjunction with any of the above.

If wheels have been neglected and, are in poor shape, then the stronger compounds are needed to bring them around, so that less aggressive pastes and or liquids can be used to "fine tune" the shine. Can you use a finishing liquid or paste on a neglected wheel, sure you can. It will just take you decades longer to get what you'd achieve in one quarter the amount of time using the proper technique and compounds.

At present, I've got oh, around 6 or 7 different compounds, pastes and or rouges for aluminum. I use only soft cloths for application and, polishing. Now, also, once a wheel or set of wheels is polished to a mirror finish, depending on the conditions at which they are operated in or, what kind of weather they are subjected to, will determine just how long they will last, without any "touch-up".

Mine are polished to a mirror surface and, even though they get ran around the country every now and then and see all kinds of rain, mud, muck, dirt, debris, and more, they get a touch up about once a year and that brings them right back a mirror finish. And that process takes me about, 20-25 minutes per wheel. The coach is kept indoors in its own RV garage so, when it's not being used, the wheels are kept out of the weather.

It's all a matter of how much one wants to put into it, in order for the proper shine to appear. You can, and I've done this way more than I care to admit, bring aluminum to a shine that mimics CHROME! I have been asked many, many times by fellow Honda Goldwing riders, "where did you get your wheels chromed"? It still flatters me but, I tell them, they're NOT CHROME, just polished. You get out of it, what you put into it.
Scott

P.S.
I linked some photos of my highly polished wheels but, that P.O.S. Photobucket has apparently changed their rules about posting on forums. So, so much for those photos. I'll have to reorganize my photos to either store them on here or, something else.
Scott
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Old 08-01-2017, 10:06 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FIRE UP View Post
The first thing that needs to be determined is, what kind of condition the wheels are in prior to starting. That will determine which and what kind of compound/paste/liquid to be used and, whether or not a machine is to be use in conjunction with any of the above.
Hey FIRE UP...I'm serious...I was hoping you'd chime in here. I know how meticulous you are and I love that about you. You could be a real asset here to maybe teach us more of how to determine our wheels condition and then exactly what approach, compound/paste/liquids we should use to get our wheels back in shape, where we too, can stand back and be proud.

I would like to ask you—if you could and have the time—give us say.....for example...a 3 stage approach of what exactly you would recommend.

For example your suggestions could go something like this:
1) If your wheels are very tarnished and yellowing, the steps I would take and the compound/paste/liquids I would use would be....

2) If your wheels are just dull but you like to........the steps I would take and the compound/paste/liquids I would use would be....

3) If your wheels are fairly new and you'd like to keep them way........the steps I would take and the compound/paste/liquids I would use would be....

Or maybe even a 4th bit of information addressing what if your wheels are pitted, scratched or gouged.

I don't know FIRE UP, you fill in the blanks and title the different case scenarios as you see fit. But I know—after seeing the way you take care of your coach—we could all benefit from your experience.

Just thought I'd ask. If I'm out of line please forgive me.
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Old 08-02-2017, 09:00 PM   #25
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Hey Marjoa,
Thanks for the nice comments. You were pretty close in your "stages" of polishing. Aluminum is primarily a soft material. That is of course unless it's been treated in such a way that it's NOT soft. Some examples are 3003, 5052 and 6061-T-6. The first is primarily bubble gum aluminum. It's really malleable and scratches very easily. The 5052 is the middle of the grade chain and, is used in many applications for basic industrial support. The T-6 stuff is the bottom of the line in terms of Air craft quality aluminum. There's higher grades than that but, you get into exotic formulas and all that.
The wheels we all use and see on our coaches are a form of a mix of the 5052 and T-6. They need to be strong and hold their shape but, on the non-coated ones, they are soft enough to actually polish and that means, REMOVING material. But, due to the fact that they are that soft, on the surface anyways, it also means they're somewhat easily corrodible.
Metal, as in steel and cast iron, rusts. Aluminum corrodes. Same thing only different.

This brings me to the beginning of the polishing world. Most alloy wheels that come on the coaches we purchase, have a fair to mildly good polish on them from the factory. Not bad but, they can be improved on. If I had to guess, I'd say that more than 50% of the folks that purchase coaches with alloy wheels, NEVER TOUCH THEM for the entire amount of time, they own the coach. When that happens, THEY CORRODE, (unless coated). When that happens, they get dull because, just like what rust does to metal, it OXIDISES the surface.

And, the harsher the environment they're subjected to, the deeper the corrosion is, along with the time frame at which all this happens. By harsh environment, I'm talking a coach with un-coated wheels, living at or very near a beach. The salt air is ugly stuff. Running around back east during the snow and heavy ice season is not good too due to the SALT they use on the roads.

Now, all this leads up to, what kind of condition a set of wheels are in when one wants a mirror finish. Well, if you look at an alloy wheel and, it's pretty dull, but, with your thumb can almost bring a better surface, that's an easy fix. Some regular Mothers paste will do that wheel just fine. But, if you encounter a dull wheel and, no matter how much you rub your thumb on it, it remains dull, you'll have to get down and dirty with a bit more aggression.

There are rouges that are formulated for aluminum. They're formulated in different colors. Brown is normally for aluminum and White, for stainless steel. There's a green and a black too. I forgot what those are for. But, If you watch a pro, and they start with badly corroded wheels, it's highly possible that you'll see them use SAND PAPER on them.

I did. I had a set of GL 1500 Honda Goldwing wheels with 145,000 miles on them and, like stated earlier, they'd never been touched. I had to use 320 grit wet-or-dry to break down all the pits on them. Then, 400 grit, 600, 800, 1000 and finally 1200, all with tons of water to carry away the material. Then, I used a 3" tightly sewn cotton wheel on a 2500 rpm drill motor, along with the BROWN rouge.

That brought them back to the factory finish. I was not satisfied with that. I then used another, clean, cotton wheel with what's called "Semi-Chrome". It's a paste and, for the most part, produces enough of a shine that about 98% of the folks that use it are completely happy with the results. Not me. Once done with that process, I used what's called Zepher 40 and my finger with microfiber cloths. That process alone took me about two hours on each wheel.

All in all, with all the stages of process's, I had about 10 hours in EACH wheel. But, when they were done, they were as close to CHROME as they could get. It's all about breaking down the surface to a finer and finer finish. There are many recommendations as to what to use from folks on here and other RV forums. Different formulas and brands, are sold in different parts of the country. But, for the basics, the brown rouge can be bought at many auto paint supply stores and a few other specialty hardware stores.

As for the pastes and liquids, those too are easily purchased it many auto parts stores, specialty auto paint stores, detail shops and more. Good quality microfiber cloths or, any form of a cloth that is ultra soft is importance too.

Now, once a wheel is brought to the finish desired, it will last a long, long time without any maintenance. But, it's deceiving. You polish a wheel, and, you're real happy with it. So, you keep looking at it as time goes on and, it keeps looking good so, you don't mess with it. Pretty soon, a years gone by and, you THINK it's still good.

But, sit down and with a little Mothers, do a small section. WOW! you'll see that, it has corroded or, "oxidized" to a duller surface than you think. You hit those wheels with about 20 minutes of maintenance, once a year, and they will remain a mirror.
Scott
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Old 08-02-2017, 09:55 PM   #26
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My wheels have always been in pretty good shape but they look much better after some serious elbow grease. Mothers aluminum polish with the powerball on my drill and some finish work with a microfiber towel.
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Old 08-03-2017, 04:54 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FIRE UP View Post
Hey Marjoa,
Thanks for the nice comments. You were pretty close in your "stages" of polishing. Aluminum is primarily a soft material. That is of course unless it's been treated in such a way that it's NOT soft. Some examples are 3003, 5052 and 6061-T-6. The first is primarily bubble gum aluminum. It's really malleable and scratches very easily. The 5052 is the middle of the grade chain and, is used in many applications for basic industrial support. The T-6 stuff is the bottom of the line in terms of Air craft quality aluminum. There's higher grades than that but, you get into exotic formulas and all that.
The wheels we all use and see on our coaches are a form of a mix of the 5052 and T-6. They need to be strong and hold their shape but, on the non-coated ones, they are soft enough to actually polish and that means, REMOVING material. But, due to the fact that they are that soft, on the surface anyways, it also means they're somewhat easily corrodible.
Metal, as in steel and cast iron, rusts. Aluminum corrodes. Same thing only different.

This brings me to the beginning of the polishing world. Most alloy wheels that come on the coaches we purchase, have a fair to mildly good polish on them from the factory. Not bad but, they can be improved on. If I had to guess, I'd say that more than 50% of the folks that purchase coaches with alloy wheels, NEVER TOUCH THEM for the entire amount of time, they own the coach. When that happens, THEY CORRODE, (unless coated). When that happens, they get dull because, just like what rust does to metal, it OXIDISES the surface.

And, the harsher the environment they're subjected to, the deeper the corrosion is, along with the time frame at which all this happens. By harsh environment, I'm talking a coach with un-coated wheels, living at or very near a beach. The salt air is ugly stuff. Running around back east during the snow and heavy ice season is not good too due to the SALT they use on the roads.

Now, all this leads up to, what kind of condition a set of wheels are in when one wants a mirror finish. Well, if you look at an alloy wheel and, it's pretty dull, but, with your thumb can almost bring a better surface, that's an easy fix. Some regular Mothers paste will do that wheel just fine. But, if you encounter a dull wheel and, no matter how much you rub your thumb on it, it remains dull, you'll have to get down and dirty with a bit more aggression.

There are rouges that are formulated for aluminum. They're formulated in different colors. Brown is normally for aluminum and White, for stainless steel. There's a green and a black too. I forgot what those are for. But, If you watch a pro, and they start with badly corroded wheels, it's highly possible that you'll see them use SAND PAPER on them.

I did. I had a set of GL 1500 Honda Goldwing wheels with 145,000 miles on them and, like stated earlier, they'd never been touched. I had to use 320 grit wet-or-dry to break down all the pits on them. Then, 400 grit, 600, 800, 1000 and finally 1200, all with tons of water to carry away the material. Then, I used a 3" tightly sewn cotton wheel on a 2500 rpm drill motor, along with the BROWN rouge.

That brought them back to the factory finish. I was not satisfied with that. I then used another, clean, cotton wheel with what's called "Semi-Chrome". It's a paste and, for the most part, produces enough of a shine that about 98% of the folks that use it are completely happy with the results. Not me. Once done with that process, I used what's called Zepher 40 and my finger with microfiber cloths. That process alone took me about two hours on each wheel.

All in all, with all the stages of process's, I had about 10 hours in EACH wheel. But, when they were done, they were as close to CHROME as they could get. It's all about breaking down the surface to a finer and finer finish. There are many recommendations as to what to use from folks on here and other RV forums. Different formulas and brands, are sold in different parts of the country. But, for the basics, the brown rouge can be bought at many auto paint supply stores and a few other specialty hardware stores.

As for the pastes and liquids, those too are easily purchased it many auto parts stores, specialty auto paint stores, detail shops and more. Good quality microfiber cloths or, any form of a cloth that is ultra soft is importance too.

Now, once a wheel is brought to the finish desired, it will last a long, long time without any maintenance. But, it's deceiving. You polish a wheel, and, you're real happy with it. So, you keep looking at it as time goes on and, it keeps looking good so, you don't mess with it. Pretty soon, a years gone by and, you THINK it's still good.

But, sit down and with a little Mothers, do a small section. WOW! you'll see that, it has corroded or, "oxidized" to a duller surface than you think. You hit those wheels with about 20 minutes of maintenance, once a year, and they will remain a mirror.
Scott
Beautiful. Thanks FIRE UP for taking that time. I've added this to my bookmarks for future referral and to post to others when they ask.
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Old 08-03-2017, 08:42 PM   #28
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Marjoa,
You're most certainly welcome. Glad to help.

Relaxn,
Outstanding Sir. Yep, you can tell when someone's taken some pride in the way they want their wheels to look. By the way, since Photoshop has dumped all us normal humanoids from the ability to post pics, may I ask how you linked yours on here?
Scott
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