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Old 05-30-2021, 03:13 PM   #1
JDA
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Residential Refrigerator

I presently own a 2006 40 Country Coach with a Gas/ Electric Refrigerator.
I want to Upgrade to another Country Coach but 45 with 2 Recliners.
I believe that most all 45 Coaches are All Electric and that I would have to continually Run the Generator while Driving, Boondocking and Not Plugged In.
Please Advise!
Thank You
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Old 05-30-2021, 03:23 PM   #2
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Depends on battery capacity and inverter.

While driving the alternator should provide enough amps to power the refrigerator. With sufficient battery capacity you should be able to go ~8-10 hours without running generator. A lot will depend on other loads.
Most people say 2-4 hours of generator time when parked when running fridge. Run in in the AM to bring batteries up to charge and then before you go to bed.
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Old 05-30-2021, 04:22 PM   #3
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We put in a residential in ours when the Neved Cold gave up the ghost...luckily we caught it before it caught fire

Anyway we do not need to run gen while traveling. If we do it's for AC in hot climates

If boondocking we last over night and as stated above run gen to charge up in AM and PM

You shouldn't have an issue
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Old 05-30-2021, 05:51 PM   #4
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I sometimes in moments of euphoria, think that I want to go that route to a residential fridge as well. From what I've read on this site over the years, I am of the understanding that I'll need to add two to four dedicated batteries and a dedicated (2nd) inverter. My dilemma is, where do I put these four batteries and their added weight (@ 70 lbs or so each)? The second inverter might not be problem, though, installing it slightly above the Freedom inverter I already have.

Because we live in Florida, we often travel with the genny running to power up our a/c units, hot water heater and our Dometic absorption side by side fridge. As good as that fridge works, the ice cream doesn't get rock hard!!! It more importantly doesn't defrost itself either!! Imagine!!

I think if you have room for extra batteries, you shold go for it.

I think you should or could add auto- start for the generator if you don't already have it, so when your dedicated batteries run low while boondocking, they'll automatically restore their charge. A type of fool proof system, and it's not difficult to set up.

It's a great upgrade. Good luck to you and your endeavor.

Best regards,
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Old 05-30-2021, 06:16 PM   #5
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I installed a Samsung residential in my coach in late 2019 and had not given a good test. I agonized over extra batteries, separate inverter, and even more solar. I've decided to give it a test and see how it does.

In hot weather it's a no brainer since we run the generator for the AC's.

In the past in cooler climates where we didn't have to run the AC's we would usually have to run the generator 1-2 hours a day depending on what we were doing. Using TV's, electronics etc doesn't use much power. I did replace my fluorescent bulbs with LED which is a big energy saver.

So if I have to run the generator 1-2 hours more a day it's probably worth it.



If I have to do anything different I may install a small 1000 watt inverter just for the refrigerator and try it with the existing batteries. Newer inverters are more efficient and being able to shut the other off other then when I need something else to run would save batteries capacity.
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Old 05-30-2021, 06:35 PM   #6
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I am in the same boat as you as I just purchased my coach with a residential fridge in it. I have used it 2 trips but went to a RV park so no real challenge. This is my first dealing with 6 volt batteries as I have 4 trojans that are 7 years old and 100 watt of solar

In my yacht I have 3 -8D lifeline AGM batteries that work well as I have a Sub Zero fridge and separate Sub Zero freezer, a separate ice maker and a beer fridge down below. I typically turn the ice maker and beer fridge off at night and run the gen for about 3 hours in the AM and 4 hours before we go to bed
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Old 05-30-2021, 09:02 PM   #7
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We converted to a residential a number of years ago. Only have 2 8D house batteries and the full house inverter and have no problem at all. Lost the transfer switch and could not put power to anything with the generator (we were dry camped) for almost 72 hours, including the refer. Everything in the freezer was still frozen and the refer compartment was still within safe temp limits.

So, you do not need power to the refer 24/7 and turning it off during the night hours is a good option.


We have friends with al electric and they do run the generator if using the cook top and microwave at the same time.
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Old 05-30-2021, 09:19 PM   #8
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Solar is an option. My original battery bank was 4 coach and 2 starting. Switched to 6 coach/starting. 6v AGMs Series Parallel. Or back out the years to a 45' with an lp fridge.
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Old 05-30-2021, 10:22 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDA View Post
I presently own a 2006 40 Country Coach with a Gas/ Electric Refrigerator.
I want to Upgrade to another Country Coach but 45 with 2 Recliners.
I believe that most all 45 Coaches are All Electric and that I would have to continually Run the Generator while Driving, Boondocking and Not Plugged In.
Please Advise!
Thank You
Jim Andersen
I don't know why so many ran off on tangents about residential refer use and batteries. The coach you're looking at is designed to power the refer from an inverter while driving. No need to run the generator. As a matter of fact, it should be able to run almost 24 hours off the batteries before starting the generator.
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Old 05-31-2021, 12:53 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Dutch Star Don View Post
I don't know why so many ran off on tangents about residential refer use and batteries. The coach you're looking at is designed to power the refer from an inverter while driving. No need to run the generator. As a matter of fact, it should be able to run almost 24 hours off the batteries before starting the generator.
Don, thanks for raising this issue.

I don't mean to hijack this thread. But I think it would help the OP (and me) if someone explains how a residential fridge operates in a coach with an inverter. For example, a coach we are looking at has a residential fridge as an option that includes a 1200W inverter and two extra house batteries. What are the roles of the inverter and the two extra batteries 1) while driving, 2) while parked and hooked up to electricity, 3) while boondocking without running the generator, and 4) while boondocking and running the generator?

I think I know some of the answers, but I don't want to put out bad information if I'm wrong. So far, most of the advice I've heard says that to keep a residential fridge running while boondocking you should run the generator for about 4 hours a day (e.g., 2 hours in the morning and 2 hours in the evening).

How does the length of time the fridge remains powered depend on the size of the inverter, the number of house batteries, and the presence of solar panels? I recognize that it depends on other factors like the ambient external temperature, the number of hours the fridge has been running, whether it's been opened frequently, etc. But any approximations would be helpful.
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Old 05-31-2021, 03:23 AM   #11
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Residential refers require 110 volts AC. Not 12 volts DC and or propane.

To get that 110 volts you need a long enough extension cord to drive hundreds of miles.

Or you can run the onboard generator which eliminates the extension cord

Those are two of the 110 volt supply sources. If you are sitting with the engine of,f then your batteries 12 volts that is, can be used to convert/invert that DC voltage to AC voltage. At the same time it steps up the voltage to 110/120 whatever pops your corn term you like to use.

An inverter basically turns the DC on and off extremely rapidly thus creating a pulsing DC current and voltage. That quick change causes magnetic things to happen in transformers and they get excited and carry that excitement to the outlets.

The AC voltage in your house is like drinking pure water. The AC from an inverter is like drinking water that might be a bit cloudy. Drinkable but not the most pleasant. It may be good for cooking but just not palatable to drink.

So the term Pure Sine Wave inverter comes into play when discussing the magic boxes that take battery DC voltage and convert it to AC voltage.

Many appliances do not like the cloudy water and will get sick drinking it. They can let their internally stored smoke out and you need a new one thereafter.

The limits of this inverting systems is the size/capacity/and state of health of the buckets of marbles in the battery compartment. There are two banks of buckets. One to run the house side and one to run the normal engine/ car type functions.

The house batteries can only hold so many marbles before they do not like to play with the inverter and the inverter says go away and shut themselves off.
The more house batteries the more marbles you have to play with. Simple as that.

Before you say I have lost my marbles, hang in there a bit.

You need a way to get those marbles back into the batteries you lost playing keepsies with the inverter.

To refill the buckets you can use that same inverter/converter in many cases. That darn thing is pretty smart and has a split personality. Maybe because of all the lost marbles.

The converter portion of the crazy device can sense when you connect to shoreline. That is you have the fuel station plugged into the tank. That electron fuel comes in at 110 volts and feeds the converter. Watch carefully as I use the term converter and not inverter. They are confusing and often are used interchangeably.

The converter senses the 110 supply line and begins to produce marbles for the battery buckets. This production can fill the house batteries as well as the engine batteries depending on the design and state of repair of those systems.

The converter can be matched to various types of batteries and can often be adjusted to fill fast or slower depending on the fuel pump. (shoreline).

Ok, so the extension cord is just too heavy to haul and you drive off. There is that engine driven alternator just like any other vehicle you drive. It is like having an onboard fuel station, except it does NOT provide that pure 110 volts like the fuel station/shoreline does.

The alternator provides DC voltage. Ok, now all you techies out there do not admonish me for not being precise here. The DC supply from the alternator is just marbles the batteries like and you can fill those battery banks running down the road. Again, depending on the build of the chassis and status of it.

I have not mentioned solar but that is DC 12 volt option to fill those buckets as well.

Of course you can run the generator and the alternator running down the road and have lots of refill options.

To run a residential refer it takes 110 volts. How you get that has been explained. They like to use a fair amount so getting in flight refueling is a good thing. That is, the generator or alternator providing the refill.

As any good ice chest has insulation and can go hours more if left unopened you can drive for many hours without the refer turned on. They cool quickly and take the freezer down to subartic temps that requires a jackhammer to scoop ice cream.

The problem comes when you park without any refueling station available. You are now relying on just the batteries/buckets of electrons. You have a limited supply so how often you open the refer door (sounds familiar), how hot it is outside etc, will gauge how long it can keep things cozy until the batteries get too low to participate in the game.

If you boondock, then you either need to run a generator (a small one is often handy), to refill the batteries. A couple of hours in the am and pm for sure. You need to convert as many lights as possible to leds. You absolutely must become and energy manager.

Of course you can add all the batteries you can find room for but then you have to run the fuel station longer to fill them.

I used to use a Honda 1000 to keep my batteries up on our 42 footer. Turning the charger down kept the Honda happy and not overloaded. Quite and efficient.

If you do not boondock, and we do not any longer then you actually don't need as many batteries. I reduced my house batteries in half over a year ago.

I do NOT even have my refer on the inverter circuit, meaning I must run the generator for it to function or move the plug to the inverter in an emergency.

However, my inverter puts out the cloudy water type AC. It is not a pure sine wave model and could let the smoke out of my precious ice cream concrete maker. (I have to nuke the ice cream to scoop it)..


Inverters come in all sizes and shapes. They are only limited by your imagination and budget. Yes you could even run air conditioners but you would drain those battery buckets in just minutes for sure.

Thanks for listening.
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Old 05-31-2021, 03:24 AM   #12
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http://www.metrotrekkers.org/utility/electrical.htm

Here is a great site for playing with your electrical systems.
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Old 06-13-2021, 11:40 AM   #13
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How do you remove Samsung residential refrigerator from Aspire 2012
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Old 06-13-2021, 12:07 PM   #14
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How do you remove Samsung residential refrigerator from Aspire 2012
Remove the trim and retaining straps and slide it out. Unplug the power cord and disconnect the icemaker water line.

Exactly how you do that in an Aspire is a level of detail to be determined. Start taking it apart to see exactly how Entegra did those things.
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