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Old 11-03-2016, 09:26 AM   #71
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Originally Posted by ricardocana View Post
I would guess the majority of us shut the propane off at the tank
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Originally Posted by jstauf View Post
I just attended an RVing Women National Conference - there were several safety sessions.
1. All passengers should be seatbelted!
2. Never run the generator or propane while traveling - it's an explosion waiting to happen!!!
3. If you're cold - get a blanket or put on a sweatshirt.
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Originally Posted by gcsprayjr View Post
the RV industry does not advocate having the propane tanks on while driving.
There have been many injuries and loss of equipment due to propane related fires that have started while the RV was in motion.
If it were necessary/required to "turn the propane OFF while driving" thousands of propane powered school and public transportation buses, (and 3000+ Schwan's Home Service trucks), would be "dead in the water", (aka: useless).

Schwan's Home Service Runs 3,300 Propane-Powered Units Nationwide - Article - TruckingInfo.com

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Old 11-03-2016, 02:18 PM   #72
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That's exactly what I am talking about! WE had a lady coming up thr ramp to get on the highway and she pulled right in front of us! SHE must have wanted to be in front of us, and not in back. THANK God for air brakes!
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Old 11-03-2016, 02:31 PM   #73
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I have sat up in front quite a bit, and when I do it, it's usually on a highway that does not have tons of traffic, and I do enjoy it. I put my recliner on and enjoy the scenery. IT'S when we get to metropolitan areas, and heavy traffic, my stomach goes in knots! I made a deal with my hubby, that if I just get up and go in back, call me if you need me. it's better for him, and much better for me. THANK you for yor encouragement . maybe the more I do it, the more I will relax. this was our maiden voyage with something so big, we had a 28ft, that we used for camping weekends, we have never taken it cross country like we did with this one, and never towed a car. it's a lot of getting g used too.
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Old 11-03-2016, 04:50 PM   #74
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I hope you can get used to riding up front in traffic. We are new to it as well, and so far I have done all the driving with my wife in the passenger seat. Her help has been invaluable, ESPECIALLY in traffic. She can keep an eye out for things that I can't, because I'm still getting used to driving it. The driver has serious information overload going on, and having an extra pair of eyes is important.

My wife wants to drive, we just haven't had the chance for her yet. That will come next week.

Funny thing, the Subaru is also new to us and it's a 5-speed. She is just learning to drive it and is far more nervous about driving it than the motorhome! But she's doing great.
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Old 11-03-2016, 07:14 PM   #75
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Mel, Sorry. But that is an apples-to-oranges comparison. Of course propane-fueled engines have to have the propane on. The propane items being discussed here are auxiliary functions, not the main drive system.

I do agree with you that generators can be safely run while driving. Cooking with propane is probably a no-no, since the cook would have to be up and at the stove/oven while the rig was in motion. Well, I guess one could put a roast in the gas oven. But, I would rather try a slow-cooker roast with the cooker plugged in and setting in the sink. The cooker could be set up before the drive, and possibly be done at the end of the run. The aroma might make one a bit hungry later in the day.

The concern that I have is with propane powered fridges. Don't they really need to be very level to run correctly? What about driving up and down hills, entrance/exit ramps, etc.? I would think that might be a problem. But, you did state that you have run over 120K+ miles with the Norcold running and no problems. I will defer to your actual experience. At this point, I have no personal experience with this issue, yet. Thank you. However, I am leaning toward possibly replacing a propane fridge with a residential fridge in whatever Class A we eventually acquire.

The last two test drives that DW and I took were in the hot summer. The salesman had the generator running the A/C on both rigs during the drives. There was no way the dash A/C could keep the entire rig cool in 90+ degree heat.

And, I could see where running the furnace in cold driving weather would be preferred.
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Old 11-03-2016, 09:46 PM   #76
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Fortunately bad things never happen

This thread contains the scariest collection of bad advice I have ever seen in one place.

Hmmm

Assumes that the '60's safety regulations for cars were just a bad idea in toto, since only careless people crash.

Has no fear of propane in a system, designed for a back yard barbecue, weathering a collision at highway speed ,and assumes that carbon monoxide just doesn't exist, if you look the other way .

and feels passing out intoxicated in the back the best way to relieve the headaches and irritability of travel ( as well as CO poisoning).

I'm glad you guys don't work on airplanes.
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Old 11-03-2016, 11:20 PM   #77
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Mel, Sorry. But that is an apples-to-oranges comparison. Of course propane-fueled engines have to have the propane on. The propane items being discussed here are auxiliary functions, not the main drive system.

I do agree with you that generators can be safely run while driving. Cooking with propane is probably a no-no, since the cook would have to be up and at the stove/oven while the rig was in motion. Well, I guess one could put a roast in the gas oven. But, I would rather try a slow-cooker roast with the cooker plugged in and setting in the sink. The cooker could be set up before the drive, and possibly be done at the end of the run. The aroma might make one a bit hungry later in the day.

The concern that I have is with propane powered fridges. Don't they really need to be very level to run correctly? What about driving up and down hills, entrance/exit ramps, etc.? I would think that might be a problem. But, you did state that you have run over 120K+ miles with the Norcold running and no problems. I will defer to your actual experience. At this point, I have no personal experience with this issue, yet. Thank you. However, I am leaning toward possibly replacing a propane fridge with a residential fridge in whatever Class A we eventually acquire.

The last two test drives that DW and I took were in the hot summer. The salesman had the generator running the A/C on both rigs during the drives. There was no way the dash A/C could keep the entire rig cool in 90+ degree heat.

And, I could see where running the furnace in cold driving weather would be preferred.
The manual for my lp/electric refrigerator says to turn off the refrigerator before filling the gas tank. This to ensure the refrigerator does not ignite the petrol fumes in the area. It also says because of the movement of the refrigerator while traveling, I dont need to keep the refrigerator level.

Now let say that I am in an accident with the propane turned on. The propane line is broke and propane is free flowing. Is there not a check valve that is engaged when there is no/little back pressure in the the propane line? Reference Propane 101-The basics
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Old 11-04-2016, 03:50 AM   #78
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Don't feel alone. When we bought our Class A 17 years ago, as we left the dealer and headed toward the first bridge, my wife FREAKED proclaiming "YOU"RE GOING TO HIT THAT BRIDGE AND KILL ALL OF US" as she ran to the rear of our MH!!!!
Same with us but the bridge had a low guard rail and was fairly high above the river for commercial fishing boat clearance. Being only two lanes and her first time in the seat didn't help either.

90% of the time I drive and until the first time the Navigator and I swapped places I never realized just how close it appears and that any minute from now the coach is to going off the side of the road or about to take out a string of mail boxes. Using the mirror I can see the edge of the road on the right side and know I'm fairly close and OK but not the Navigator.

It takes time getting used to the different prospective. Find something to keep your mind busy and attention away from the perceived danger. Give it time but until then be safe while rolling down the road.
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Old 11-04-2016, 04:10 AM   #79
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Running the fridge while moving is not a problem. Movement of the vehicle counteracts any problems caused from being unlevel. Furnaces are not designed to be operated while moving. Air movement across the intake and exhaust of the furnace disrupts the balance of the fuel to air ratio inside of the heat exchanger. What is recommended is to either operate the generator and run a rooftop heat pump, or the roof top ac with heat strips. On high end rigs there are auxiliary heaters that produce heat from engine coolant circulated just like the dash heat, only on a much larger scale. Retrofitting a motorhome with these types of heaters is not expensive and will provide economical safe heat while traveling. They require no extra fuel consumption, just 12 volt power to operate the fans. School buses use these types of heaters. You can buy the heaters as a kit. Built in generators and refrigerators are the only two gas powered RV appliances that are actually designed to be able to operate while in motion. Stoves, water heaters, and furnaces are not designed to operated unless the vehicle is stationary. On coaches with diesel generators the units are designed to operate almost continuously. Check the oil before your trip, start the unit and run it for the duration. You only need to shut it down when fueling. Of course it is a good idea to visually inspect the unit and check the oil anytime the unit is turned off. The disadvantage of a house type refrigerator in a motorhome is obvious. Besides lack of vibration resistance, they don't have door locks, or other features of an RV specific unit. It is comparable to the fellow who hangs a window ac in the side of the RV when the roof mounted unit goes bad. You might be able to use a very large power inverter and operate a house type fridge off of the engine's electrical system, however it will put a significant strain on the alternator. In a park model RV that never moves a house refrigerator makes sense.
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Old 11-04-2016, 05:09 AM   #80
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Stoves, water heaters and furnaces run on days with strong winds and storms, so why wouldn't they run in the man made wind of driving.

You say the fridge is ok to run, going down the road. What is different about that flame, compared to the other appliances. The fridge is the smallest, easiest to blow out flame.
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Old 11-04-2016, 07:01 AM   #81
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I'm glad you guys don't work on airplanes.



You're making way too many assumptions in your first post........

I do work on airplanes!
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Old 11-04-2016, 08:09 AM   #82
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If you don't turn on your propane while driving you can plan on everything in your refrigerator and freezer spoiling byt the time you get to your far-away destination. Wive's tale!
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Old 11-04-2016, 08:28 AM   #83
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If keep reading this thread for some reason........ I just have to post a few thoughts at this point, even though I keep saying to myself not to.

We both drive the coach. And I can't image being in a situation where one of us is so miserable when traveling we have to sleep when going down the road - seems to be destined to not being a good RV experience to me......

You should always wear a seat belt, sitting in a proper upright position. Sitting in a significantly reclined position with a seat belt on is not much better, if any, than not wearing one at all. We are not so paranoid as to not get up occasionally to use the head, get a snack, etc. when we feel it is reasonably safe to do so.

2 people paying attention, helping to navigate, etc. in the front is better than just the driver. We are always both up front, seat belts on, although on occasion the passenger may take a quick snooze, read, etc. on open interstate.

Chances are if you get in an accident in an RV, you are going to be the "big dog" in the fight, and as such, chances serious injury is probably pretty slim, particualy if you are properly seated and belted in. Not so much for the person in the sub compact......

However, if you get in a serious accident, particularly in a ClassA, you probably have a high likelihood of being seriously injured or killed, whether you are belted in or not. If not by your knees being a defacto front bumper in a Class A, but stuff flying around from cabinets, and for those that are "safely" buckled in on the couch or dinette also getting crushed by the refrigerator when it breaks loose.

On the other hand, chances are you are not going to die or be seriously injured any more than being belted in if you are sleeping while the coach is going down the road. I mean really........ However, in tour busses where people are often sleeping while traveling, the beds run front/rear, head towards the rear, so in the very rare chance you are in an accident, you don't shorten your spine 2" when your head hits the wall.

Many ClassA coaches for some time now, come with residential refrigerators, which work just fine running off inverters when traveling, and most, if not all, have some sort of latching device added to keep the doors shut.

We turn off the propane when traveling because there is no reason not to for us with a residential fridge. As far as using a propane stove while traveling, well, people do it on boats all the time. Yes, they usually have some sort of clamps etc. to hold pots and pans in place. Not sure why we would use the stove while traveling, but you never know.

However, when driving in below frezzing temps, people run thier popane furnaces all the time, as many times it is the only way to get heat in the wet bays to keep them from freezing up. I have not heard of any anecdotal stories where this resulted in any fire, CO poisoning, etc. We have not had a reason to do this......

Ok, got that off my chest.
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Old 11-04-2016, 08:41 AM   #84
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Mel, Sorry. But that is an apples-to-oranges comparison.
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re: message #71
I posted that propane powered vehicle information, (not as a comparison), but to illustrate the FACT that driving any motor vehicle with an on-board propane tank... while the on-board propane tank is TURNED ON... is NEITHER DANGEROUS or ILLEGAL.
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