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Old 10-09-2018, 02:10 PM   #1
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UPDATE: What is the max temp for the Michelin 255/80522.5?

I want to thanks everyone for their input on the original post but no one really answered the question.

No where in any posted tire company literature is specific heat number addressed, to include Michelin. The problem I have with TMPS is they preset a tire heat alarm at 158 degrees.

I just talked at length with a Michelin Technician for almost 45 minutes. We covered my DP specifically.

4 Corner Weight Winnie PSI Chart Chart PSI Set PSI
FL 2850
FR 3850 3875 70 80
RL 7500
RR 7900 8080 85 95

The reason I set my PSI 10 lbs higher was my comfort in driving the DP. At lowest setting handled great but felt better at higher PSI.

Michelin Tech said no max heat number set for the XRV but there is a cautionary HIGH PSI reading that indicates danger. THe Tech stated we should never allow PSI to rise 20 PSI higher than the cold PSI.

Michelin's advice is check your tire pressure instead of worrying about tire temp. (Having said that, no externally mounted TMPS that I reviewed actually measured the temp of the inside of the tire.)

I've RVed since 1974 with multiple MH and TT. Only had 2 flat tires. One on TT and one on MH. TT flat was caused by road debris which I could not escape. The MH was the result of the metal valve stem on the outside dully had come loose allowing air to escape. It was fine when I stopped half-hour earlier for fuel and something to eat in the restaurant. Always wondered if those parked beside the MH and kept spouting obscenities as wife and I got is and pulled out didn't loosen it since it was on their side but could have just been a faulty valve stem adjustment. Will never know.)

All said: I don't see any since in spending money for an infrared unit to measure tire heat when PSI is the key. Since my front tires are set at 80 PSI that means if I see my PSI getting close to 100 which would indicate a tire temp well below the 158 normally set with TMPS.

Based on the info I'd found I will continue to drive keeping my eye on the PSI. I may decide to get a TMPS since my DP didn't come with a working unit to make it easier to check the tire PSI.

Hope this helps with those like me that were terribly confused by the constant reference to tire temp without a specific setting or manufacturer reference.

Drive safe - Richard

I need to stop and get things checked out. If we use the formula that for every 10 degrees in temp change results in a 2 PSI change then
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Old 10-09-2018, 02:17 PM   #2
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I have a non-contact infrared thermometer. I check tire pressure every morning with a gauge. When we're on the road I check tire temps at each stop. As long as I don't find one significantly warmer than the rest I don't worry about the actual reading.
I have noticed that the inside duals run 12 to 15 degrees warmer than the outers. I attribute it to reduced airflow along with radiant heat from the rotors.
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Old 10-09-2018, 02:52 PM   #3
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If you talk to a different tech, you might get a different story. When I spoke with Michelin a couple years ago he said a 15% rise in pressure is normal for a properly inflated tire with a load on it. I get a 12-15% increase in pressure if the OAT remains the same. As the day goes on with increasing OAT, the pressure goes up too. The increase from temperature is 2% for each 10*. (not 2 psi) So if the OAT is 40* warmer at mid day than it was at 6am, the pressure will be 8.25 psi higher without turning a wheel if the pressure was 100 psi @ 6am. Now add 15% more for the safe running pressure for the loaded tire. When I check with my infrared gun, the inside dual will only be a 5-7* warmer than the outer one.
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Old 10-09-2018, 09:00 PM   #4
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Factory default setting for EEZtpms is 158 degrees F. Their instruction state that depending on the tire, you can expect a rise from ambient of 5 to 25%. Further, they say you will determine if you need to RAISE your max temp after your first few rides.

You really don't know to know the maximum temp that your tire can withstand - what you need is to understand that abnormal temps should cause you to stop and inspect BEFORE a total failure.

I've run mine at 158 degrees F and have had no problems or temperature alarms. I do know that if my temp goes above that, I have a problem that I've got to fix.
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Old 10-10-2018, 12:32 PM   #5
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You should watch the tire pressure and temp for an average. Once you establish an average you will know how to set your alarms. The main issue with monitoring temp and pressure is when you see one tire much higher or lower than the others. Then you know you should check it out. Then you know you can set the alarms to notify you when things are out of wack. The alarms should notify you before things go south.
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Old 10-10-2018, 10:55 PM   #6
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Tires melt over 1,112 degrees F - so I'd want to stay a little below that...
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Old 10-11-2018, 12:14 AM   #7
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AITG said:

"I have noticed that the inside duals run 12 to 15 degrees warmer than the outers. I attribute it to reduced airflow along with radiant heat from the rotors"

I've been checking my temps every time I stop for the last 10 years or so. I've never seen more than about four degrees difference from inner to out and that was caused by the sun.

One time it was quite a difference and I discovered the cause was a loss of air on one of the duals.

So I'm curious if your rear duals are all at the same pressure and are you diesel or gas?
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Old 10-11-2018, 02:58 PM   #8
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I mostly agree with the Michelin tech, though I would not take the 20 psi verbatim. It's more like 20% above the max load cold inflation, and even that is just a warning threshold.



The most useful thing to do with temperature is as Quincy suggests: establish what is a typical or normal range and look for problems in any tires gets beyond that. The elevated temperature serves as a clue that something is going wrong, even though the tire itself is probably still safe at that temperature.
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Old 10-11-2018, 03:50 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arch Hoagland View Post
AITG said:

"I have noticed that the inside duals run 12 to 15 degrees warmer than the outers. I attribute it to reduced airflow along with radiant heat from the rotors"

I've been checking my temps every time I stop for the last 10 years or so. I've never seen more than about four degrees difference from inner to out and that was caused by the sun.

One time it was quite a difference and I discovered the cause was a loss of air on one of the duals.

So I'm curious if your rear duals are all at the same pressure and are you diesel or gas?
Gas engine, disc brakes. I also removed and discarded the wheel covers to get more air flow.
I suspect the rotors are radiating heat directly into the steel rims. I run 82 psi in all six tires.
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Old 10-12-2018, 03:24 PM   #10
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The higher the temperature the tires are run at the quicker they will fail. You don't see a great amount of failures on MH's as they just don't travel a lot of miles. You will not see an owner/operator over the road trucker running/operating with above normal tire temperatures, hired driver who knows
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Old 10-14-2018, 08:20 AM   #11
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Crasher

My mistake. Reviewed notes and sure enough I had written 2% instead of 2 PSI

Thanks for pointing that out.

Richard
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