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Old 01-27-2021, 10:17 AM   #15
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Rickemo; good info. That is what I saw after looking at the video previously posted. After watching the video it explained the crimping procedure as to the strain relief on the insulation. Now I understand the problems I've had using the single crimper I've used for years.
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Old 01-27-2021, 10:21 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Jzack View Post
Lots of great info here. I've been using the "absolute worst" single indent manual crimper for almost 25 years but with very few failed connections. If there is a problem it is usually from moisture getting inside the crimp. I do have a hydraulic crimper with dies that I use for large gauge wire but it is too big for small jobs.

A trick I've learned is to strip back twice as much wire as necessary and fold it back on itself. This makes it far easier to totally fill the void in the connector before crimping. After the crimp, always give it a good tug to make sure it's tight. Done. It does take strong hands though so the ratcheting style crimper the OP mentioned looks like a good option for aging hands.
Ditto on the good info posted...

Also, ditto that I have been using a simple 3 cavity, manual crimper forever, on 10 to 22 gauge wire connectors...

I always use quality Anchor marine grade connectors, since most of my crimping was done on boats/cars/motorcycles..

I have installed everything from water pumps, to radar units, to radios (am/fm & VHF), and inverters on my boats... all small gauge wires crimped with my old trusty single detent crimper... I never had a wiring issue on anything I've installed over the years... I must have been lucky..

I have a large ratchet crimper I bought when I installed my inverter.. It has dies for 6 gauge (bonding wires) up to/including 4/0 for the inverter cable and marine battery cable runs..

These smaller ratcheting style crimpers are intriguing...

Looks like I need to try the same style crimpers for my smaller wire connectors too..
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Old 01-27-2021, 10:37 AM   #17
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This is my .02, and your results may vary. I have the ratcheting type crimpers for both the nylon and shrink fit connectors. I have pretty good hand strength, yet I find the ratcheting style a PITA to work with.

I use exclusively a small set of Knipex parallel jaw pliers to set my crimps. Same crimp as the ratcheting style but much less hand effort required and much more compact. The Knipex parallel jaw pliers have two flat smooth surfaces that close in a parallel fashion just like the ratcheting crimpers.

I also use shrink fit connectors whenever I can. Not that I think it helps that much with moisture, after all the connector end is open, but that the shrink grips the insulation of the wire.

I ran pull tests on connectors attached with the ratcheting style, and my Knipex technique. Real simple if you want to compare techniques. Put one technique on one end of a short wire, and the other technique on the other end. Clamp one end in the vise, and grab the other end with pliers and pull until one gives. Tells you pretty fast which crimp is superior. I call it my redneck pull tester.

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Old 01-27-2021, 11:02 AM   #18
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I have been using the same style crimper as you for a while now.

One other big improvement that I found a couple of years ago is crips with built in heat shrink. Sure it is overkill in some applications but helpful in the rest.

Here is an example, https://www.amazon.com/Qibaok-Connec...s%2C279&sr=8-4
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Old 01-27-2021, 11:06 AM   #19
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I noticed in the video she had to use the table for leverage with the ratcheting style crimper. Hmmm, not sure that would work for repairs in tight spots in the RV at the campground. Another issue, it looks like they have a stopper that stops the crimp jaws at the same spot every time. Not sure that would work when trying to repair existing wiring or odd connectors that may not match exactly what the crimpers was designed for.

Bottom line, they probably work great for building widgets in a shop, and they look like a fine tool but out in the field with all the variables involved in repair work, I think I'll stick with my trusty single indent crimpers for now. BTW, I love the redneck pull test idea. I'll have to try that sometime.
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Old 01-27-2021, 11:13 AM   #20
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If you are talking about crimping butt connectors and such, these are the best I have found. I have tried many types and these take the cake. The connector sits down in a cut out and when you squeeze, it really crimps it.
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Old 01-27-2021, 11:22 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jzack View Post
Lots of great info here. I've been using the "absolute worst" single indent manual crimper for almost 25 years but with very few failed connections. If there is a problem it is usually from moisture getting inside the crimp. I do have a hydraulic crimper with dies that I use for large gauge wire but it is too big for small jobs.

A trick I've learned is to strip back twice as much wire as necessary and fold it back on itself. This makes it far easier to totally fill the void in the connector before crimping. After the crimp, always give it a good tug to make sure it's tight. Done. It does take strong hands though so the ratcheting style crimper the OP mentioned looks like a good option for aging hands.
Sorry jack, I have to disagree. If you need to double the wire then you need a smaller terminal. JMO.

I've used the anvil ratcheting crimpers for years. Started when I was working on the busses in Australia and just keep on. They are not cheap and some take good hand strength but they sure make a good crimp.

The cheap punch through types do a poor job and I have no idea how many I've seen fail due to that system.
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Old 01-27-2021, 11:43 AM   #22
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for general auto work I use this, I also have many other laying around.

https://www.amazon.com/Tool-Aid-1896...83&s=hi&sr=1-9
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Old 01-27-2021, 12:13 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Mile Marker 42 View Post
If you are talking about crimping butt connectors and such, these are the best I have found. I have tried many types and these take the cake. The connector sits down in a cut out and when you squeeze, it really crimps it.

Those look exactly like the ones I've been using for many years, without any issues...

For some reason I thought they had 3 cavities/cut outs, I see now they only have two...

Many years ago I started using them on aluminum sleeves when crimping mono fishing leaders or wire leaders.... They crimped so well, I bought another set and started using them for my electrical crimping...
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Old 01-27-2021, 12:16 PM   #24
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That is exactly what I use, only Channel Lock brand. If water proofing is needed, I use liquid tape at the ends of the barrel crimp.
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Old 01-27-2021, 12:40 PM   #25
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Wire end Crimpers - What do you USE?

Simple but actually not. -

I'm the owner of a 2005 Coach - over the years it has had numerous issue with electrical connections - I carry all the tools to make repairs - Multi meter - Test Light - Replacement ends - Wire stripper - and a Crimper.

My weak link seems to be the Crimper - for years I've just used what I'll call the "Cheap" single crimp - non ratcheting - almost always fails crimper.

Last summer while on the road, I was repeatedly repairing all the old previously repaired connections - Soldered most of them but not all. I got to thinking - there has to be a quicker way to make these connections work.

So in a search i found that there is a Ratcheting Crimper (Actually there are many) - being that these old Hands just don't get them Tight, they might be the solution to my problem. -

So the simple Question - if you use a Ratcheting Crimper - Which One is Will Work?

This is my choice - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...YTXHYQ2K&psc=1

Good or Bad ??? All suggestions welcome couple things that I usually think hard about - Cost - Good Reviews - Works. -

TIA
I'm not wiring the space shuttle, so I have the same crimpers you bought from Amazon. Most of the connectors I use are the red, yellow and blue sleeve size. I have other pairs for other connectors that I may use.
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Old 01-27-2021, 12:58 PM   #26
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Good choice on style of crimper.

Used one to completely wire all the aircraft electrical and Avionics connections in the plane in my avatar and in rewiring the aircraft in my signature. Never a problem in either.

I have been using it also to replace several old poorly done and poor quality connectors on my bus.

I suggest this one>>>https://www.steinair.com/product/rat...er-frame-only/

With these jaws>>>https://www.steinair.com/product/ins...inal-die-only/

They cost a bit more but much better quality and precision.

The second component of this problem is, however, the quality of the connectors. Use good grade aviation connectors.
Search this site for the size/style connectors you need>>>>
https://www.steinair.com/product/14-...e-butt-splice/

I would also consider ordering this>>>>https://www.steinair.com/product/ter...it-450-pieces/

It should cover most, if not all of your connection needs.

With these crimpers, jaws, and connectors you will get good gas tight connections.

These links connect you to a supplier that has the products that conform to the requirements that I outlined n my previous post. Nylon insulation with insulation support sleeves, mil-spec butt connectors etc.
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Old 01-27-2021, 01:18 PM   #27
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For general purpose butt connector type crimping I've had a pair of these Thomas and Betts hand crimpers in my box for 40 some years. Never had a wire crimp fail. Yes, I've tried the ratcheting type and know all about wire strain and over crimping consequences, but they're not very easy to operate in real world working conditions. The most important factor in any wire crimping is matching terminal size to wire gauge and not over/under crimping the connection. Yes, these are not Harbor Freight priced, but they'll last a lifetime.
https://www.mscdirect.com/browse/tnp...20-%20Supplier
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Old 01-27-2021, 01:41 PM   #28
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As far as the ratcheting crimper being easier on the hands, that is not necessarily the case. I have a ratcheting crimper which does a great job, but it takes all my strength to use it and puts a lot of stress on these old hands. Maybe there is another brand around which has more mechanical advantage and is easier to use, but mine is a bear to squeeze.

The main advantage to me of a ratcheting crimper is that you can't make a bad connection from under-crimping, because the ratchet will not release until the proper amount of force has been applied.
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