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Old 01-21-2020, 09:11 AM   #71
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Our coach has PEX plus white reinforced flexible lines in a few locations - a short section on each side of the pump, from the toilet down through the floor and from the fill port to the water tank because the port is on a slide-out. Only one minor issue but the coach is pretty new. That issue was when the tank fill line got pinched by the slide & I couldn't fill the tank. I re-positioned the line & it hasn't happened again.

If I ever had to replace plumbing lines, I wouldn't hesitate to do it myself. Not plumbing lines but I replaced the two handle shower faucet with a single handle model.
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Old 01-21-2020, 10:00 AM   #72
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I used Sharkbite brass CRIMP fittings throughout my coach, none leaked--they are an excellent product in my judgment. Another Sharkbite product offering is the Sharkbite brass PUSH-ON fitting, which I suspect Mark might be referring to, as he mentions O-rings, which are not part of the Sharkbite crimp-fitting system--I don't know exactly what system Mark used. Maybe Mark can confirm whether he is referring to PUSH-ON fittings, and whether they were brass, poly or something else--maybe I just didn't see it in his post. Sharkbite PEX crimp fittings are so simple, it's what polybutylene tried unsuccessfully to do years ago. No, I have nothing to do with Sharkbite--I just did a complete re-plumb, and the stuff worked great. I like the crimp fittings because they are so tight, and thus guard against leakage even though subject to vibrations on the road. My motorcycle uses similar crimp fittings. Easy and cheap. I would not use--did not use--the PUSH-ON fittings, as I cannot imagine they'd hold up after thousands of miles of vibration, but I don't know, I don't have experience with push-on fittings.



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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark_K5LXP View Post
When I was remodeling the bathrooms in my S&B house I used a few sharkbite fittings as temporary connections until I had time to re-route and make permanent PEX runs. Out of just a handful that I used, one of them leaked. When you read the fine print on these things the pipe end prep is critical. In the real world, you don't always get perfectly controlled conditions of access, pipe condition or careful preparation that these things require. Strike two is that these things rely on an o-ring seal and while o-rings work great, they don't last forever. After enough time and exposure to chemicals in the water they'll deform, get stiff, degrade, and will ultimately stop sealing. I recall these fittings are warranted for 30 years and even if they lasted that long, what happens then? You're going to tear out walls and cabinets to replace them? Or better yet, discover where they are by the water damage and make a warranty claim for a six dollar fitting? Contrasted to a sweated copper, or PEX expansion connection that has no expiration. In an RV application, are these things up to flexing and vibration year after year? No thank you, I fortunately learned the easy way that these things are not for permanent installations. They're very handy for temporary jobs and quick fixes but I would NEVER put one in somewhere I couldn't access it. Those in the trades I'm sure could point out the error of my ways but if their application and use is so critical that someone like myself that's quite meticulous about everything I do can't get it right, then it's certainly not something I would trust to consumer use and especially not in a mobile environment.

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Old 01-22-2020, 11:21 AM   #73
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I've always thought of "Shark Bite" being synonymous with the "push on" fittings, which I think others do also. Thanks for clarifying that.

I've always favored the crimp on fittings too, and they have always worked well for me, whether Shark Bite or something else.

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Old 01-22-2020, 12:07 PM   #74
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Polyethylene Tubing and PVC should never be confused with PEX.
90% of today's RVs are plumbed with this and Flair-It compression fittings. Take this for what it's worth, from a good plumber friend with 40+ years in the trade..."never use Sharkbite or any of that big box store "pex" junk". He makes really good money ripping this stuff out all the time. So does Servpro mopping up the mess.
So twenty some years ago I started using what he recommended, the original PEX, Wirsbo (now Uponor). Have plumbed two houses and our new shop, no drips or leaks and inexpensive once you make the investment in the expander tool. Yes, you have to purchase it at a plumbing supply house. Know what they don't sell? The junk they sell for big money at those big box stores. Just because it's "plastic fantastic" doesn't make it "PEX". Would I use real PEX on an RV? Not likely unless it was a new build. Personally I like the poly/pcv tubing with Flare-It compression fittings on the RV. Cheap and easy to work with and replace.
So before you decide to use "PEX" do your homework and learn the difference between grades of product.
It's good education.
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Old 01-23-2020, 10:51 AM   #75
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpine36 View Post
Polyethylene Tubing and PVC should never be confused with PEX.
90% of today's RVs are plumbed with this and Flair-It compression fittings. Take this for what it's worth, from a good plumber friend with 40+ years in the trade..."never use Sharkbite or any of that big box store "pex" junk". He makes really good money ripping this stuff out all the time. So does Servpro mopping up the mess.
So twenty some years ago I started using what he recommended, the original PEX, Wirsbo (now Uponor). Have plumbed two houses and our new shop, no drips or leaks and inexpensive once you make the investment in the expander tool. Yes, you have to purchase it at a plumbing supply house. Know what they don't sell? The junk they sell for big money at those big box stores. Just because it's "plastic fantastic" doesn't make it "PEX". Would I use real PEX on an RV? Not likely unless it was a new build. Personally I like the poly/pcv tubing with Flare-It compression fittings on the RV. Cheap and easy to work with and replace.
So before you decide to use "PEX" do your homework and learn the difference between grades of product.
It's good education.
A plumber friend of mine told me that was all he used also, so I bought the Milwaukee battery powered tool kit at Home Depot for $400.00 and plan to re-plumb our house with ProPEX. The hand tool is around $100.00, but I thought the power tool would be better/faster for the house. I think ProPEX also bends more/better than the regular PEX, at least that's what they advertise.

That said, I have not had any problems with the crimp on PEX I've installed at the house or in our TCs or MHs. I've also never had any problems with the grey stuff. I only replaced it by splicing with PEX to make changes. All our RV's are between 25 and 30 years old, including the TC when we sold it.

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Old 01-23-2020, 06:10 PM   #76
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We only have the super pex up here in Canada at the bix box stores.
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Old 01-23-2020, 08:27 PM   #77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryqster View Post
Absolutely correct. The crimp clamps are still being used by manufacturers. My Arctic Fox 2018 has both PEX style compression fittings as well as some crimp type ring fittings...which I hate by the way!!!
Here's how I did mine and it worked out really well. I use both the proper pex crimp rings and also the bands in certain areas like on my pump. The rubber lines isolate the pump noise so much that it's very hard to hear. You have to really listen for it and even then you're not sure it's running. I also found not tightening the pump screws fully tight made a huge difference.

In my pick you can see the clear tubing - that's going to a 2 gallon accumulator mounted in the next bay. Also, those flex lines going to the pump make it MUCH easier to remove the pump.
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Old 01-29-2020, 04:25 PM   #78
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The braided vinyl hose

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Originally Posted by steve52 View Post
You got that right... It's reinforced braided vinyl tubing. Surprised any manufacturer would use it. Wonder if a previous owner made some repairs?
They may have used the reinforced braided vinyl hose for a little more flexiblity, or the ability to see the water in the line.
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Old 01-29-2020, 08:36 PM   #79
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MSGDLD View Post
They may have used the reinforced braided vinyl hose for a little more flexiblity, or the ability to see the water in the line.
My coach has it. A short section on each side of the pump (to isolate vibrations I assume) and from the fill port to the tank because the port is in a slide so flexibility is needed. It's white, not transparent, so it's not for visibility. There's also a section from the toilet down through the floor.
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Old 02-02-2020, 06:49 PM   #80
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MWeiner - The flexible tubing you show in post #30 is to silence the vibration of the water pump. It is sold as a kit by Shur Flo and came with end fittings to attach to the pump. It appears the end fittings have been replaced or a homemade version was used.... The crimp fitting used on your tubing is not correct for soft tubing, it should be a worm type screw clamp. This may be th source of your leak.. The grey plastic fittings at your pump are also not original.
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